z-man

Commercial Bass Season

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165 posts in this topic

3 hours ago, bob_G said:

Thank you CWitek.

 

Its a pleasure to have someone from my generation, who fished during this time weigh in.

 

I never believed it was commercial fishing that brought down the fishery in the 70s and 80s.   While it certainly didn't help, everyone overlooked the fact that we had multiple poor YOY classes. The bass had several poor spawns in succession. Much of it was due to poor water levels. Pollution.

 

In spite of the fact the minimum size was 16" to the fork of the tail, and the bulk of the comm fishery was made up of small fish,  imo that wasn't the main problem.  The primary problem was, the bass were producing almost no YOY. The small fish went away because there were none in the pipeline.  

Guys today refuse to accept the fact that fishing pressure wasn't a fraction of what it is today.  I recall fishing the Elizabeths in the early 70s from Woods Hole to Nashawena, day after day, and not seeing another boat fishing bass!

 

Yes, Bob Pond seemed to be dialed into the striper situation to some degree. But he was alone. Striper producing states certainly weren't.  I'm not even certain there was a Ma DMF back then? 

Commercial fishjing played a role, but so did years of poor recruitment.  Fish populations are just like bank accounts; you can't take out more than you put in, and expect to have them last.

 

The mid-'70s saw some of the highest levels of commercial harvest ever recorded, just as spawning success began to tank.  It wasn't just pinhookers, althiough that's how a lot of the commercial fishermen caught their bass.  Here on Long Island, the '70s were the final hurrah of the haul seiners, who whould take bass of all sizes, and often in very high numbers.  Peter Matthiessen's book, Men's Lives, describes a time when Long Island baymen went down to North Carolina and haul seined so many bass that their net began to tear, and they had to reinforce it with a second net run around the first.  They caught so many bass that they glutted the markets from Hatteras to Manhattan, and ended up burying something like 50,000 pounds of unwanted fish in the sand.  And some of those fish were the largest females--50, 60, even 70 pounds,

 

If you count the anglers who sold their catch, commercial fishing comprised a very big part of the landings back then.  Today, things have turned around, with anglers responsible for the lion's share of the kill.

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7 hours ago, CWitek said:

No, theyt're not.

 

That possibility was raised in the Draft Amendment 7 to the management plan, but the ASMFC's striped bass management board rejected it last month.  It is no longer on the table.

Striped Bass Mismanagement Board. Bought and paid for.

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1 hour ago, Chris76 said:

Definitely not. Blood line not even removed Disgusting!  No thanks

Some fish dealers ask you not to bleed the fish. I think the fish often get big clots that can break when totes of bass get moved around. Now you may have half a dozen big stripers covered in blood. Not exactly what buyers are looking for .

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3 hours ago, TBYRD said:

Big Y in Central MA joined in on the hype :banghd:

B682C131-C5E5-4A36-A2B6-83A72DB7A1B6.jpeg

That looks pretty nasty with that big blood line. It’s also a huge fillet. That must have been a big bass. 

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Guessing some of the hotter days with little to no ice might affect the mush factor with some of these fish before they are sold to a dealer… Unless you are setup to care, some of the weekend warrior permit holders that run into a lucky street may not have the means or motivation to keep the meat cool.

 

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Many traditional striper clubs shut down in the late 1800’s due to low numbers and poor catches, it’s theorized that the dams constructed on on northeast rivers because of the industrial revolution decimated the local bass populations, it most certainly wasn’t fishing pressure 

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14 hours ago, Drew C. said:

Coconut cod seems to be a big seller! 

 

32 mins ago, foxfai said:

LOL, people went for the coconut cod


…..and noted in fine print as Previously Frozen.   :upck:

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1 hour ago, Joe G said:

 


…..and noted in fine print as Previously Frozen.   :upck:

 

17 mins ago, FizzyFish said:

good eye Joe

 

SeaPack markets a crispy coconut cod breaded product.  SeaPack also markets a Budweiser beer battered cod as well.  Both are sold frozen in a stylish 8-14 oz box.  

 

I wager that coconut cod is just a SeaPack frozen seafood product that the Big Y simply took out of its box and placed in the fish case.  

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