ProSkateFisherman

Anybody ever try a shad?

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Has anybody ever had the chance to eat a shad? Sometimes when I catch one I look at it and think "what do you taste like?" There was a point in time where you could keep them, I don't know when, but there was a time. So, has anybody ever tasted one? Was it any good if you did? 

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My father described them as: "Terrific."

 

Very delicate, the meat isn't dry or too moist, they take flavoring well.

Extremely bony however.

 

He said the Korean saying for shad was: "Even if it's rotten - it's shad."

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Just now, Saltfruit said:

My father described them as: "Terrific."

 

Very delicate, the meat isn't dry or too moist, they take flavoring well.

Extremely bony however.

 

He said the Korean saying for shad was: "Even if it's rotten - it's shad."

I’d imagine they’re bony. Just based off of cutting up bunker. Super bony. Maybe one day I’ll get to taste one. 

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You can pressure can them. We usually put Dill, Onion, Lemon slices and Chili Peppers....add a bit of salt and go. The key to minimizing the fishy smell/flavor is to bleed and ice immediately.  Fillet them off the backbone, skin them then removing any red or gray meat. Great for a Tuna substitute.  They do have a unique flavor though.

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26 mins ago, Derick Jahnke said:

You can pressure can them. We usually put Dill, Onion, Lemon slices and Chili Peppers....add a bit of salt and go. The key to minimizing the fishy smell/flavor is to bleed and ice immediately.  Fillet them off the backbone, skin them then removing any red or gray meat. Great for a Tuna substitute.  They do have a unique flavor though.

Where are you able to keep shad? Sounds like you have them every now and then. West coast? I agree with the bleeding.  Most important part in preparing any fish that you are going to eat IMO.

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1 hour ago, ProSkateFisherman said:

Where are you able to keep shad? Sounds like you have them every now and then. West coast? I agree with the bleeding.  Most important part in preparing any fish that you are going to eat IMO.

Columbia river....we get close to 10 million a year..no limit on keeping, though it's mostly used for Crab and White Sturgeon bait.

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Posted (edited) · Report post

One of the BIGGEST culinary disappointments of my life.  I was in Philly this time of year and a well-regarded seafood restaurant had a special dinner of shad roe and shad fillet. After years of reading folks waxing poetic of the exquisite nature of both shad roe and fillets in all the hoity toity gourmet publications, I was excited to have my first taste of each.

 

The shad roe was fine, tasting just like the weakfish roe I would eat in my early 20s during the 70s boom on LI, so it was a bit of a let down, as I expected something significantly different and better than the weakfish.  Well let me tell you about the shad fillet.  Shad is in the herring family, right?  Yup, it has that oily herring taste to it.  Mind you it wasn't bad, just way overhyped by food writers.  I was expecting pure culinary bliss, but got a nice piece of fish. 

 

I love to eat all kinds of fish, but it seems to me that food writers like to over hype things.  I got suckered into having grilled herring once at a fancy Portland restaurant that I do enjoy, because I had recently read that grilled herring is a wonderful treat.  Worse than the shad, best used as bass and lobster bait...

 

IMO, the taste of shad isn't worth the agita of filleting one.  Keep the roe, wrap it in bacon and fry it up for a nice treat...

Edited by Roccus7

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Recipe for shad -

split/butterfly shad and place on a cedar plank. 

rub butter, salt and pepper on shad. 

place plank on a medium hot grill, shad facing up. Cover grill. 

In about 18 min. remove shad from the plank, throw away the shad and eat the plank. 

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It's actually legit amazing smoked. As good as Smoked Columbia River Spring Chinook Salmon.....but that goes for upwards of 50 dollars a pound. Shad is free and plentiful.

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2 hours ago, Catskill John said:

Recipe for shad -

split/butterfly shad and place on a cedar plank. 

rub butter, salt and pepper on shad. 

place plank on a medium hot grill, shad facing up. Cover grill. 

In about 18 min. remove shad from the plank, throw away the shad and eat the plank. 

I hope this joke never dies 

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40 mins ago, Saltfruit said:

I hope this joke never dies 

Normally it’s with carp. First I’ve heard it with shad. Gets me almost every time when somebody tells me how to cook a carp. 

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14 mins ago, ProSkateFisherman said:

Normally it’s with carp. First I’ve heard it with shad. Gets me almost every time when somebody tells me how to cook a carp. 

I use the same recipe for bluefish, but I marinate the blue filet for 24 hrs first and then baste the filet liberally until the marinate sinks into the plank.  Easier on the teeth that way, lol.

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6 hours ago, Roccus7 said:

One of the BIGGEST culinary disappointments of my life. 

100% concur

6 hours ago, Roccus7 said:

IMO, the taste of shad isn't worth the agita of filleting one. 

And again. 

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2 hours ago, ProSkateFisherman said:

Normally it’s with carp. First I’ve heard it with shad. Gets me almost every time when somebody tells me how to cook a carp. 

 

Preparing carp takes knowledge and skills.

 

 

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25 mins ago, Popasilov said:

 

Preparing carp takes knowledge and skills.

 

 

I’ve heard stories about people keeping them for a week in their tub. They bring the carp home and put it in their tub to “flush out” the mud or something that’s inside of them that makes them taste bad. Every morning they drain the water, now dirty and muddy, and fill it up with new water, until the water is no longer dirty. Then they prepare and consume the carp. Or something like that. I don’t think I’d ever eat one, just because it’s too much of a hassle from what I’ve heard. I’d rather just catch a couple crappie and fry them up. I’m sure with the right person cooking and preparing the carp it could taste amazing.

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