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I'm sick of going to the same spots and getting skunked over and over.  At what point do you say this isnt fun anymore I'm just wasting time and money with nothing to show for it except a fish or two you cant even keep.  And Ive noticed more often than not the crowd of people along the water with me arent finding fish either.       

      

I'm going to try surf casting this season and experiment at new areas along the coast instead of digging through forums for a popular place to fish only to go there and be disappointed.  But Im not sure what I should be looking for, what are promising signs of fish.   lIf im going to explore I want to at least do it methodically based on logic instead of just hoping this is a lucky spot.    

     

Obviously theres increased activity at dawn and dusk.  Is the middle of the night a time of inactivity like middle of the day typically is?    

     

Then you have the tides that play a role.  From what Ive gathered the moving tide creates underwater movement and turbulance that releases food and nutrients for baitfish and/or disorients them.  Our target fish then move in on these vulnerable bait fish.  Ive read the sweet spot is 2 hours before or after high and low tides is that right?

   

 Why would you want to start fishing 2 hours before high tide?  i can see 2 hours after high tide, the water starts picking up speed and carrying baitfish from their inland waterways toward the open ocean, forcing them through chokepoints along the way that Target fish exploit.  But 2 hours before high tide, the water is moving lazily inland I dont understand why that would be beneficial for action.  And im not sure why there is an advantage of fishing around low tide.         

     

What other environment features can you read like you can a chokepoint?  In a cove for example are you more likely to find fish at the entrance or deep inside? in shade or in shadow ?    are they attracted to current eddies or calmer water?    

     

I know fish like structure would it be useful to study underwater topography charts  where can i access detailed charts on a specific area?    

       

 

Edited by cadbao

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there is no magick to fishing.all what you need is put time in.catch fish is right time right place.i am dumb fisherman i put time in and i get my share off fish.

if you like to catch fish first you have to find them.some time i am looking for fish and some time i let fish find me,i will not move.

it do not meather on any prediction.

what ever spieces you fish for the # is 100% and the nobber is devided to

example

negative fish 30%

neutral fish 30%

positive fish 40%

that euqual 100%

this nobers are changing every minutes,more positive fish ,beter bite.

i went tuesday got my limit from 5 pm to midnight in one spot

i went saturday same time not even bump and i cover 1 mile.

 

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Posted (edited) · Report post

I mean to me it’s learning your target species and their preferred “habitat” if you will,  and then moving forward with that information, I know we can’t see underwater , but the water motion and direction and jetty’s will give you a good idea of what’s below from the shore. Any Jetty’s are always a good place to start for pretty much everything. Inlets have been known to produce as well. 

Edited by SurfCasterNJ

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Find a good Tide Chart of your area and someone to explain plus and minus tides along with moon phases. Now start visiting spots and inspecting them during minus lows around the New and Full Moons. Shouldn't take you long to find some productive bottom. The February moons are traditionally the strongest and a good time to search around.

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The answers to all your questions are out there in the surf. Stop over thinking it and start walking. The best information you will receive is from those who fish your area. You will meet them on your walk. Always anticipate there being a bite, but never expect it. Catching is just the bonus of fishing. Good luck!!

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Walk walk and walk some more. Remember tides and currents are two different things.

Keep a log. Note everything wind, moon, barometric pressure, water temp air temp.

Snorkel potential spots in summer. Find hidden rocks, and mussel beds.

Do current tests, drop a float in water see where it goes. Refrence that to the hidden structures you have located. 

Watch youtube videos. My favorites are crazy alberto and billy the greek plus anything from zeno.

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Time on the water and exploring is what will find fish because you become more intimate with your local water. Videos and reading can point you in the right direction but local knowledge is best. Your spots might be right for a different time of day or time of year. 

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Posted (edited) · Report post

If you are bait fishing, don't overthink. Just look for a deep hole or rip current in the area you going. Have 3 rods, cast out 40m, 60m and 80m. Which ever distance get you the first fish then keep cast to that distance for more catch. As for bait, I still stick with mussel, mullet or squid (whichever I can find them FRESH, NOT FORZEN BAIT).

 

As for tide, I always find productive 2 hours before max high tide, then everything will quiet down for 1-2 hours. That the time you walk the beach to find some LIVE BAITS (Sand Flea, Sand Worm and Crab). Then I will start fishing again on the start of run out low tide for 3-4 hours.

 

MOST important thing, bring a buddy and beers so you won't feel bored.

 

Just relax and enjoy your day, tight line buddy.

Edited by Pierce

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Posted (edited) · Report post

I started to doing some research into neighboring areas and beaches to my current spot. Started talk to a few other fisherman that have been very helpful with some intel. Doing some google map research to find parking areas and 4 wheel access. Now it’s time to get out and get boots on the ground recon at low tides. A few weeks ago I started a post about scouting new spots. Got some good info: scout for access and parking, scout a extreme low tides - new moon, full moon, take pictures of areas and compile notes. Also going to start a fishing log this season. As a Bowhunter I would start scouting right at the end of the previous season. 
 

Edited by PeteA

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Drive the shore line.  If you see people fishing stop and watch what they are doing.  A lot of times you can learn a ton just by sitting back and observing what those around you are doing.  Pay attention to what they are throwing, how fast or slow the retrieve is.  Do they add a twitch to the retrieve.  Even if they are catching and you are not doesn't mean your outing is a failure.  You can take what you observed and come back and try to imitate it.   

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12 hours ago, fishless said:

Drive the shore line.  If you see people fishing stop and watch what they are doing.  A lot of times you can learn a ton just by sitting back and observing what those around you are doing.  Pay attention to what they are throwing, how fast or slow the retrieve is.  Do they add a twitch to the retrieve.  Even if they are catching and you are not doesn't mean your outing is a failure.  You can take what you observed and come back and try to imitate it.   

Quite a few great suggestions here but what  @fishless and @PeteA are suggesting will definitely be of great value.

One thing I learned many years ago when I first started surfcasting is to never spend hours in the same spot.

Get familiar with the areas you plan to fish and visit during various tides, low tide will give you an idea of structure. If there's fishermen out, pay attention to what they're doing, throwing, retrieve, etc. (disregard the bino fishermen.... :D).

 

I would also suggest keeping a log of your outings (whether you catch or not). Over time this will be a valuable resource.

 

Tight lines!

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On 1/9/2022 at 9:31 PM, cadbao said:

 

Obviously theres increased activity at dawn and dusk.  Is the middle of the night a time of inactivity like middle of the day typically is?    

 

I have not found the middle of the day or the middle of the night to be a time of inactivity 

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If you have time to fish, do it. You won’t always have time so do it when you can. (I don’t know if you’re a young guy but to those that are in their teens, 20s, early 30s, etc.: FYI - the life we control when we’re young will often control us for a few decades.)

 

Keep a log that notes the time, the tide, and the wind speed & direction. 
 

Change up the time, the tide, the wind and the weather if you wanna see something new but mostly put time in and keep notes of your experience & your conversations with reliable sources. 
 

Try different spots & types of spots but also have a “go to” favorite that you know well and can hit up when it’s snotty or really high water or whatever and still be safe because you know it that well. 
 

When the weather stinks, read your log & reflect. Use Google maps  and rotate/sharpen your hooks. 

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