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Boat size for Block Island

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I fish the south shore of RI a lot in my 17 foot center console, but never took it to Block Island due to the risks.   I'm starting to look for a bigger boat for various reasons and am thinking of a boat around 21 feet.   I like fishing along the beaches from Pt. Judith to Watch Hill and shallow water, but would like a bigger boat so I can add more people and cover more ground.   While not a primary goal, Block island is a place I would like to take the boat when the weather is good.   Either to fish for stripers or bottom fish, or a day trip with family.   I would think 21 foot CC or DC would be fine, but wanted to get some input.   Thanks.  

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You’re right, but you still have to watch the weather.

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Posted (edited)

I have a 20’ CC I run to Block but you have to be careful I would get trim tabs to make the run  smoother and less bumpy 

I carry extra gas just in case and a jump pack

always enjoy picking out a new boat. Have fun

Edited by Quonnie
Left out a few words

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Used to take my Hydra Sports 2100CC there often weather permitting. Haven't taken my KW 186BR there...yet.

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I'm out there maybe 30 times a season in a deep-vee, 23cc.

That length is probably the norm for most popular length excluding the six pack boats.

Newer boat models are so much beamer and designed much better to take on big water.

As others would say an 18 footer would work too, under the right conditions.

Something that small I'd stay way from the North Rip on certain days.

You spin like a top during rough washing machine water. You need plenty of gunnel and a deep back wash well to be safer.

You see lots of small boats, and inflatables out there, but most all come out of the harbors either tenders of bigger boats or Islanders.

 

I'd be more concerned about fog in a small boat than any other danger.

Everyone has GPS, but without the radar you're sunk. The place is a fog bank most of the time.

Some days it never clears.   

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Length isn't the only thing that matters (queue dick joke here).  I go to and around the island frequently in a 17 foot Quintrex, but it has high sides and a fully enclosed transom.  I'd have no problem taking a typical 18 footer there on "the perfect" day though.

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Years ago, I spent a lot of time fishing the ocean in a 20-foot Sea Ox, and ran significantly farther than the distance between the mainland and Block Island, so a 21-foot center console, provided the hull isn't too flat, would suffice.  But you need to be aware of the weather, and willing to terminate a trip if things start looking worse than expected.

 

As one poster noted above, fog is an issue in those waters, and radar is always a plus.  So are dead reckoning skills, as electronics can go down at very inconvenient times.

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We keep our Hydra Sport Lightning II 212cc in Goat Island Marina in NPT; and if weather permits its a great ride out to the block for a day trip! 

 

**Just have to be mindful of weather as always. 

 

Cheers,

Chris C.

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We take the 17 Mako out of pine Island and run to Block all the time.

Just be careful and pay attention. 

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We were tuna fishing a 21ft Northcoast 30-50 miles offshore last year. If you have the right small boat and the right conditions anything is possible.  

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Have run over in an 18 footer and felt fine. Have been over in a 30 footer and said prayers. Like everyone has said it's all about the conditions.

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After fishing Block Island Sound over the past ten years in an Aquasport 22’ flat back (terrible in these waters) and then a Parker 1801 (best of the Parkers in my opinion), I decided on a Sea Ox 21 modv custom built by Pair Marine (“Pair Customs”). For the reasons noted by others, I opted for Radar and  a radio with its own independent GPS receiver separate from the Garmin GPS. I never go out without paper charts and a compass.  Weirdly enough, you have to actually ask for a compass these days if you want one on a new build.  I feel that this Pair 21, with it’s motor bracket, full transom, trim tabs, dry weight > 3000 lbs, and 80 gallon tank is pretty safe, but I still avoid going offshore unless I have a believable forecast for seas no greater than 2 feet and period no less than 5-7s, mainly because sloppier seas are just not any fun in a modv boat this size.  Pair also makes a deep v 21 and a bigger one too, but the modv is a good compromise for fly fishing around sand bars, reefs, and pond shallows and drifting for fluke in the Sound.  We’ll soon find out how she does among the run and gun wackos during the fall hard tail run.

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Posted (edited)

Helpful small boater tips making the crossing back and forth and boating around the shores.

 

1. Have buddy boat making the crossing each way.

    Helpful if you don't have radar. If that's not possible, keep other boats near by.

2. Ditch bag with waterproof portable VHF radio.

    I also have EPRIP onboard.

3. Cell phone Weather Apt for current radar weather information.

4. GPS has made navigation so important. It's also helpful in other ways.

    It has established a narrow shipping lane where everyone now is condensed and on the same shipping lanes.

    This certain helps when you have motor problems or any other emergency.

5. Keep life jackets handy, easy to get at. Don them in rough water.

6. Ferries and other boats can aid in navigation during dense fog.

7. Don't try to be a hero when conditions are just too rough to return.

    It's a long haul home. Pull into the harbors till passible.

 

Edited by Capt.Castafly

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On 7/12/2022 at 7:42 PM, JfromRI said:

After fishing Block Island Sound over the past ten years in an Aquasport 22’ flat back (terrible in these waters) and then a Parker 1801 (best of the Parkers in my opinion), I decided on a Sea Ox 21 modv custom built by Pair Marine (“Pair Customs”). For the reasons noted by others, I opted for Radar and  a radio with its own independent GPS receiver separate from the Garmin GPS. I never go out without paper charts and a compass.  Weirdly enough, you have to actually ask for a compass these days if you want one on a new build.  I feel that this Pair 21, with it’s motor bracket, full transom, trim tabs, dry weight > 3000 lbs, and 80 gallon tank is pretty safe, but I still avoid going offshore unless I have a believable forecast for seas no greater than 2 feet and period no less than 5-7s, mainly because sloppier seas are just not any fun in a modv boat this size.  Pair also makes a deep v 21 and a bigger one too, but the modv is a good compromise for fly fishing around sand bars, reefs, and pond shallows and drifting for fluke in the Sound.  We’ll soon find out how she does among the run and gun wackos during the fall hard tail run.

Do you launch from Allens Harbor? I've seen a couple of sweet Pairs there.

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