FishingMid23

Long Distance Trailering Tips

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Hey all, 

 

I'm heading down to FL from NJ in mid July for about a month, and planning on bringing the boat. I am wondering if:

 

a) this is a dumb idea and I shouldn't bother trailering it that far

 

and

 

b) if it isn't a dumb idea, does anyone have any tips/tricks on what I should do prior to leaving and what I should have with me in case something goes wrong? Planning on bringing grease gun and new bearings and I have a spare tire mounted on the trailer. 

 

Any and all advice is greatly appreciated!

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inspect the berings.

even new berings will freeze up when the knut is to tight or to loose.

when you run the motor in salt rinse with fresh water after every use.

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After trailering for quite a few years, I would just recommend that you look at your trailer and imagine all that could go wrong and prepare for that. Some electrical parts, maybe a taillight, etc. I have found it is way better to have it and not need it, than be stuck on the side of the road wishing you did. 

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Trailered for years.  Dragged my Outrage from Key West to Cape Cod.  Never had a problem.  

 

Prior to leaving, replace bearings and seals. Get new tire with attached hub to where you can literally swap the whole unit if in dire straits.  I did a tire swap during rush hour on the Jersey Turnpike in about five minutes once (no joke) on our Airstream as I had planned for the tire to go flat, had jack propositioned, and all tools readily handy.  The kids were babies and never woke up from their nap.  Even got the tire ramp where you either drive your front tires up or back up over it to elevate the flat tire (this is of course for a dually). 

 

Replace the winch strap. tie downs, etc.  Secure the lower unit somehow.  Plan on some idiot about running you off the road during your trip and prep accordingly.  Even go so far as doing rehearsals for when **** goes wrong.  

 

  You don't want some drunk driver or some teen-queen looking at her phone to drive into you when you are changing tires.  Plan on limiting your exposure on the side of the road.  Flares, triangles, etc. for night-time emergencies.  

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when you drive,every stop grab your wheel hub ,the temperature tell you if it operate properly.

get boat USA insurance,if you brake down they tow for free to fix.

it is big money to tow off road.

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4 mins ago, snag777 said:

when you drive,every stop grab your wheel hub ,the temperature tell you if it operate properly.

get boat USA insurance,if you brake down they tow for free to fix.

it is big money to tow off road.

Yup.  20 bucks gets you one of those infra-red temperature guns.  Every stop I'd walk around the rig and shoot the tires, the hubs, etc.   This is your life (and others) we're talking about.  Can't be too diligent.  

 

Also - 20 minutes into the trip, pull over and re-check everything; do the temperature check.  Like when we'd go out on patrol at night - ten minutes outside the wire, settle in a defensible position for a few minutes to get the atmospherics, sounds, smells, etc. into you. Check equipment for quietness, etc.  Brief security halt.  

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What the other guys said.  Plus I bring a full sized floor jack and 2 jack stands.  And an 18V 1/2" impact with all the sockets.  And enough wiring and tools to replace a tail light on side of road.

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What I also did was go to Home Depot and get a large toolbox and put everything I could need inside. As soon as I hitch up the boat the toolbox goes in back of the truck. This way if I need something it is in there.

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Posted (edited) · Report post

I don’t think anyone mentioned it……but bring a grease gun and a few tubes of grease………

Edited by aae0130

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it is hard to work on lights.

i would pick set off lights from Harbor Freit for trailer,they are cheep.when you go home hook them up test them if they work and pack them up.

now if you have truble with lights just hook them up and tie with zip tie and you redy to go.

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Posted (edited) · Report post

If your tires are getting old for trailer tires (like older than 6 years) think about getting new before leaving. Test brakes make sure they work & don’t hang up & overheat. Spin tires listen for rumbling from bearings & excessive play. Carry spare tire, jack, impact gun, spare lug nuts, set of bearings & seals etc. Also one of those Hopkins quick fix wiring connectors for the trailer light in case one of the pins on those connectors bends or breaks. I have a spare connector harness that I made up that I can just plug into the trailer main harness…these are clamp on terminals but I solder them carefully with a small 40 watt soldering iron. 

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Edited by LouC

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On 6/26/2022 at 2:57 PM, snag777 said:

it is hard to work on lights.

i would pick set off lights from Harbor Freit for trailer,they are cheep.when you go home hook them up test them if they work and pack them up.

now if you have truble with lights just hook them up and tie with zip tie and you redy to go.

Definitely get these.  I also use them on short tow when light not working and I’m lazy.  Or pressed for time.  

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Hey everyone, in case you wanted an update:

 

I was planning on going from NJ to FL in 10 hours yesterday and 10 today, but woke up yesterday morning to a dead battery in the truck so I had to do 4 hours yesterday and 15ish today.

 

Trailer held up perfectly. Before leaving, I inspected all bearings and they looked fine so I cleaned and repacked them and put them back on the trailer. I bought two new sets of bearings and a complete, pre-packed hub set in case something went wrong. I also replaced the old incandescent brake lights with LEDs from West Marine which I think make a big difference. At each gas stop I felt the hubs and torqued down each lug nut -  they were pretty loose after the first 2-3 hours so I was happy I did. 

 

Thanks for the great advice. I hope this thread helps other newbies later on. 

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