codfish

Jig heads and getting snagged in the Canal

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17 mins ago, codfish said:

This is for the Canal sharpies of which am not one of them:)

Is there a style of Jig heads that does not snag as much in the canal??

savage-savage-gear-75-sand-eel.jpg

P1280392-600x450 (3).jpg

Two more samples

s-l1600.jpg

41xTDBki4xL._SR600,315_PIWhiteStrip,BottomLeft,0,35_SCLZZZZZZZ_FMpng_BG255,255,255.png

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They all snag :). It depends on what you snag as well. Old ghost traps, wire, rope, rocks vegetation etc. 

 

I like Joe Baggs the best because they have never let me down. I have seen way too many other brands with hooks pulled straight. 
 

I prefer my leader to my the weak point on my jigging set up that way when I do break off I don’t lose braid. 60# mono for me. 
 

I think you should accept you will lose gear and work the jig where the fish are, on or near the bottom. 

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Posted (edited) · Report post

Codfish,

 

Every style jig will eventually hang up.  It's not so much the jig style, but rather operator error. 

I.e.

Are you throwing a 5-6oz when a 3oz is more than enough?  Lots of guys think you're supposed to "hold the bottom" with your jig, so they throw stuff that's way too heavy.   Your jig should bounce,  skip along the bottom. If possible, when I've completed about half of my drift, I'll often dump 15-20' of line, just to reconnect with the bottom.

 

Certain jig style sink at a much faster rate than others.  I really like the "ball style" jig in your last photo. Casts beautifully. Due to it's compact design, it sinks fast.  That's important since it doesn't have to be cast up currently as much as say, a Savage style head.

B-ware Bernie makes an excellent head, and it's one of my go to jigs. Bullhead style, good hook, sinks fast.

 

I find Savage heads seem to rise in the water column.  Savages are very effective, but speaking for myself, I find I need often fish one about 1-2oz heavier than one of Bernie's, or a ball head.

Another factor is the overall size of your plastic. I prefer a short, thicker profile plastic.   That's one of the reasons why I pour my own. That, and I can pour my super, double secret proprietory colors. :ballgag:

 

 

Edited by bob_G

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3 mins ago, bob_G said:

Codfish,

 

Every style jig will eventually hang up.  It's not so much the jug style, but rather operator error. 

I.e.

Are you throwing a 5-6oz when a 3oz is more than enough?  Lots of guys think you're supposed to "hold the bottom" with your jig, so they throw stuff that way too heavy.   Your jig should bounce, it skip along the bottom. If possible, when I've completed about half of my drift, I'll often dump 15-20' of line, just to reconnect with the bottom.

 

Certain jig style sink at a much faster rate than others.  I really like the "ball style" jig in your last photo. Casts beautifully. Due to it's compact design, it sinks fast.  That's important since it doesn't have to be cast up currently as much as say, a Savage style head.

B-ware Bernie makes an excellent head, and it's one of my go to jigs. Bullhead style, good hook, sinks fast.

 

I find Savage heads seem to rise in the water column.  Savages are very effective, but speaking for myself, I find I need often fish one about 1-2oz heavier than one of Bernie's, or a ball head.

Another factor is the overall size of your plastic. I prefer a short, thicker profile plastic.   That's one of the reasons why I pour my own. That, and I can pour my super, double secret proprietors colors. :ballgag:

 

 

Thanks for sharing:) do you have a picture of jig heads made by Bernie?

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3 mins ago, codfish said:

Thanks for sharing:) do you have a picture of jig heads made by Bernie?

Codfish,

If you go back to your photos,  it's the third from the top.  Nothing super fancy, just a versatile jig, that works well under a variety of applications, like sluggos, fin s, shads, savages and hurleys.

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One thing Bob G mentioned, I use the lightest jig that gets me to the bottom. A lot of guys are using 5oz when I am using 2. 
 

I change weights fairly often as the current speed changes. 
 

You will lose gear, it’s part of the game. 

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Posted (edited) · Report post

1 hour ago, codfish said:

Two more samples

 

41xTDBki4xL._SR600,315_PIWhiteStrip,BottomLeft,0,35_SCLZZZZZZZ_FMpng_BG255,255,255.png

Codfish,

 

I really like this jig style, but only under certain conditions.  I have these in 1.75oz with a nice stainless hook.   I'll often switch over to this jig on the very end of a tide. The flat head catches the current, and drifts real nice, and extends the tide.

Also this is a nice jig for bucktail. I tie them in a few different colors. Fish them naked, no pork rind. Some nights when they're on small bait and picky, this jig can be a game changer.

BTW, the hook in your photo is kind of lame.  You need a forged or a stainless hook.

Edited by bob_G

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One suggestion is to spend time with different combinations of line size/type, weight, and paddletail size to have it swim properly with the current.  As the current slows, change your bait...

 

Yes those sure do look familiar!  I've collected quite a few from my lobster traps.  I've had instances where it's clear the poor soul on the rocks is casting,  gets snagged, breaks off, ties on the exact same jig (maybe a different colored paddletail) and snags my trap again.  Finding two Al Gags with the same braid and leader attached......  it can get expensive!

 

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2 hours ago, ged said:

They all snag :). It depends on what you snag as well. Old ghost traps, wire, rope, rocks vegetation etc. 

 

I like Joe Baggs the best because they have never let me down. I have seen way too many other brands with hooks pulled straight. 
 

I prefer my leader to my the weak point on my jigging set up that way when I do break off I don’t lose braid. 60# mono for me. 
 

I think you should accept you will lose gear and work the jig where the fish are, on or near the bottom. 

"It depends on what you snag as well.":) 

download (34).jpg

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5 hours ago, bob_G said:

It's not so much the jig style, but rather operator error. 

This.

 

I see guys throw the same weight, same jig for an entire tide, and at different locations.

 

No Bueno. 

 

Depending on current and spot, I'll throw anywhere from 1 to 5oz. Gotta get down *to* the bottom to be effective, but don't bulldoze it. 

 

There's also areas where you can be more aggressive, and super bony areas you have to time your drops right..or face high risk of snag.

 

If you're bulldozing and hanging up, best check your hook points and leaders right away. No sense throwing something with a blunted tip and scuffed out leader. Just leads to missed fish and popped line. 

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27 mins ago, rst3 said:

 

 

If you're bulldozing and hanging up, best check your hook points and leaders right away. No sense throwing something with a blunted tip and scuffed out leader. Just leads to missed fish and popped line. 

This is how I keep my hooks razor sharp.

 

IMG_20210810_104647.jpg

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