Sandflee

Wood flooring options

Rate this topic

37 posts in this topic

Looking to put down some “wood”flooring in the house upstate maybe a 600sq foot area. Any options other than hardwood or is that the best bet? House will have big fluctuations in temperature when we aren’t up here in winter it can be -5 deg and in summer 85 deg. I know there are pergo, wood tile etc just looking for the best approach. There will be slight heave and settling and it’s on stilts for the past 50 years (crawl space underneath)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Real wood is great, but a production to put down and sand unless you spring for pre-finished. Are you DIY? I've put down a lot of laminate in my rentals. Easy, looks pretty good, and the most recent products are waterproof unlike in the past. Can be less than $2/ft from Costco for 10mm click together planks that come with foam padding already on them. Also relatively easy to repair, just pull the toe moldings and disassemble to the plank that is damaged. Installed properly the floating floor should not have issues with your temp variations, but do too long a run and it might get pulled apart. Usually they say not longer than 25'.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited) · Report post

1 hour ago, gellfex said:

Real wood is great, but a production to put down and sand unless you spring for pre-finished. Are you DIY? I've put down a lot of laminate in my rentals. Easy, looks pretty good, and the most recent products are waterproof unlike in the past. Can be less than $2/ft from Costco for 10mm click together planks that come with foam padding already on them. Also relatively easy to repair, just pull the toe moldings and disassemble to the plank that is damaged. Installed properly the floating floor should not have issues with your temp variations, but do too long a run and it might get pulled apart. Usually they say not longer than 25'.

Thanks 25ft run would likely be about the max and even less if it run the width 

Edited by Sandflee

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited) · Report post

When I had my country house up in New York I installed  1 x 4 yellow pine flooring #1 grade T & G 16’ lengths.  Wall to wall one piece. Then stained it and floor varnish. 
Your  flooring should run perpendicular to the joists.  

Edited by reel em in

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited) · Report post

1 hour ago, reel em in said:

When I had my country house up in New York I installed  1 x 4 yellow pine flooring #1 grade T & G 16’ lengths.  Wall to wall one piece. Then stained it and floor varnish. 
Your  flooring should run perpendicular to the joists.  

Good to know thank you, and now you made me think, back home my bamboo flooring runs parallel to the floor joists 

Edited by Sandflee

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, reel em in said:

When I had my country house up in New York I installed  1 x 4 yellow pine flooring #1 grade T & G 16’ lengths.  Wall to wall one piece. Then stained it and floor varnish. 
Your  flooring should run perpendicular to the joists.  

Pretty soft, no? Kids or dogs would be hard on it. I've had old pine subfloor sanded and finished but that was old growth from 1900 or so. Stuff was denser. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

1 min ago, gellfex said:

Pretty soft, no? Kids or dogs would be hard on it. I've had old pine subfloor sanded and finished but that was old growth from 1900 or so. Stuff was denser. 

Held up well with the kids. dog and company.  I was looking for the length one piece rather than oak strip flooring. Yellow pine is harder than white pine like yellow pine stepping. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited) · Report post

1 hour ago, gellfex said:

Pretty soft, no? Kids or dogs would be hard on it. I've had old pine subfloor sanded and finished but that was old growth from 1900 or so. Stuff was denser. 

Yeah my dogs have grooved the bamboo I wouldn’t use it again 


when you say laminate are you saying true laminate, luxury vinyl or engineered?

 

I just think back to the disasters of Pergo when they got wet 

Edited by Sandflee

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Sandflee said:

Yeah my dogs have grooved the bamboo I wouldn’t use it again 


when you say laminate are you saying true laminate, luxury vinyl or engineered?

 

I just think back to the disasters of Pergo when they got wet 

The strand bamboo tends to be much harder than most woods, so if the dogs grooved it, you'll need to choose the flooring pretty carefully.  My brother-in-law and sister loved the look of cherry and didn't think about their dogs.  Great looking for maybe a year.  My labs have been tough on my oak floor, less so on the Brazilian cherry in our family room. They are both a bear to trim their nails, wish it was different.

 

Back to your original question, if you aren't going to have stable climate control, I'd think hard before installing traditional hardwoods.  Possibly engineered hardwood, but not traditional tongue and groove.   We've got luxury vinyl in our basement and I am a huge fan.  It can certainly be done DIY.  With any of the floating floor options, spend the extra on better underlayment.  It helps minimize the hollow sound. A lot of the better flooring now comes with thicker underlayment attached which makes the install easier. Some of the inexpensive laminates are better than others.  I put a cheap one down for my son a couple of years ago and the joints were a real PITA. Looks good and has help up very well, but a royal pain to install

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, rathrbefishn said:

The strand bamboo tends to be much harder than most woods, so if the dogs grooved it, you'll need to choose the flooring pretty carefully.  My brother-in-law and sister loved the look of cherry and didn't think about their dogs.  Great looking for maybe a year.  My labs have been tough on my oak floor, less so on the Brazilian cherry in our family room. They are both a bear to trim their nails, wish it was different.

 

Back to your original question, if you aren't going to have stable climate control, I'd think hard before installing traditional hardwoods.  Possibly engineered hardwood, but not traditional tongue and groove.   We've got luxury vinyl in our basement and I am a huge fan.  It can certainly be done DIY.  With any of the floating floor options, spend the extra on better underlayment.  It helps minimize the hollow sound. A lot of the better flooring now comes with thicker underlayment attached which makes the install easier. Some of the inexpensive laminates are better than others.  I put a cheap one down for my son a couple of years ago and the joints were a real PITA. Looks good and has help up very well, but a royal pain to install

Yep my sister said she went with Luxury Vinyl and loves it 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 mins ago, Sandflee said:

Yep my sister said she went with Luxury Vinyl and loves it 

 

I am just starting the shopping/research and this is shaping up to be the no brainer way to go.  In store some of the products look great.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 mins ago, 55555s said:

 

I am just starting the shopping/research and this is shaping up to be the no brainer way to go.  In store some of the products look great.  

Yep, just need to plan out how/what i'm doing around the wood stove, its on a raised hearth now so likely just go around it 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Sandflee said:

Yep my sister said she went with Luxury Vinyl and loves it 

That's what I went with. Not a fan so far. 

 

Pros: easy install, tough surface, looks pretty good and it's waterproof. 

 

Cons: it's very flexible, the loss per box is insane (chipped corners etc). 

 

I laid this over old glue down tiles. I began laying without an underlayment but changed my mind when I saw how it contours to the most minor of imperfections. The underlayment helped but didn't get rid of the issue. 

 

The cost of this stuff isn't cheap compared to other choices but because it goes down so easy, it makes it very worth it. I did it as a temporary "soft remodel" in my kitchen. I plan to completely gut and remove load bearing walls in 5 years. I am a perfectionist and the flexing really bothers me. 

 

Here's where I went wrong though... I chose the thinnest option. The reason was, I wanted the slightest transition from the hardwood in the living and dining rooms. It didn't work out anyway because I gave up on trying to get the old flooring up, which was chipping up in 1" pieces. 

 

My recommendation would be to get the thickest option. Account for damage loss out of the box. Order at least 5 extra boxes. Home Depot told me that they would have taken back any individual damaged piece and given me credit. Knowing this stuff now, I think I'd have a much more favorable opinion of the stuff. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
23 hours ago, gellfex said:

Real wood is great, but a production to put down and sand unless you spring for pre-finished. Are you DIY? I've put down a lot of laminate in my rentals. Easy, looks pretty good, and the most recent products are waterproof unlike in the past. Can be less than $2/ft from Costco for 10mm click together planks that come with foam padding already on them. Also relatively easy to repair, just pull the toe moldings and disassemble to the plank that is damaged. Installed properly the floating floor should not have issues with your temp variations, but do too long a run and it might get pulled apart. Usually they say not longer than 25'.

A material selection that will be used for many years. I know real woods that are constantly wet. I've heard of such choices in furniture. Is there any material you recommend?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
46 mins ago, Scallywag said:

My recommendation would be to get the thickest option. Account for damage loss out of the box. Order at least 5 extra boxes.

100%. That's why I like the newest Costco Mohawk thats 10mm. Used to be 8mm. Usual click vinyl is 5mm. I found the vinyl harder to install than laminate, harder to get it to click together, especially when you're doing edges or undercuts. But I used it in kitchens and a common hallway/stairs since thicker would have been hard to do on the treads with aluminum nosing. Again, the newest board laminates are advertised as 'waterproof'. I also always keep at least an extra box stashed away for repairs, it's unlikely the same product will be available in the future.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to register here in order to participate.

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.