flyrad10

Type of walls for finished basement

Rate this topic

22 posts in this topic

What is currently the  best state of the art wall material for finished basements beside good ole fashion sheet rock. Is there anything the non-expert diy sheet rocker could handle as an alternative?  The basement is damp during hot humid summer periods but there is no flooding or pooling of water, although there is some efflorescence.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, flyrad10 said:

What is currently the  best state of the art wall material for finished basements beside good ole fashion sheet rock. Is there anything the non-expert diy sheet rocker could handle as an alternative?  The basement is damp during hot humid summer periods but there is no flooding or pooling of water, although there is some efflorescence.

Finished my basement in green board and metal studs; after having to rip out everything from a 1960’s /70’s paneled finish. Had all the walls and ceiling sprayfoamed. I wouldn’t do the ceiling again as it was is PIA to install hats and dig out some wiring. But I have to say it is the perfect temperature area of the house summer and winter, with the only heat being the furnace.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It is either drywall wood studs or metal studs. Paneling like they used to do back some time ago is out the window. I think you should try to mitigate the humidity issue. What type of heating system are you using, if it is forced air. Honeywell has dehumidifiers you can have tied into the system.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Metal studs, drywall to within 5 inches of the floor. Cover the gap with wide baseboard. If you do get water in the basement you will only lose the baseboard and can allow to dry out.

 

also. Stand the walls 4 inches away from the cement walls. No contact against the basement walls. NO INSULATION ANYWHERE.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited) · Report post

13 hours ago, poopdeck said:

Metal studs, drywall to within 5 inches of the floor. Cover the gap with wide baseboard. If you do get water in the basement you will only lose the baseboard and can allow to dry out.

 

also. Stand the walls 4 inches away from the cement walls. No contact against the basement walls. NO INSULATION ANYWHERE.

I am no expert ( not even close) and I do understand the concern that poorly done insulation can cause problems.  That said, there are ways to insulate a basement correctly.  If the basement is finished and heated I think you need to consider that hot air might cause condensation on uninsulated part of basement walls.  Maybe more so on the parts that aren't buried- eg a walkout basement and the part of the foundation above grade but below the rim joist.   Condensation can lead to mold.

 

If there's a moisture issue and efflorescence, I'd solve that first  Maybe it regrading or movign a downspout, maybe it's coating the wall with a sealer of sort sort ( eg Dry lock), maybe it's HVAC/ dehumidifiers.

 

I think it's Dow Corning that has some sort of non-drywall basement system.  I looked at it ~ 10 years ago and it was pricey. My basement was dry and the walls already blanketed with insulation, so I went with traditional 2x4 and drywall.  Additional insulation  where the blanket didn't meet the floor and near the rim joist were required to meet my local code.

Edited by rathrbefishn

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, poopdeck said:

Metal studs, drywall to within 5 inches of the floor. Cover the gap with wide baseboard. If you do get water in the basement you will only lose the baseboard and can allow to dry out.

 

also. Stand the walls 4 inches away from the cement walls. No contact against the basement walls. NO INSULATION ANYWHERE.

No insulation anywhere. Man that is some dumb advice. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Fix your moisture problem first then follow this. 
1” rigid insulation board on the cement walls. Glued in place with foam board glue. 
studded walls with a pressure treated plate. I usually use 2x4 premium Burrell studs from Home Depot. They are a upgrade from there regular studs. Right about now they are about 8$ each up in NH. 

R-15 high density unfaced insulation in the stud bays. The rigid insulation gives you a thermal break in the living area your doing. Between that an the high density you’ll achieve a r-20 in your outside walls. 
Sheetrock I use purple board. Mold can’t grow on the purple board it can grow on the green board, big difference. 
I always do a 2x2 flat lay in tile for my drop ceiling. 
I hope this helps you out. I’ve done probably twenty basements like this and the inspectors like it. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks everyone, Gray what is “2x2 flat lay in tile for my drop ceiling”. Deck, why no insulation? My sheet rock walls now are set  About 18 inches from concrete foundation with 2x4 studs and 6” fiberglass battens between. There is no mold issue but it’s damp in summer and cold in winter and need a dedicated  dehumidifier or heat pump to handle radical temperature and humidity seasonal changes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, flyrad10 said:

Thanks everyone, Gray what is “2x2 flat lay in tile for my drop ceiling”. Deck, why no insulation? My sheet rock walls now are set  About 18 inches from concrete foundation with 2x4 studs and 6” fiberglass battens between. There is no mold issue but it’s damp in summer and cold in winter and need a dedicated  dehumidifier or heat pump to handle radical temperature and humidity seasonal changes.

Drop ceiling tiles, 24”x24” 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/18/2022 at 10:20 PM, gray gables said:

No insulation anywhere. Man that is some dumb advice. 

Is name calling the best you can come up with? You must be a contractor. It’s a basement. Most likely it’s a damp environment. If you want a place for mice and mold to live free, and a place to trap moisture go ahead and insulate away. 90% of basements have or will have water intrusion. Every finished basement I’ve ever been in smells musty. Ever wonder why? Go into a finished basement with no insulation and take a whiff. To the truly dumb, I’m not saying all basements are such just the ones I have been in. If you are fortunate, such as I, to have a dry basement please remember it’s a basement where water intrusion may always occur through ground water and leaky pipes. In a perfect world I would say to insulate everywhere. It’s not perfect and I would not insulate in environments where dampness and a lack of ventilation is present. Call this advise whatever you like, I’ll take a little coldness over that musty smell. You are free to pick the musty odor if you like. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, poopdeck said:

Is name calling the best you can come up with? You must be a contractor. It’s a basement. Most likely it’s a damp environment. If you want a place for mice and mold to live free, and a place to trap moisture go ahead and insulate away. 90% of basements have or will have water intrusion. Every finished basement I’ve ever been in smells musty. Ever wonder why? Go into a finished basement with no insulation and take a whiff. To the truly dumb, I’m not saying all basements are such just the ones I have been in. If you are fortunate, such as I, to have a dry basement please remember it’s a basement where water intrusion may always occur through ground water and leaky pipes. In a perfect world I would say to insulate everywhere. It’s not perfect and I would not insulate in environments where dampness and a lack of ventilation is present. Call this advise whatever you like, I’ll take a little coldness over that musty smell. You are free to pick the musty odor if you like. 

No name calling...

1- Take care of water intrusion issues, top priority.

2- Plan for a means of de-humidification and get a condensate pump and line to the outside.

3- Thermal break on the interior surface of the concrete walls - glued rigid foam board to surface of walls, tape joints.

4- Internal walls, ideally metal studs, or treated sills, wood stud etc. set in from the thermal break. Make sure you meet local fire codes.

5- Mold resistant drywall.

 

I think Gray gives sound advice, especially using 2x2 drop ceiling tiles. You can do plan to fancy, and you'll always want access to the ceiling joists for wiring and plumbing without having to tear out a ceiling. Not a cheap project, but the right way to do a basement. If you take care of the water intrusion and humidity issues, provide a thermal break on the wall, you will minimize or eliminate mold issues and the musky smell. Plus the temperature will be pretty stable year round unless you have air leaks, another issue you need to address with water intrusion.

 

And no, I am not a Contractor, but like to think a I'm a fairly decent DIY'er.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, poopdeck said:

Is name calling the best you can come up with? You must be a contractor. It’s a basement. Most likely it’s a damp environment. If you want a place for mice and mold to live free, and a place to trap moisture go ahead and insulate away. 90% of basements have or will have water intrusion. Every finished basement I’ve ever been in smells musty. Ever wonder why? Go into a finished basement with no insulation and take a whiff. To the truly dumb, I’m not saying all basements are such just the ones I have been in. If you are fortunate, such as I, to have a dry basement please remember it’s a basement where water intrusion may always occur through ground water and leaky pipes. In a perfect world I would say to insulate everywhere. It’s not perfect and I would not insulate in environments where dampness and a lack of ventilation is present. Call this advise whatever you like, I’ll take a little coldness over that musty smell. You are free to pick the musty odor if you like. 

Yes I am a contractor. Been doing this type of work since 1992. Plus my way meets code, yours doesn’t. So that pretty much sums it up. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/17/2022 at 2:25 PM, flyrad10 said:

What is currently the  best state of the art wall material for finished basements beside good ole fashion sheet rock. Is there anything the non-expert diy sheet rocker could handle as an alternative?  The basement is damp during hot humid summer periods but there is no flooding or pooling of water, although there is some efflorescence.

Look up 

The Better Basement company.  Out of Neshanic.

 

They specialize in the breathable fiberglass fabric wall panels.

I think they were his make made to his specification if I recall

 

Great for damp basements

spectacular for acoustics.

 

Look phenominal.

 

If I recall, one sales reps is a member here.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 mins ago, scoobydoo said:

Look up 

The Better Basement company.  Out of Neshanic.

 

They specialize in the breathable fiberglass fabric wall panels.

I think they were his make made to his specification if I recall

 

Great for damp basements

spectacular for acoustics.

 

Look phenominal.

 

If I recall, one sales reps is a member here.

 

 

How do you rough in the electrical in those panels?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, scoobydoo said:

Look up 

The Better Basement company.  Out of Neshanic.

 

They specialize in the breathable fiberglass fabric wall panels.

I think they were his make made to his specification if I recall

 

Great for damp basements

spectacular for acoustics.

 

Look phenominal.

 

If I recall, one sales reps is a member here.

 

 

There basements are stupid expensive also. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to register here in order to participate.

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.