hurricane1091

Kayaks???

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4 mins ago, EricDice said:

And for @hurricane1091 and all the other yakkers or boaters, don’t discount your drysuit or wetsuit needs. Could save your life. Sadly at least one or two navy seals have been lost on kayaks in the time I’ve been paying attention and those guys are hard compared with my soft @$$  

Oh for sure. So a couple fellows died in the big D in November right by my house. Small boat that capsized. One was found, the other two not so much. I didn't take my skiff out after that happened. The week before I towed it down the shore and the forecast didn't exactly match reality. Sat there for 45 mins. Didn't see anyone launch or anyone out. Didn't even bother launching myself, came home instead. 

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Yeah, boating or kayaking is all a matter of calculated safety. Prepare for the worst. Gotta admit that’s one of the things that has kept me away from it. I have been out on our yak a number of times, but I definitely realized that I’m not “prepped up” enough to say I’m actually prepared & equipped for disaster. So, that yak awaits the day when I can accomplish that prep work & spare the cash from the family budget for a good drysuit or wetsuit. (I am leery of waders & a surf top.)

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Fishing is pretty GD good no matter the MO. 

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1 hour ago, SnoozeFishing said:

I think that a lot of times is what separates the die hard surf guys from the boat guys. I love torturing myself and not catching for a week but when I do it's magical and I feel much more accomplished. Some of my friends will take me on their boat and troll and have a blast while I'm sitting there wondering why anyone would think this was better than surf fishing. My goal is to find the ONE fish of my life, and if I did that on a boat it would be pointless to me. 

It's like we're all on this wide spectrum from grabbing a fish with your hands to ordering it in a restaurant! We all find of the spot that makes us happy.

 

I was honestly surprised at the crap I caught asking whether it was worth it to go on a halibut boat in Alaska. I did and it was as meh an experience as I expected.  Having someone drive the boat to where the fish are, drop the bait, and hand me a hooked up rod to be a human winch did not feel like fishing.

 

Even the segments where I jigged halibut and rockfish didn't feel as victorious as finding fluke from my kayak where no one else fishes. We like challenges or we wouldn't keep doing it. I was truly baffled by the Texans on my boat who were on their third day at it.

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On 2/13/2022 at 8:12 PM, hurricane1091 said:

I mostly would use this out back in the sod country from St Patrick's day til whenever I get me another boat. Could go into fluke season but hopefully not.

 

 

When fishing in the back of LIS the paddle yak gets the nod and the Hobie stays home. Less is more in that scenario. If you fish at anchor  or troll with rodholders does it matter if the yak is paddle or pedal?

  Kayaks are prep and work, but the results are priceless.  
For years I threw plugs and bloodworms from the shore of a nearby tidal river and sometimes caught a bass. On my last trip there on 1-2-22, my buddy and I each released over 40 decent fish. The landlubbers at the launch we’re feeding expensive bloodworms to white perch and catfish. 

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Posted (edited)

20 hours ago, gellfex said:

Would you say everyone who surf fishes does it because they can't afford a boat? Some, but some who do have a boat choose to surf fish sometimes. There's guys here with boats who kayak sometimes. It's a different experience. I could afford a boat, but I prefer to paddle kayak. I'll never rule out a pedal kayak or a motorboat, but for now it's what I like. The OP likes to stand in a motorboat. All good.

I didn’t say everyone but I would say a lot of people surf fish because they can’t afford a boat and I would agree that some boat owners also surf fish. Yes there are guys with kayaks and boats but you have to agree with my initial comment that a lot of people buy kayaks because it’s the cheapest way to get on the water. sure there are people who like kayaking and dislike power boats but can afford both but this, I think, would be a limited group. 
 

human behavior is a funny thing. Guys who drop a K on a reel will never ever say the reel sucks. Guys who spend 300 bucks on pliers will never ever say they suck or they do exactly what a 10 dollar pair does. Likewise, Guys who can’t afford a boat but bought a kayak will never say fishing from a kayak sucks. There are of course exceptions to everything but I like banking on the odds. 
 

don’t get me wrong, I would fish from a kayak in fresh water if the air and water temp were 80 degrees, there was little current, little wind, no water skiers or jet skis, there was a bathroom on board, I didn’t have to tie everything down, the seating was comfortable, I could get up and walk around or lay down and take a nap, I didn’t have to wear a PFD, I could get out of the sun and I could fish where I wanted and not where I could reasonably get to, and I didn’t have a boat

Edited by poopdeck

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40 mins ago, poopdeck said:

I didn’t say everyone but I would say a lot of people surf fish because they can’t afford a boat

It would be fascinating to poll the fishermen here, no doubt. The SOL members are not a representative sample of all beach fishermen. I bet at least half who don't have a boat could afford one.

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2 hours ago, gellfex said:

It would be fascinating to poll the fishermen here, no doubt. The SOL members are not a representative sample of all beach fishermen. I bet at least half who don't have a boat could afford one.

But there’s that human nature factor I talked about. How do you determine how many are just going to say they can afford a boat but choose to surf fish. Plus, everybody can afford a boat but other priorities may put the boat on hold. With that said I think your guesstimate of half is probably about right. 

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2 hours ago, gellfex said:

It would be fascinating to poll the fishermen here, no doubt. The SOL members are not a representative sample of all beach fishermen. I bet at least half who don't have a boat could afford one.

It's really none of my business what someone's motivation are and I don't really like to speak for other people. I think many people here live within a stones throw of the beach and it's practical to go out before or after work for a bit on the beach during the striper runs. Not really so much from a boat. So like that makes a ton of sense to surf fish a ton. I fish from the land still, Jim Hutchinson has a boat and fishes from land still, my kayak friend fishes from land still. There's definitely some people like that. I think most of the beach folks either don't have a tow vehicle, don't have a spot to keep their boat, don't have the money for the boat they'd want, don't want to deal with the upkeep, don't like being on the water, etc etc. Everyone's got their motivations, nothing really wrong with that I say. I think it's fair to say fishing from some sort of vessel can be more productive just based on covering more ground and different structure, but you're in it for $20 to launch + whatever gas you burn + whatever your time is worth for the time it takes to clean the boat. I can totally see why someone wouldn't want to get into it.

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Since we're ranting, I never understand how people tuna fish. I guess these people are rich because nevermind the cost of the boat, the cost of bait and fuel alone for a trip out is a small fortune. I personally have no desire to drive 75 mins to the shore and then drive another 2-3 hours offshore to catch some tuna. That said, I recently learned about the ghost tuna fishery that set up shop in December the past handful of years. That sounds exciting and more reasonable. To anyone who may tuna fish though and reads this, I will go with you and pay my way still :)

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13 mins ago, hurricane1091 said:

Since we're ranting, I never understand how people tuna fish. I guess these people are rich because nevermind the cost of the boat, the cost of bait and fuel alone for a trip out is a small fortune. I personally have no desire to drive 75 mins to the shore and then drive another 2-3 hours offshore to catch some tuna. That said, I recently learned about the ghost tuna fishery that set up shop in December the past handful of years. That sounds exciting and more reasonable. To anyone who may tuna fish though and reads this, I will go with you and pay my way still :)

Yeah, exactly what I was ranting about further up regarding the halibut fishing, 3 hrs out and back! I was thinking about how much fuel was being burned that August day all up and down that Alaska coast to give tourists a bent rod to winch or a view of glaciers and whales. 

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The gents from south of the border have figured this corundum out. In LIS they pile 3-4 guys in an inflatable raft or on a tandem yak. Get out to some rocks or an oyster bed, and set up shop for a day of fishing. 
YF from a yak is like pure IV heroin.

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I have a boat and a kayak.....have fished from both for years.......love the boat for taking family and friends out...  for me the thrill of the hunt, challenge and physical demands of catching a nice fish from the kayak is more work and .... more rewarding.

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If OP is still thinking of getting a "temporary" yak, just go cheaper.  Paddling and fishing really isn't all that bad.  It's also a great small water option.  I would think if you get the yak, use it, and eventually get your new boat, there will be times you'll want to just grab the yak and go.  There's an intimacy with fishing from a kayak that isn't realized until experienced. 

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11 hours ago, hurricane1091 said:

Since we're ranting, I never understand how people tuna fish. I guess these people are rich because nevermind the cost of the boat, the cost of bait and fuel alone for a trip out is a small fortune. I personally have no desire to drive 75 mins to the shore and then drive another 2-3 hours offshore to catch some tuna. That said, I recently learned about the ghost tuna fishery that set up shop in December the past handful of years. That sounds exciting and more reasonable. To anyone who may tuna fish though and reads this, I will go with you and pay my way still :)

 

The ghost fishing is by far the most frustrating tuna fishery we have.  If you find bluefin crashing the surface mid-offshore your chances of hooking up are pretty good.  Same feed a mile off the beach?  You're lucky to hook up in 1 in 20 even with a perfect cast in all of them.  Oh yea and its usually brutally cold and you're sitting/standing on the bow running pretty much full throttle.

 

Last year was a bit of an exception, there were so many around and so many guys went for them that I think it looked easy to people seeing the reports.  Its usually a crapshoot, and I'm fishing with guys who know the game very well.  I think I went 4 or 5 times, probably landed 50 or so perfects casts into big feeds, not a bump.  I'll take the 2-3 hour runs spring through fall any day.

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