Jig Man

gliders

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Vertical Glider: inspired by Bigred's soft plastic bait and a wide profile flounder fly I had luck on in winter, I tried a flounder shape plug. From the top looks like a tear drop or sculpin rather than a flounder. From the side it has a flat bottom and a rounded top tapering back to a raised fin-like tail. I weighted it using according to Jigman's scheme for gliders. I was just hoping for something that would dive when jerked and then swim up on the retrieve. But this proto turned out to have an up/down gliding swim. Maybe dives a foot before coming back up. Unfortunately fish don't seem interested in it but an interesting result nonetheless.   

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19 mins ago, TopStriperAngler said:

Vertical Glider: inspired by Bigred's soft plastic bait and a wide profile flounder fly I had luck on in winter, I tried a flounder shape plug. From the top looks like a tear drop or sculpin rather than a flounder. From the side it has a flat bottom and a rounded top tapering back to a raised fin-like tail. I weighted it using according to Jigman's scheme for gliders. I was just hoping for something that would dive when jerked and then swim up on the retrieve. But this proto turned out to have an up/down gliding swim. Maybe dives a foot before coming back up. Unfortunately fish don't seem interested in it but an interesting result nonetheless.   

Post some pics please, I was just playing around with something very similar.  I’ll post up my experiment as well.  It was a flop but a good learning experience.

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Posted (edited)

I was just hoping for a plug that would dive when jerked the up and down motion on steady retrieve was surprise. Sinks tail down about 20 degrees. The bulbous tailfin wasn't for looks but to get a bit of buoyancy back there to hold tail a bit higher. Not certain but I think a flat belly(despite photo the belly is perfectly flat) and a rounded back promotes dive as in a darter or a lot of minnow plugs via the plug being tilted slightly nose down tail up. This plug will stick to the surface at a high rate of retrieve though. I am going to try a small horizontal tail fin made out of metal on this and see what that does. I'm thinkin if I turn it down maybe something cool.   

 

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Edited by TopStriperAngler

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Pretty cool that you were able to get it to swim up/down, I can't think of any other bait that does that.

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Posted (edited)

5 hours ago, Ed White said:

Pretty cool that you were able to get it to swim up/down, I can't think of any other bait that does that.

Yeah I was pleasantly surprised to see that. Maybe its the tail fin nub that helps. I tried out the horizontal tailfins yesterday and another surprise they were very effective. Turned it into a darter basically. Pretty small little pieces of metal. If u bent the metal upwards the lure would hop out of the water on the retrieve--a frog? Need to research the muskie-pike plugs that use this tailfin arrangement.   

Edited by TopStriperAngler

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I been making some mini gliders 3" long out of 1/2" pine. Shapes mostly end up about a calculated 15g saltwater sink weight (dunk in SW on a scale) and I have decided that 25g is my an adequate weight for casting purposes. The best true glider with a walk has been a slightly fattened version of the classic lengthened egg or spoon shape where the widest part is right in middle of plug. Other ones wwith smaller profile don't go as wide but still swim.

 

I also made a few from 3/4" pine using the same stencils. These I tapered quite a bit on the sides. They have a kind of random swim going side to side and up and down and every direction in between sometimes coming to surface. Not as nice really. 

 

One other note on some of these I found that moving the screw eye further up the nose led to the plug staying on surface rather than diving as I was expecting. Keeping the screw eye down toward centerline seemed to work better. I don't know why.    

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Posted (edited)

Doing a post here about processing these glider shapes I been making in case anyone has feedback or thoughts. These are all 3" cut from 1/2" pine. I make a photocopy of them after shaping and then make notes as I get their saltwater displacement(sink weight) and balance them in a bucket of saltwater. I use glue gun to attach weights. I count the hook, swivel, and belly screw eye against the weight I want in the front of the plug. These screw eyes are about 1 gram. All these weights are grams.  

 

Triangle=weight of plug with screw eyes and hook

Circle=saltwater displacement(weight it would sink at in saltwater basically)

Square=final weight after epoxying

 

Except for the biggest one these all cast pretty dang well. They don't all stay under the surface all the time. The one on the top left does stay under pretty good. Been catching on a few of these on schoolies kind of similar to a small waxwing @t_man7. Straight retrieve or working them with steady jerking and slow retrieve sometimes mixed with a straight retrieve.  

 

I decided like 26g is about perfect for casting and going forward I'll just rig 'em and then add weight to get somewhere around 25-7g. 1.5 grams for epoxy I guess. The one on the lower right is too light doesn't cast so good. 

 

All my larger gliders are way lighter for their volumes. 

 

Top right glider I drilled the weight holes past the centerline. Want to see what would happen. Nothing really good. A little unstable. 

 

 

447789.jpg

Edited by TopStriperAngler

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Just a thought, something Jigman mentioned earlier, I moved the rear belly weights closer to the hook hole, helped the swim. But that was on the body shape I'm using.

Keep on testing.....

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Posted (edited)

2 hours ago, Ed White said:

Just a thought, something Jigman mentioned earlier, I moved the rear belly weights closer to the hook hole, helped the swim. But that was on the body shape I'm using.

Keep on testing.....

Thanks Ed. Best swimmer of the above four is the one bottom right which lines up with your suggestion, rear two belly weights fairly close to midpoint of plug. What do u think? 

 

With larger gliders I've done they sink slowly enough that I go by how they sit in bucket--tail vs. nose level. But these sink so fast I have to go by which direction they sink--toward nose side or toward tail side or just straight down. I need to go back and bucket test the finished gliders and note how they sink and compare with swim. Should probably start noting that during the building process also.

 

Edited by TopStriperAngler

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I still float every glider after rigging, while I'm adding the weights, to get the sink rate and attitude I want. Slightly tail down, slow sink for the beach, fast sink for places with current.

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27 mins ago, Ed White said:

I still float every glider after rigging, while I'm adding the weights, to get the sink rate and attitude I want. Slightly tail down, slow sink for the beach, fast sink for places with current.

It seems to be one of those things you just have to do with these plugs. How do you attach weights? I been using a glue gun recently I like it a lot messy tho. 

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38 mins ago, TopStriperAngler said:

It seems to be one of those things you just have to do with these plugs. How do you attach weights? I been using a glue gun recently I like it a lot messy tho. 

I usually just use some tape wrapped around the weight and the plug. Fine for test float in a 5 gallon bucket. I find the bucket works better for me than the sink due to the bucket being deeper. A little more room for it to sink while I watch. 

1 hour ago, Ed White said:

I still float every glider after rigging, while I'm adding the weights, to get the sink rate and attitude I want. Slightly tail down, slow sink for the beach, fast sink for places with current.

Same here. I also attach a snap similar to what I intend to use on the nose of the plug during the test float. 

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Posted (edited)

Shoot I have to remember to attach a snap next time especially on these micros. I started doing the 5 gallon bucket I like it for same reason. One thing I been doing is drilling weight holes, inserting weight, and then securing with a little bit of pastiline clay. The clay will keep the weight in there even when out casting. This is the stuff I use for making molds. 

 

One thing I found, sort of funny, was the weights added to the exterior of plug during testing increase volume by a lot. Once that weight ends up inside the plug, and your volume drops back to the volume of just the plug body, you can be well past floating or neutral buoyancy. Not a problem unless you are aiming for neutral really. Doesn't affect the balance stuff which is so important of course.    

 

I been drilling the front belly weight holes first and inserting weight. Then I glue the rear ones on until I get the right sink. Just realizing that by drilling those front belly holes I have been throwing things off. 

Edited by TopStriperAngler

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