ImBigNate

Looking to get into plug building

Rate this topic

11 posts in this topic

Posted (edited) · Report post

Hello im interested in getting into making plugs on my free time, all for use at some point just was wondering if there are any experienced plug makers out here willing to give me any tips they wish they knew when they started. Also a list of propper tools and what types of wood people use would help as well!

Edited by ImBigNate

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Run away, run away now, there is still time.

 

OK, don't say you weren't warned.

Just start reading this forum, every question you could have has been asked and answered many times, and you will find that there are often many ways to solve a problem.  This forum goes back to 2001 and there are many, many great builders who got their start here. As others will tell you, use the search feature when you have a question. You may want to start off with a plug building kit just to get acquainted with all the steps in the process and then start buying the tools you need. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Start with one plug type and get that down before you try another. Pick a plug that you use a lot. Maybe study various designs that are out there and figure out what the differences in design do for the action. If need be, clone your favorite. Once you have that down, try to tweak it to better work in the areas that you like to fish. You will get to the point where you will have confidence in the ones you make. Once you have that first one down, try another plug type and repeat the process. Don't worry about getting all fancy on your paint schemes when starting out. The basic colors: white, yellow, and black will do just fine. Rattle cans work just fine for this. If you want to get wild, try two tone schemes (e.g., yellow back, white belly). Ugly plugs that have good action will catch. Pretty plugs that don't swim right will waste space in your plug bag. You will waste some wood while learning the process. Starting out with some cheap dowels from Homies or Lowes will be fine and won't break the bank (just seal them well). Tools will depend somewhat on the types of plugs you want to try. The traditional surf plugs (metal lip, pencil, popper, etc.) can easily be done on a lathe. Red Fin and bomber type minnows, some shaping with a belt sander and then hand sand. Don't forget the safety gear too: respirator, face shield (for lathe). Be fore warned, it can be very addictive! Good luck! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
34 mins ago, Jig Man said:

Start with one plug type and get that down before you try another. Pick a plug that you use a lot. Maybe study various designs that are out there and figure out what the differences in design do for the action. If need be, clone your favorite. Once you have that down, try to tweak it to better work in the areas that you like to fish. You will get to the point where you will have confidence in the ones you make. Once you have that first one down, try another plug type and repeat the process. Don't worry about getting all fancy on your paint schemes when starting out. The basic colors: white, yellow, and black will do just fine. Rattle cans work just fine for this. If you want to get wild, try two tone schemes (e.g., yellow back, white belly). Ugly plugs that have good action will catch. Pretty plugs that don't swim right will waste space in your plug bag. You will waste some wood while learning the process. Starting out with some cheap dowels from Homies or Lowes will be fine and won't break the bank (just seal them well). Tools will depend somewhat on the types of plugs you want to try. The traditional surf plugs (metal lip, pencil, popper, etc.) can easily be done on a lathe. Red Fin and bomber type minnows, some shaping with a belt sander and then hand sand. Don't forget the safety gear too: respirator, face shield (for lathe). Be fore warned, it can be very addictive! Good luck! 

Thank you, your tips are greatly appreciated! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 5/4/2022 at 8:15 AM, Jig Man said:

Start with one plug type and get that down before you try another. Pick a plug that you use a lot. Maybe study various designs that are out there and figure out what the differences in design do for the action. If need be, clone your favorite. Once you have that down, try to tweak it to better work in the areas that you like to fish. You will get to the point where you will have confidence in the ones you make. Once you have that first one down, try another plug type and repeat the process. Don't worry about getting all fancy on your paint schemes when starting out. The basic colors: white, yellow, and black will do just fine. Rattle cans work just fine for this. If you want to get wild, try two tone schemes (e.g., yellow back, white belly). Ugly plugs that have good action will catch. Pretty plugs that don't swim right will waste space in your plug bag. You will waste some wood while learning the process. Starting out with some cheap dowels from Homies or Lowes will be fine and won't break the bank (just seal them well). Tools will depend somewhat on the types of plugs you want to try. The traditional surf plugs (metal lip, pencil, popper, etc.) can easily be done on a lathe. Red Fin and bomber type minnows, some shaping with a belt sander and then hand sand. Don't forget the safety gear too: respirator, face shield (for lathe). Be fore warned, it can be very addictive! Good luck! 

 

Great post! Covered everything I was going to say but much better. YoureBigNate heed Jigman's advice he's one of the longtime master luremakers active on this forum! 

 

Particularly second the safety gear. Don't want to breathe anything involved in plugmaking be it sawdust or epoxy fumes or spray paint. 

 

You can find answers to the other questions by searching this forum. You'll find list of tools. 

 

A couple good tools:

small scale measure .1 of a gram

calipers

box of disposable gloves

eventually, knipex roundnose pliers and vice grips

 

 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Do a search here, plus we halp you 

The one thing i will say is

Id aint got to be perty

As long as it has correct action for YOUR water and the type of plug you need all the flash will come with time.

Oh  ya paint it white for a swimmer and black for at night. Dont ferget yeller.  :D

 

 One other thing invest in good tools ,i usr sorby.  A gouge,  a skew 1 inch and a 1/2 inch skew

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I’m by no means an experienced builder but have learned a wealth of info on here since starting about a year ago. 
 

If you don’t want to get a lathe right away you can practice all the post-turning aspects of plug building with kits from Saltys Lure co.  That’s was got me hooked. 
 

Dont get a high end airbrush either they’re a waste for plugs IMO. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited) · Report post

TOOLS

#1 is a wood lathe. Doesn’t have to be a $$$ one. Some well known builders are working with the harbor freight special. Mine is a giant old us made delta from 1947. Got it for $300 on craigslist lol. 
#2 chisels for turning on the lathe. There’s a dizzying array of them. Let me make it easy: all you really need is a roughing gouge and a skew chisel.  

#3 aircraft (long) drill bits for through holes. Rig them up on the lathe with the proper chuck or on a floor standing drill press. Always drill from one side half way, then from the other side and meet holes in the middle. Sounds easy, but it’s going to take a lot of practice. Also brad point drill bits for belly holes/ weight holes, and forstner bits for eye holes if you want eyes. 
 

WOOD

It seems the three most popular woods are alaskan yellow cedar (ayc), maple, and birch… but you can use almost anything as long as you seal it well. You just need to experiment with this. You can make a plug of cedar, then make an exact clone of maple and the two could swim with a very different action. 
 

Speaking of sealing (this is very important), you’ll need epoxy for sealing and finishing. What kind? I don’t know lol. It’s a constant quest to find the best. There’s countless threads on here that discuss just that. Check them out and you’ll get a dozen kinds to try. Also research what folks on here refer to as “the sudsy method” (he’s a member on here)  of sealing with epoxy.  
 

good luck son. 

Edited by 1amson

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 5/7/2022 at 8:38 PM, bassmaster said:

Do a search here, plus we halp you 

The one thing i will say is

Id aint got to be perty

This is very true, just look at Bassmasters work :p

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to register here in order to participate.

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.