Steve_M

Winterizing

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Do I have to fog my Honda 150? A guy was saying being it’s only sitting for 10/12 weeks I don’t have do anything. Just get the water out of everything. I always pay for winterizing.

Edited by Steve_M

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Probably not.  Wouldn't hurt to pull the plugs, squirt some light oil in, and turn her over a bit with the plugs out if nervous.  

 

And drain the carbs, or at a minimum, make sure you have liberally stabilized fuel in them

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I think it’s fuel injected. It just seem to be a lot of money for nothing. They charged around $600 to winterize and put the shrink wrap. The shrink wrap was $300

Edited by Steve_M

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Outboard motors are self draining so there’s no need to get the water out of anything. It gets out all on its own. The need to fog the cylinders for such short winters has always been debated and I know some people, including an outboard mechanic, who have never fogged their cylinders without issue. 

 

I fill my tank and treat with sea foam. I run the motor for 10 minutes to get the treated gas through the system.  I pull each plug, spray some fogging oil in each cylinder and then turn the fly wheel a few times to pump the cylinders a few times to distribute the oil. I fill my oil tank, clean and check my batteries and plug them in. 
 

that’s it. That’s all I have ever done in 30 years of boat ownership. Never had an issue with starting or running come spring. Not saying this is the right way or the best way. It’s just my way and it has worked for me for decades. I own a 1991 carbureted 115 two stroke so I can’t speak for these new massive supersized four strokes out there but I would assume the principle is the same. 

Edited by poopdeck

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9 hours ago, poopdeck said:

Outboard motors are self draining so there’s no need to get the water out of anything. It gets out all on its own. The need to fog the cylinders for such short winters has always been debated and I know some people, including an outboard mechanic, who have never fogged their cylinders without issue. 

 

I fill my tank and treat with sea foam. I run the motor for 10 minutes to get the treated gas through the system.  I pull each plug, spray some fogging oil in each cylinder and then turn the fly wheel a few times to pump the cylinders a few times to distribute the oil. I fill my oil tank, clean and check my batteries and plug them in. 
 

that’s it. That’s all I have ever done in 30 years of boat ownership. Never had an issue with starting or running come spring. Not saying this is the right way or the best way. It’s just my way and it has worked for me for decades. I own a 1991 carbureted 115 two stroke so I can’t speak for these new massive supersized four strokes out there but I would assume the principle is the same. 

Thanks. Next year I’m going to try this myself. 

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Couple other things to consider depending on your boat/motor. I always changed the lower unit oil on the motor, and at least drained the fuel/water separator if not replaced it to get any water out. 

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12 hours ago, Steve_M said:

I think it’s fuel injected. It just seem to be a lot of money for nothing. They charged around $600 to winterize and put the shrink wrap. The shrink wrap was $300

OK, same difference.

Dose it with stable, drain your VST tank

Pull plugs, spray fogging oil, turn over, replace plugs

 

Done

What do they charge to just 'winterize' now out of curiosity?  OK nevermind I should read.

 

Yeah...its not hard, why piss away cash?

Edited by makorider

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8 hours ago, Good2Go said:

Couple other things to consider depending on your boat/motor. I always changed the lower unit oil on the motor, and at least drained the fuel/water separator if not replaced it to get any water out. 

I forgot about the lower unit gear oil. Absolutely you should change this out as well. It’s equally as simple to do as fogging the cylinders. I forgot about the lower unit since I have a jet and have no gear oil to change. 

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On 1/26/2022 at 8:42 PM, makorider said:

Probably not.  Wouldn't hurt to pull the plugs, squirt some light oil in, and turn her over a bit with the plugs out if nervous.  

 

And drain the carbs, or at a minimum, make sure you have liberally stabilized fuel in them

Not sure about a Honda but my Yamaha gets turned over with the plugs in. The oil may not be forced into, around, and past the rings if the plugs are out.

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A word of warning on stabilizing the fuel.  I always have stabilized my fuel and also use ethanol free gas in FL. This past year I used some stabil that I had from the previous year, Well after many years of no issues,this year engine wouldn't start and kept bogging down. My mechanic said the fuel was messed up.  Engine ran fine before being stored. The only thing it could be is old stabilizer.  I will now buy new each year.  My boat shop fogged the engine and checked everything before storing.  I have used these guys for almost 15yrs and they know what they are doing.

 

Just thought I'd pass that along.  It was expensive to drain tank and clearing the Carbs and fuel lines etc.

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^ great recommendation.  
 

i also put my plugs back in and hand turn my fly wheel to distribute the fogging oil. No reason other than that’s what I do. 

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Yamaha winterizing instructions states you put Ring Free, EFI Fogging Oil, and Stabilizer in a separate small tank with fresh gas and run it 10 minutes.  I don't own a 4 stroke but I've always pulled my plugs on all my 2 stroke engines and fogged. When I move to a 4 stroke I think I'll pull the plugs and fog the cylinder out of habit.

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