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Shipwreck

Wind Farms in NY Bight

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https://thefishingwire.com/interior-department-announces-historic-wind-energy-auction/

 

JANUARY 12, 2022

Secretary of the Interior Deb Haaland announced today [January 12, 2022] that the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) will hold a wind auction next month for more than 480,000 acres offshore New York and New Jersey, in the area known as the New York Bight. Secretary Haaland was joined by New Jersey Governor Phil Murphy, New York Governor Kathy Hochul, and Liz Shuler, President of the American Federation of Labor and Congress of Industrial Organizations, to highlight what will be the first offshore wind lease sale under the Biden-Harris administration.

The Feb. 23 auction will allow offshore wind developers to bid on six lease areas – the most areas ever offered in a single auction – as described in BOEM’s Final Sale Notice. Leases offered in this sale could result in 5.6 to 7 gigawatts of offshore wind energy, enough to power nearly 2 million homes. As offshore wind technology continues to advance, these areas may have the potential to produce even more clean energy.

“The Biden-Harris administration has made tackling the climate crisis a centerpiece of our agenda, and offshore wind opportunities like the New York Bight present a once-in-a-generation opportunity to fight climate change and create good-paying, union jobs in the United States,” said Secretary of the Interior Deb Haaland. “We are at an inflection point for domestic offshore wind energy development. We must seize this moment – and we must do it together.”

On today’s call, the leaders outlined a shared vision for developing a robust offshore wind domestic supply chain that will deliver benefits to residents of New York and New Jersey and the surrounding region, including underserved communities. This collaboration will serve as a model for future engagement and establish the U.S. as a major player in the global offshore wind market.

The Biden-Harris administration’s goal to install 30 GW of offshore wind by 2030 is complemented by state offshore wind policies and actions throughout the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic. Collectively, New York and New Jersey have set the nation’s largest regional offshore wind target of installing over 16 GW of offshore wind by 2035.

“Offshore wind holds the tremendous promise for our future in terms of climate change, economic growth, strengthening our work force, and job creation,” said Governor Murphy. “New Jersey is already committed to creating nearly one-quarter of the nation’s offshore wind-generation market and these transformative projects are proof that climate action can drive investments in infrastructure and manufacturing, while creating good-paying, union jobs. By acting on this this shared vision, we can promote our joint offshore wind goals, and deliver benefits to residents of both states, particularly those in overburdened communities. Together, with this critical cooperation with the Biden-Harris administration and our state partners, we will turn this vision of becoming a leader in the global offshore wind market into a reality.”

“Here in New York, we are already living with the effects of climate change through extreme weather that pose a direct threat to our way of life,” Governor Hochul said. “We must chart an ambitious path toward a cleaner energy economy now more than ever, and today’s milestone further highlights New York’s commitment to reaching it’s offshore wind goals. This effort will require collaboration at all levels, and I applaud the Biden Administration for their action and thank Secretary Haaland and BOEM, as well as New Jersey Governor Murphy, for their partnership as we build on New York’s offshore wind energy development.”

A recent report indicates that the United States’ growing offshore wind industry presents a $109 billion opportunity in revenue to businesses in the supply chain over the next decade.

The New York Bight offshore wind auction will include several innovative lease stipulations designed to promote the development of a robust domestic U.S. supply chain for offshore wind and enhance engagement with Tribes, the commercial fishing industry, other ocean users, and underserved communities. The stipulations will also advance flexibility in transmission planning and make use of project labor agreements throughout the construction of offshore wind projects. Stipulations include incentives to source major components domestically – such as blades, turbines, and foundations – and to enter into project labor agreements to ensure projects are union-built.

To advance the Department’s environmental justice and economic empowerment goals, the Sale Notice also requires lessees to identify Tribes, underserved communities and other ocean users who could be affected by offshore wind development. The Interior Department will hold companies accountable for improving their engagement, communication and transparency with these communities.

These additions are intended to promote offshore wind development in a way that coexists with other ocean uses and protects the ocean environment, while also facilitating our nation’s energy future for generations to come.

BOEM initially asked for information and nominations of commercial interest for 1,735,154 acres in the Bight. Based on the bureau’s review of scientific data, and extensive input from the commercial fishing industry, Tribes, partnering agencies, key stakeholders, and the public, BOEM reduced the acreage by 72% to avoid conflicts with ocean users and minimize environmental impacts. BOEM will continue to engage with stakeholders as the process unfolds.

More information about the auction, lease stipulations, list of qualified bidders for the auction and Interior’s collaboration with New York and New Jersey can be found on BOEM’s website.

Background

The Biden-Harris administration catalyzed the offshore wind industry by announcing the first-ever national offshore wind energy goal, creating a clear vision for the future of this innovative industry. This goal is reinforced by the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, which will make robust investments in sustainable economies, clean energy, and climate resilience.

The Administration has already made significant progress toward creating a pipeline of projects. It has approved the nation’s first two commercial-scale offshore wind projects in federal waters: the 800-megawatt Vineyard Wind project (approved on May 11, 2021) and the 130-megawatt South Fork Wind project (approved on November 24, 2021). BOEM expects to review at least 16 plans to construct and operate commercial offshore wind energy facilities by 2025, which would represent more than 22 GW of clean energy for the nation.

In addition, this past fall Secretary Haaland announced a new leasing path forward, which identified up to seven potential lease sales by 2025, including the New York Bight and offshore the Carolinas and California later this year, to be followed by lease sales for the Central Atlantic, Gulf of Maine, the Gulf of Mexico, and offshore Oregon.

Edited by Shipwreck

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BAD. Lived thru the FIRST ONE. Block wind farm is the biggest joke in the world. Incompetent fools. The money thrown at this is astronomical. They are unreliable and have a self life of 10 years. Block had a line installed from the mainland for power. They spent years installing it. It lasted 1 year and the cable became exposed on the towns public beach. They then spent another year trying to fix it. More money washed away, millions upon millions. In another 6 years they will need to be Replaced. Until the line is functional the wind mills spin for no gain. The whole island has to rebuild all its infrastructure. The voltage had to be increased from 2350 to 4160 volts and everything has to be changed out on the entire island. This is a Liberal monument for the deep blue northeast and it’s a rotten shame. They have ruined most costal environments and are now after OURS. Fight this nasty junk heap. Just my two cents !

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UNION involvement guarantees an overpriced project , less productivity from labor and kickbacks for the Democrat Party. As stated above , there is a shelf life for the windmills and transmission cables , rarely mentioned are the impacts of the land based infrastructure and cable landing areas. It’s an environmental sht show. Look at what’s happening in Wainscot, and multiply by 10. 

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Posted (edited) · Report post

We should run some more Canadian Pipe lines through the middle of our country!

 

No experience with the offshore wind farms, could imagine that being a disaster to install.  We have them in western MD since 2010 and it has been a success. 

Edited by animalbarrie

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Posted (edited) · Report post

Those wind generators have a finite life just like solar panels.  The blades deteriorate and become inefficient after 10 or 15 years of use.  So far there's no good way to recycle them.  That means the only way to dispose of them is to dig big holes in the ground and bury them.  How much good does that do for the environment?

I'd like to see someone do an audit and determine the real total cost of building them and compare it to the money made from the energy they generate.  By real cost I mean everything involved.  The cost of the steel and cement for the foundation, the total cost to build and install the tower, the generator, the blades, the distribution cables, everything.  All that without government subsidies.  I wouldn't be surprised to learn that they are a losing proposition.

Edited by Dan Tinman

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This is a new technology and it has growing pains. I am "pro," so long as all the costs are well - detailed and the limitations are not concealed.

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 A good quality, modern wind turbine will generally last for 20 years, although this can be extended to 25 years or longer depending on environmental factors and the correct maintenance procedures being followed. However, the maintenance costs will increase as the structure ages.

Wind turbines are unlikely to last much longer than this because of the extreme loads they are subjected to throughout their lives. This is partly due to the structure of the turbines themselves, since the turbine blades and the tower are only fixed at one end of the structure and therefore face the full force of the wind. Of course, as the wind speed increases, so do the loads that turbines are subjected to. This can reach levels almost 100 times greater than the design loads at rated wind speed, which is why many turbines are designed to shut down to protect themselves at higher wind speeds.

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Posted (edited) · Report post

6 hours ago, Dan Tinman said:

Those wind generators have a finite life just like solar panels.  The blades deteriorate and become inefficient after 10 or 15 years of use.  So far there's no good way to recycle the.  That means the only way to dispose of them is to dig big holes in the ground and bury them.  How much good does that do for the environment?

I'd like to see someone do an audit and determine the real total cost of building them and compare it to the money made from the energy they generate.  By real cost I mean everything involved.  The cost of the steel and cement for the foundation, the total cost to build and install the tower, the generator, the blades, the distribution cables, everything.  All that without government subsidies.  I wouldn't be surprised to learn that they are a losing proposition.

They're primarily made of steel so why wouldn't we be able to recycle steel?

Edited by PaulS

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37 mins ago, PaulS said:

They're primarily made of steel so why wouldn't we be able to recycle steel?

The blades are fiberglas.  The leading edges become frayed and eroded from dust particles.  They then lose aerodynamic efficiency and must be replaced.

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Posted (edited) · Report post

I think the blades are a composite using fibreglass, kevlar and carbon fiber, and likely some alloy of some sort, which is why they are difficult to recycle. For that matter, I dont they have as yet figured out how to recycle the thousands of acres of solar cells that are installed....I guess this will give third world countries a future revenue source. 

Edited by riggler

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2 hours ago, BrianBM said:

This is a new technology and it has growing pains. I am "pro," so long as all the costs are well - detailed and the limitations are not concealed.

Welcome to .....

welcome.jpeg

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On 1/13/2022 at 11:03 AM, pakalolo said:

UNION involvement guarantees an overpriced project , less productivity from labor and kickbacks for the Democrat Party.

Pak, as a union member I work pretty hard for my wages. Your generalization is out of touch in my experience.

You are right about the kickback to Biden though.

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