Striper46

Cracking Epoxy

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Hi, I’ve had a couple cracks in my epoxy around the belly weights. Looks like they are sinking too. I try to mush the water-weld in as much as possible and sand them flush. You couldnt even see the weights when the plug was finished. what am I doing wrong? Tia!

 

 

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before:

 

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Edited by Striper46

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Wht type of epoxy are you using,

Possible  shrinking of your belly putty.

 Possible swelling of wood from water

 

Correcting problem

Use ayc

Epixy seal wood. Or boiled linseed oil

Swap out to epoxy putty for belly hole.

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4 hours ago, bassmaster said:

Wht type of epoxy are you using,

Possible  shrinking of your belly putty.

 Possible swelling of wood from water

 

Correcting problem

Use ayc

Epixy seal wood. Or boiled linseed oil

Swap out to epoxy putty for belly hole.

I think it’s probably swelling of the wood cause I’ve epoxy a bunch of plugs and haven’t had that problem. Plugs I didn’t build.

 

I am using minwax Lacquer sanding sealer and I’m thinking it’s to thick to penetrate. 
 

I use Pine, what would be the difference between pine n ayc far as epoxy is concerned?

 

I already us a epoxy putty.

 

tia!

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3 mins ago, bassmaster said:

Pine?  Do you meen boiled,  it would stop the wood from swelling

What epoxy you using

I use pine board to build the plugs. Envirotex. Thx

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As  someone who restores wooden boats for a living, may I make a few observations?  One, it is very difficult to stop wood from shrinking and swelling, even epoxy sealing over the entire surface does not prevent this.  AYC is much less subject to movement than regular pine.  Look for coatings with a measure of flexibility when cured.  Look into G-Flex Epoxy made by West System.  You can take a cured plug of this epoxy out of the bottom of a cup and bend it back and forth, it's also designed to work with hard to glue woods like white oak and teak, and can be used on damp woods.  Everything is a balance when working with wood in water.

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8 hours ago, Oakman said:

As  someone who restores wooden boats for a living, may I make a few observations?  One, it is very difficult to stop wood from shrinking and swelling, even epoxy sealing over the entire surface does not prevent this.  AYC is much less subject to movement than regular pine.  Look for coatings with a measure of flexibility when cured.  Look into G-Flex Epoxy made by West System.  You can take a cured plug of this epoxy out of the bottom of a cup and bend it back and forth, it's also designed to work with hard to glue woods like white oak and teak, and can be used on damp woods.  Everything is a balance when working with wood in water.

Some good info here thank you!

 

how Durable is G-Flex? My concern would be hook rash with something that’s flexible and I guess softer? 

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Envirotex is supposed to be a somewhat flexible epoxy isn't it?

 

Is the surface of the epoxy becoming more depressed over these weight holes?

 

Sweet looking glider! 

 

 

 

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48 mins ago, TopStriperAngler said:

Envirotex is supposed to be a somewhat flexible epoxy isn't it?

 

Is the surface of the epoxy becoming more depressed over these weight holes?

 

Sweet looking glider! 

 

 

 

Not sure if it’s flexible?

 

slightly sunken yes. 

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From my very limited experience- I have ran into this problem when I used anything other than straight up epoxy to fill the lead holes. Yes, sanding it flush takes a little more time but using a rasp makes it quick. I just use clear 5min epoxy I think it’s jb weld from homechepot 

I have tried other options like wood filler and other things but they all end up shrinking. I think a lot of guys on here use some kind of epoxy wood filler which may work as well

i also learned that it’s gotta cure the whole way too which could be a couple days even though it’s 5min epoxy. 
I also melted and poured my lead in the hole so there is no void volume in there 

Once again… I’m a rookie but these are the rookie mistakes I made and learned from… 

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Also, I have used G-flex - it’s nice stuff. I used it for some quick surfboard ding repair, it was the 5 or 15min epoxy. This was like 10 yrs and I kinda remember it not being clear but not sure. It’s durable and I don’t remember it feeling soft but it wasn’t hard and brittle. Etex feels a little similar with flexibility but it as much as gflex

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5 hours ago, Striper46 said:

Some good info here thank you!

 

how Durable is G-Flex? My concern would be hook rash with something that’s flexible and I guess softer? 

You should check out the specs on the West System website, it's pretty solid stuff even though flexible. The paint you put over it will take hook rash faster than the epoxy.  You can also mix their additives into it to give it different properties, read about them on the web.  One final observation, most epoxies give off what is called amine blush as they cure.  It's a waxy substance that forms on the surface of the epoxy as it cures.  As you might expect coatings will not stick to this wax so you must wash it off before coating over epoxies.  Beware the products that claim to have no blush.

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2 hours ago, Oakman said:

 One final observation, most epoxies give off what is called amine blush as they cure.  It's a waxy substance that forms on the surface of the epoxy as it cures.  As you might expect coatings will not stick to this wax so you must wash it off before coating over epoxies.  Beware the products that claim to have no blush.

Very interesting. I have had this happen with D2T cool to learn the name for the phenomenon. 

 

@OakmanI am making some gliders out of a board of white oak. I don't know what species just that it's definitely white oak--bought from hardwood lumber place. So far I sealed 'em with epoxy, rusto-painted, and topcoated with Bob Smith 30 min. Curious what I can expect from this wood as it starts to absorb moisture. Will it swell much?

 

 

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18 hours ago, Striper46 said:

I am using minwax Lacquer sanding sealer…

Sounds like this is the issue, it is allowing too much water into the wood through the belly hole/through hole area

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Posted (edited) · Report post

I have used just sanding sealer in the past to coat wood for testing and have had issues with water intrusion

Epoxy sealing works great but is a PIA. You shouldn’t have problems with pine if it’s well sealed.

Edited by rollincoal

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