DLHO

New to the forum and seeing shoals advice

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Hello.  I am new to the forum and thanks for the ad, I have a 26 foot McKenzie cuttyhunk bass boat, not new to running a vessel or dragging bait.  But my boat is on the hook in the Piscataquis river and I am wanting to learn about the shoals and the places to avoid more then anything else.   Not looking for your sweet spots and not going to tail anymore and crowd them out.   I hope to be able to add to this forum and not just take, I have been a saltwater fly fisherman for almost 4 decades and feel free to ask me about that. But this cuttyhunk has been a long time coming and a labor of love for my son and I.  So any thoughts and information is appreciated and will do same in return.  Thank. DLHO 

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6 hours ago, DLHO said:

Hello.  I am new to the forum and thanks for the ad, I have a 26 foot McKenzie cuttyhunk bass boat, not new to running a vessel or dragging bait.  But my boat is on the hook in the Piscataquis river and I am wanting to learn about the shoals and the places to avoid more then anything else.   Not looking for your sweet spots and not going to tail anymore and crowd them out.   I hope to be able to add to this forum and not just take, I have been a saltwater fly fisherman for almost 4 decades and feel free to ask me about that. But this cuttyhunk has been a long time coming and a labor of love for my son and I.  So any thoughts and information is appreciated and will do same in return.  Thank. DLHO 

Start with a chart.  At home, at your leisure, when you can take the time to figure out where the water is and where it isn't.  Then go out and take a look around to see how the charts translate to reality.  Start out in the marked channel and look for breaking shoals at low tide.  Poke around at higher tides, to figure out where things might be safe and where they aren't.  Try to look at places on calmer days with the sun behind you, where it's easier to see color changes that indicate subsurface struvture.  When the current runs, look for boils on the surface, boulders and shoals uptide.

 

There are no truly safe shortcuts.  I've been running boats since I was in grade school, and that was over 50 years ago.  To learn an area takes a little time and effort, but if you're planning to leave the marked channel, particularly on a rocky coast, you have to pay the price.  The nice thing is that once you learn where they are the rocks don't move--unlike the sandbars here on Long Island, that need relearning each season.

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I have the chart and thank you.  all solid salty advice.   And yes, thank god rocks do not move.  Tight lines.  DLHO 

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Good advise on studying the charts,next get yourself a good chartplotter/with depth sounder ,they're not that expensive.  It will allow you to know exactly where you are and how much water there is in your area. They give you and accurate real time picture of where you are . Another great feature is you will have a track of where you have been and you can use it to backtrack in foggy or low visibility.conditions . It has saved my bacon many times.

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Welcome to the forum.I got a new boat last year and fished a ton.When running the coast I generally just stay about 1 mile I\offshore.I also keep an eye on my Garmin as I am running.Say hello when you see a dark greykey west 239 with a couple of guys with smiles and a bunch of fishing rods!

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I will absolutely!  My Mackenzie is yellow and I will be the one poking in and out of the rips.  But swing by for a beer and a laugh.   Thanks. 

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Everyone remember wear your PDF and kill switch, especially if you are out by yourself.  I have to  keep telling myself this because it's a pain to do . I'm almost always a solo fishermen.

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On 5/19/2022 at 10:30 AM, Joe said:

A clammer friend advised dragging a long piece of ski rope when drift fishing alone.

That’ll wind up in your prop the first time you forget about it.

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ski rope floats & it might save your life. Like anything else if it's part of your routine... I was looking for it once when I thought I was going over the side. Though the drift was so fast it probably wouldn't have helped.

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My grandfather was a Gloucester schooner Capt and a member of the master mariners association and he said when they were in a thick of fog, they would drag a line off the stern to get a bearing and to make sure they were no Veering off course. I have never heard of dragging a line while clamming.  I use to clam on the north shore as did my cousin and his son still does. I can ask him if this is something new.  Thanks for your help 

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21 hours ago, MakoMike said:

That’ll wind up in your prop the first time you forget about it.

Yeah, I worry about that too.  I leave a rope just hanging over the edge, but out of the water.   Thought is I could swim back to boat and grab the rope.  But if strong current and in a PDF not happening.   But better than nothing.  

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