Turkeybacn

Be careful out there.

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I'm not sure how much I trust these videos, I've seen several videos that demonstrated the ability to avoid sinking while wearing waders, even with the waders flooded with water

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There definitely was some hefty groundswell around last night at the top of the tide. Sets rolled onshore with short periods, too.

 

Didn't ease off until hours later and the tide was mostly down. But you'd still get a cracker of a set every couple minutes.

 

Surf and swell forecast before heading out – every time. I'm guilty of skipping that part too..when the wind is low, then I get out there and hear the rumbling and booming breaks and it's oh crap. Groundswell will **ck your chit up good if not respected. It's what sweeps most guys off the rocks to instant  trouble or doom. not wind-waves..imo

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Tidesforfishing.com.  Has pretty good wave forecasts.  Plus weather, tides, moon phases etc.  for about any location

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I was 31 years old and I had been fishing Chatham there was a series of bars, I would wade the the 3rd bar and once the water almost got to my waist you leave. 

 Well one night the fog rolled in and I was into fish real good, then the fog covered the light and i could not see.

 I was waiding back and water was coming over my waiders.

By some luck i caught a glimpse of the light. I was headed hard left so was going wrong way a little,

 The light got stronger and i made it to shore

 And let me tell you I was scared and from that day on there was no waiding chances for me ever...

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Glad it worked out for you. 
 

Buying a wetsuit years ago was a game changer. Floating in that is much better than any other option. 

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Glad it worked out for you. 
 

Buying a wetsuit years ago was a game changer. Floating in that is much better than any other option. 

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Glad it worked out for you. 
 

Buying a wetsuit years ago was a game changer. Floating in that is much better than any other option. 

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If you are wading, I HIGHLY recommend a dive compass.  Take a reverse azimuth (either point to sea and add/subtract 180); or turn around and face the shore perpendicular to your body and dial that in on your compass and leave it alone.   Go about your business and if the fog rolls in, or you get disoriented, etc. simply line the compass up and move out.  Saved my ass a BUNCH of times.   A MUST-have for shore-diving up there.  

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1 hour ago, Turkeybacn said:

Congratulations!

 

You're right though a wetsuit is an incredible tool for surfcasting. 

When your in your 20's and 30's , strong as a bull and have stamina , but even then bad stuff can happen quick. 

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6 hours ago, JimP said:

As a Combat Diver, you won't get me out on the water at night without an inflatable swim vest of some sort; a flare (taped to your dive knife); a strobe light, and a diver's compass.  The water is a HUGELY unforgiving environment.  You won't last long if not prepared.  Be careful!!!!

How do you secure your dive knife? To a belt, I assume. Lash clips?

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I will have to pick up a compass and some flares, and start actually wearing my PFD. I hooked a 44’ fish while wetsuiting standing on the edge of a drop off 2 weeks ago. It pulled me into the water and the swells started inching me out. Not cool. I loosened the drag and swam back to the bar, and somehow still landed the fish. Wild and scary. 
 

 

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Mother nature is a bitch.  One minute she can be sweet, calm, and a pleasure to be around.   In rhe blink of an eye, she can turn into a raging psychopath, trying her best to kill you.

 

I worked for close to a year longlining for swordfish back in the late 70's.  I had more than a few times that I was scared half to death.  The only saving grace is that you have too much to think about during those times to ponder your fate.  Head on a swivel the entire time, and never trust the weather buoys!

 

And anyone who has spent anytime on the water who says they weren't scared at times, is either a fool or a liar.

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