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May 2022 Fishing Reports

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12 hours ago, suntzu said:

Two boats, going opposite directions, trolling wire & umbrella rigs IN Manasquan Inlet in the fog snag each other, and I had the joy of watching one of the funniest things ever - fishing is bad but there are still entertaining reasons to be out there …. At a safe distance:)

 It was maybe 1967 and dad brought us kids to the inlet pretty often. There was a real loud mouth close by , every other word out of his mouth was a curse, who heaved a cast at a smaller boat who was going pretty fast IIRC and got hooked on it. He was cursing up a storm and everyone was laughing as he sliced the crap out of his hands trying to stop the spool. It was in my ''What I did for summer vacation'' school report...Dopes can also be very funny:laugh::laugh:

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9 hours ago, Wampire said:

Got a question for you. I’m not new to surf fishing but I live 2.5-3 hours from the salt and I only get about 3-4 day trips in for blues and stripes a year. I’ve seen lots of posts if yours commenting on rolling white water in the context that it’s good. Everything I presumed meant that rolling white water reads as shallow and that the deeper pockets, edges of sandbars, cuts, etc fish better. Can you provide some education to me on how to differentiate what good rolling white water looks like and what bad would look like? Just curious as I typically avoid most shallow flat stretches which to me looks like rolling white water. 

So here's my take.  First, bass are strong swimmers and have no problem navigating rough water.  More opportunities to find food.  Second, a rolling surf is a map to reading the water.  How the waves break, where the washouts and rips set up gives you a real understanding of the structure to fish below the water.  Learn to read the water and you will be much more successful in finding more fish.

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15 hours ago, suntzu said:

Two boats, going opposite directions, trolling wire & umbrella rigs IN Manasquan Inlet in the fog snag each other, and I had the joy of watching one of the funniest things ever - fishing is bad but there are still entertaining reasons to be out there …. At a safe distance:)

Surprised this doesnt happen more often, especially in fog.

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Fished most of the outgoing and the start of the incoming, MOCO out front yesterday.  Very foggy, south wind picked up in the afternoon.  Lots of debris in the water.  Saw dolphins, and some birds picking small bait (and saw a few peanuts washed up).  Avoided the skunk with an acrobatic hickory, a guy near me caught a keeper fluke, and those were the only fish I saw caught.  Did a lot of walking around low and was surprised at how much the soft structure changed from last fall (hadn't been to this beach since October).  

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1 hour ago, MC55 said:

So here's my take.  First, bass are strong swimmers and have no problem navigating rough water.  More opportunities to find food.  Second, a rolling surf is a map to reading the water.  How the waves break, where the washouts and rips set up gives you a real understanding of the structure to fish below the water.  Learn to read the water and you will be much more successful in finding more fish.

@wampire

 

 

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On 5/14/2022 at 0:32 PM, MC55 said:

So finally found a few that could put a bend in the rod.  Fished out front with very nice conditions, a rolling surf, clean water and overcast foggy sky.  Upcoming full moon is pushing the water up the beach so keep an eye out for that.  Have to confess that I was tossing all of the plastics and plugs but couldn't get a touch so went to the bugs and got results. First keeper size of the season at 31 inches and a second at 27.  May is the new June, right?

 

 

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Mike, congrats on the out of season, don't count, bug fish. Appears you've gone over to the @DeeMonee dark side! Now that my daughter is finally married off, as of yesterday, I can get back into the more serious fishing season. True to the beach credo, I'll be using plugs. If I become desperate, I'll try the preseason bug route, but only after applying to the Committee for a waiver, something you neglected to do. Fishing with Oswald has clouded your judgement.

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Some shad around but not much else, still no bunker, just sporadic rainfish & spearing Water clarity just ok, water temp jumped a bit, chilly with the SSE wind

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8 hours ago, MC55 said:

So here's my take.  First, bass are strong swimmers and have no problem navigating rough water.  More opportunities to find food.  Second, a rolling surf is a map to reading the water.  How the waves break, where the washouts and rips set up gives you a real understanding of the structure to fish below the water.  Learn to read the water and you will be much more successful in finding more fish.

I understand the basics as far as how to identify Rips, sandbars, holes, troughs, cuts, etc… at least halfway decently. I guess what I’m asking is do you actually target the shallower flat rolling water because I was always under the assumption that those areas were not really ideal. How to tell bad shallow flat water from good shallow flat water? Whenever you say rolling white wash I get a lil confused because those areas I thought weren’t really prime. 

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21 mins ago, Wampire said:

I understand the basics as far as how to identify Rips, sandbars, holes, troughs, cuts, etc… at least halfway decently. I guess what I’m asking is do you actually target the shallower flat rolling water because I was always under the assumption that those areas were not really ideal. How to tell bad shallow flat water from good shallow flat water? Whenever you say rolling white wash I get a lil confused because those areas I thought weren’t really prime. 

Use the shallow flat water and follow it to the “shoulders” of the bar and start there. You usually want your cast to start on the bar and wash off into the shoulder, which is deeper and is a likely spot for bass to be. On an incoming tide that shallow flat water may be a few feet deep and bass will be in it eating sand bug and other bait.

Its easier to see them at night - IMO - because the contrast of white water to dark deeper water is more evident. 
Depending on how far out the tide is and the shallow water is, there may be a trough between the beach and the flat and deeper water on the offshore side of the bar. 
regardless, the best way to figure out the “good” ones is to fish them a bunch. 

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Posted (edited) · Report post

12 hours ago, richie c said:

 It was maybe 1967 and dad brought us kids to the inlet pretty often. There was a real loud mouth close by , every other word out of his mouth was a curse, who heaved a cast at a smaller boat who was going pretty fast IIRC and got hooked on it. He was cursing up a storm and everyone was laughing as he sliced the crap out of his hands trying to stop the spool. It was in my ''What I did for summer vacation'' school report...Dopes can also be very funny:laugh::laugh:

mid 1980s   I use to drift behind Barnegat inlet..  One saturday I was fishing and some clown who I had seen before flew by me and dang near capsized my boat.  I yelled for him to slow down and he turned and made another pass laughing all the way.  Well two week later I was out by Fort Dix at a yard sale and one guy had an empty LAWS rocket launcher tube.  I got it and put it on my boat.  I plugged the tube so it looked live.  Next week sure enough same boat and clowns headed at a high rate of speed and yep angled toward me.  I reached down, pulled out the tube and aimed.  Sure put the fear of God into them and they cut power and stayed a very long distance from me.  I guess it also resulted in them having to change their shorts too.  PayBacks are......

 

Edited by bill cunnane

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@Wampire I’m a skunk prone dummy but I have the most success in the surf by keeping it simple: 

 

Fish the cuts between the first bar and the lip at your feet. Fish it hard. Fish it straight in and also parallel to the sand. 
 

Good luck. 

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34 mins ago, nam1969 said:

Florida

The size of the blue fish in FL is the same size of an adult bunker in NJ.

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