Jig Man

gliders

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138 posts in this topic

12 mins ago, aae0130 said:

Just watch those fingers……..

Yeah I’m trying to keep the 10 I have. I was already thinking of attempting to make some type of jig to hold a blank. 

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3 mins ago, eelbasher said:

Yeah I’m trying to keep the 10 I have. I was already thinking of attempting to make some type of jig to hold a blank. 

I tried it a few times with some 6 inch blanks and had them grab and pull….I have big fingers and poor sight……not for me. 

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I recently bought some Raptor gliders because (1) I’m curious about gliders and am trying to build a knowledge base and (2) they were really cheap. When they arrived, I was surprised to discover that, except for some rudimentary face detail, they are totally flat. They are plastic, but I could make the same thing in wood by just cutting them out with a band saw. Haven’t had a chance to try them yet, but should be interesting. I’ve wondered whether edge rounding makes anything but an aesthetic difference.

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3 hours ago, eelbasher said:

Yeah I’m trying to keep the 10 I have. I was already thinking of attempting to make some type of jig to hold a blank. 

There are some table saw tools out there that work pretty well for keeping your fingers further away from the whirling blades of death, the GRRipper is one. Soft grippy pads hold the piece, and your hand is a couple of inches further away from being hamburger.GRRRipper.jpeg.9006e77b79059ff2cf3a7fc1d4036b5b.jpeg

I thought it was a little goofy when I saw it, but I bought one when I got my table saw. 

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29 mins ago, Ed White said:

There are some table saw tools out there that work pretty well for keeping your fingers further away from the whirling blades of death, the GRRipper is one. Soft grippy pads hold the piece, and your hand is a couple of inches further away from being hamburger.GRRRipper.jpeg.9006e77b79059ff2cf3a7fc1d4036b5b.jpeg

I thought it was a little goofy when I saw it, but I bought one when I got my table saw. 

I just watched a video on the tube and that is actually pretty cool. Does a ton of stuff. Impressive to say the least. Thanks for the heads up on that

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5 hours ago, TopStriperAngler said:

@Jig Man  did you ever try making a glider and then putting a lip on it? Not a metalip but lexan or what not.  

 

53 mins ago, Punch63 said:

A glider has its own action, putting a lip on it would defeat that action

Agree with punch on this. On a lipped plug I would also want the tail and nose tapered more. 

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Posted (edited) · Report post

The  flat sides and wide bottom plane are what gives a glider that action. The weight is for balance and to add momentum to it…… 

Edited by aae0130

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I tried reading about the physics involved in plugs when I was making gliders and some big spooks last summer and having crazy time casting them. Forgot everything I sort of learned. It would be fun to investigate the physics of these plugs though. 

 

I'd like to hear some advice on building gliders that don't have a swim but that have to be worked like a spook to get them to turn. 

 

That's actually the kind of glider I would like to make. Jerry ------- can't remember his name called them stickbait style gliders I think.    

 

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I'd like to add to the discussion that using the glider weighting scheme Jigman has outlined as a starting point--mainly the idea of getting a nearly-level maybe slightly-tail-down sink using two nearly equal weights--you can make a good lipless minnow that has a bit of a zig zag swim depending on shape. 

 

The minnow side of things is a flat bottom with a curved top. And shaped generally like a minnow lipped plug but not round in cross section more like a rectangular or even square cross section with edges all rounded off. 

 

They don't walk wide but they do do other interesting things. Generally, narrower in action to very narrow in action. With these flat bottomed lipless minnow-gliders the shape of the back or top of the plug seems to play an important role in getting it to dive. Which can be useful when fishing in the surf and trying to get a plug under in the undertow. 

 

Still working on these but its something to look at. 

 

Made all these using pine board, not round stock. They all have mostly flat sides so not exactly shaped like minnows but hard to tell when looking at them. 

 

  

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TSA, that minnow type one sounds like a stick bait. Sweep the rod tip and they have a nice swimming action to them. I've been messing with them some lately too. Your suggestions seem right on for those plugs. Big difference is that on the stick bait you want the lead in the center of the plug around the balance point. Also the shape differences that you mention. The weight in this case provides a pivot point for the plug to rotate around.

 

The info I gave above for gliders will get you one that walks. The walk seems to be easier to get with the thinner, top to bottom, gliders than for ones with more of a drop belly.

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