Sngl2th

Long-term fly tying chemical safety

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23 posts in this topic

Same here. Huffing toluene is better for you than driving the TPK from exit 12 to 14.

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On 3/3/2022 at 8:34 PM, BrianBM said:

Flies will  be at their stinkiest when the solvents and glues are curing. Once dry, I don't notice a smell.

You are not a fish :)

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On 3/4/2022 at 1:38 PM, saltyh2ofly said:

I've lived in New Jersey my whole life so I'm immune.

Or already screwed. 

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3 hours ago, baldwin said:

Or already screwed. 

No, I'm preserved.........oh I worked in a pharmaceutical plant for 26yrs that was literally by its nature a chemical plant! I'm not worried Hahahahahahahahahahahahaha :)

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The worst thing that’s ever happened to me was I go some super glue in my eye… I was tying a articulated fly and I was flying the wire to connect the hooked down and I did some security wraps when the glue was still wet. My thread hit the point of the hook and it flicked a small amount in my eye. HIGHLY do not recommend this!!! Basically I held my eye open and washed it out with loads of water and contact solution.

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Posted (edited)

Interesting. I have always avoided Softex partly because of the toluene, but more so because my wife screams bloody murder  when ANYTHING smells. 

 

(She could detect a nanogram of perfume at 100 yards, OUTDOORS!)

 

What surprises me are the complaints about UV resins. Granted I've only used Solarez and I always thought there was a mild odor but it dissipated very quickly.

 

I've also used standard lacquer based head cement forever. I'm going to try switching to Sally Hansen's but it's not like that smells any better.

Edited by C. Regalis

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On 3/2/2022 at 11:10 AM, theshadow said:

When the weather allows the benches are on casters so they get wheeled out to the driveway.

I've visited your shop, and I can't believe you can get those benches outside. Obviously they must not be built as one long section.

 

I also didn't know you took all those precautions, especially with natural materials (Although I completely get the cork and especially the foam plug cutting measures).

 

That's all pretty serious stuff, but for anyone who ties and builds as much as you do, it makes a lot of sense.

 

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12 hours ago, C. Regalis said:

I've visited your shop, and I can't believe you can get those benches outside. Obviously they must not be built as one long section.

 

I also didn't know you took all those precautions, especially with natural materials (Although I completely get the cork and especially the foam plug cutting measures).

 

That's all pretty serious stuff, but for anyone who ties and builds as much as you do, it makes a lot of sense.

 

The benches inside the shop stay inside.The benches in the garage split[designed that way] and are on casters.The rod lathe[12'] is mounted on a 1x13' piece of pine board.I just move it off the 14' bench in the shop and clamp it to the separated benches in the spot where the queen parks her car in the garage or actually out in the driveway if she's barking at me.I've noticed this past winter even putting finish on guides[Pro-Kote] in the shop it effects my  left eye situation when applying and mixing.Getting older lots more seems to "bother" me.[Don't ask about driving:laugh:].

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