JTR

Chickens

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4 hours ago, bob_G said:

Why the garlic and vinegar?  Mediterranean chickens?

Doctor Goat says it's good fer there system so I've been told.

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We have slant roof(that opens)outside the pen chicken house with egg picking and feeding in it. saves walking in the shity pen.

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4 hours ago, oldgoat said:

We have slant roof(that opens)outside the pen chicken house with egg picking and feeding in it. saves walking in the shity pen.

Can you post a picture? I’ve been thinking about getting chickens and looking for coop ideas. 

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B oth of my kids raised chickens and peddled the eggs in the neighborhood many years ago.  They also raised rabbits and a pair of cranky geese.  At the time we were logging of a lot we had bought along side the railroad, quite a few mature poplar trees that we milled into 2x4s and 2x6s for the framing of the coop and had enough 1"boards for the floor and roof.  We also harvested enough cherry to pay most of the cost of the land................... 

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On 5/28/2022 at 4:10 AM, VitaminDee said:

Make sure you have some type of netting above or a cover. My moms chicken was taken out by a hawk, tried to come back for the others too.

My girlfriend's co-worker has about a dozen chickens. He has to keep his coup safe from predators 'cuz he's lost a chicken or 2 to birds of prey.

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You need 3 chickens minimum. Something about their "safety in numbers and roosting mentality.

You only need a rooster if you plan on hatching eggs. Many communities are zoned for chickens but NOT roosters due to the noise factor.

My sister started out with 6 hens, then added 6 more, and when a few died (natural chicken illnesses) she got 12 more poults (pre-egg layer age hens) so that they would have an ample supply of eggs.

 

When you get chickens, you need to understand that if you are expecting to get a nice plump hen to fry up after her egg laying days are done, you will be disappointed. Egg layers don't make the best eaters. You can eat them, but they will be lean, like a wild turkey compared to a farm raised one.

Also, there will be periods each spring where they will not lay any eggs at all. This is during their molting period.

 

One of the added benefits, besides the insect eradication, is that you can feed them some of your veggie kitchen scraps and crushed dried egg shells. Remember, they need calcium for egg production.

 

We call my sister "the crazy chicken lady"

She could roll off the names of numerous breeds like we could list all the lures we used during the season.

 

But above all else, nothing beats fresh eggs.

 

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Posted (edited)

On 6/1/2022 at 10:08 AM, z-man said:

Can you post a picture? I’ve been thinking about getting chickens and looking for coop ideas. 

Get something u can move around.   

20years in one spot. My coop & pen  encroached down to the septic system

Edited by PSegnatelli

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My family has been raising/keeping chickens for 6 years. We currently have 10 hens. My wife does most of the day to day work (feeding, cleaning the coop, etc), my kids collect and clean the eggs, and I do whatever manual labor is required...coop and run maintenance, repairs, humping bags of feed, etc...

 

It's fun and rewarding.

 

Our town doesn't allow roosters, so they're more exposed to predator danger. We've lost a few to hawks and foxes over the years, but generally keep them as safe as possible, and only allow them to free-range in the yard in the evening when we're around to keep an eye on them.

 

Both of our coops came from https://roostandroot.com - The prices are pretty eye watering, but the quality is exceptional, the designs are tried and true, and they're super functional. We had the Round-Top Backyard Coop for a few years, but it was extremely hard to clean/maintain in the winter, so we upgraded to the Chicken Loft, which has been absolutely fantastic. Walk-in makes cleaning super easy, year-round, it's spacious, yet relatively compact, the chickens love it, and it's well ventilated in the summer and pretty weather proof in the winter (we bought panels that cover the screen).

 

The feeders and waterers only need to be refreshed about once a week. We feed them organic pellets and scratch that come from a local livestock co-op, and we buy dried meal worms online, that they LOVE. They also eat almost all fruit scraps, and a lot of veggie scraps.

 

We run an extension cord out to the coop in the winter to keep the water from freezing.

 

Their eggs are incredible, and I can't even imagine buying store-bought eggs anymore. We give away lots of eggs in the summer.

 

Overall, well worth the effort and investment, and fun to have around. 

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9 mins ago, Mojua said:

My family has been raising/keeping chickens for 6 years. We currently have 10 hens. My wife does most of the day to day work (feeding, cleaning the coop, etc), my kids collect and clean the eggs, and I do whatever manual labor is required...coop and run maintenance, repairs, humping bags of feed, etc...

 

It's fun and rewarding.

 

Our town doesn't allow roosters, so they're more exposed to predator danger. We've lost a few to hawks and foxes over the years, but generally keep them as safe as possible, and only allow them to free-range in the yard in the evening when we're around to keep an eye on them.

 

Both of our coops came from https://roostandroot.com - The prices are pretty eye watering, but the quality is exceptional, the designs are tried and true, and they're super functional. We had the Round-Top Backyard Coop for a few years, but it was extremely hard to clean/maintain in the winter, so we upgraded to the Chicken Loft, which has been absolutely fantastic. Walk-in makes cleaning super easy, year-round, it's spacious, yet relatively compact, the chickens love it, and it's well ventilated in the summer and pretty weather proof in the winter (we bought panels that cover the screen).

 

The feeders and waterers only need to be refreshed about once a week. We feed them organic pellets and scratch that come from a local livestock co-op, and we buy dried meal worms online, that they LOVE. They also eat almost all fruit scraps, and a lot of veggie scraps.

 

We run an extension cord out to the coop in the winter to keep the water from freezing.

 

Their eggs are incredible, and I can't even imagine buying store-bought eggs anymore. We give away lots of eggs in the summer.

 

Overall, well worth the effort and investment, and fun to have around. 

$6,000 for a chicken coop? You can buy eggs for 5 lifetimes for that. If I build one it’s going to be pretty much free salvaged materials except for the chicken wire. 

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1 hour ago, z-man said:

$6,000 for a chicken coop? You can buy eggs for 5 lifetimes for that. If I build one it’s going to be pretty much free salvaged materials except for the chicken wire. 

Think we paid $3500 a few years ago, but regardless, I agree that it was expensive. Thing about building one yourself from salvaged lumber is that it really is important for it to be appropriately ventilated, but also secure, accessible, and comfortable for the birds. Ultimately wasn’t worth my time to design, source, and build something when I could buy something superior. Also, important detail; my wife wanted it, she never asks for anything OR bitches about all the stuff I spend money on, and happy wife = happy life. Finally, it’s a fantastic product that we’re super happy with, and we could afford it, so I’m not too worried about the $50/dozen eggs…

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They have arrived. Day 1 was a success. McMurray threw in a couple extras, so we have 11 for now. I’m really surprised that they’re tough enough to survive 40+ hours in a little box going through the USPS system, but they all seem very healthy. Once they got some food and water in them, their energy levels really skyrocketed. The dog doesn’t seem to think they’re toys yet either, so that’s good, and they didn’t seem bothered by the dog either - the goal is to keep them well acquainted, so they are all cool with each other.

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17 mins ago, JTR said:

They have arrived. Day 1 was a success. McMurray threw in a couple extras, so we have 11 for now. I’m really surprised that they’re tough enough to survive 40+ hours in a little box going through the USPS system, but they all seem very healthy. Once they got some food and water in them, their energy levels really skyrocketed. The dog doesn’t seem to think they’re toys yet either, so that’s good, and they didn’t seem bothered by the dog either - the goal is to keep them well acquainted, so they are all cool with each other.

ABCD26E2-29E8-4E81-BEC3-90F22B9C8C86.jpeg

06A986F4-4A9F-4006-86F8-5566FECE4672.jpeg

584B3EC0-9A38-4AD4-93E7-E4858A1FF4CD.png

Plympton's population goes up 11.:witty:

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45 mins ago, K Foley said:

Plympton's population goes up 11.:witty:

My guys would try to use them for retrieving practice.

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1 hour ago, Jeff270 said:

My guys would try to use them for retrieving practice.

I thought mine would too. 

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