young

Fly rod setup for kayak?

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2021 was frustrating to say the least with Albie fishing from the kayak for me. 
 

had a day with many chance but they were on rain bait that were less then 1 inch. There were about 6 boats that day and only the guy with the fly rod setup hooked up. 
 

so thinking for a while to get a fly setup for the kayak. 
 

what fly rod setup do you use on your kayak? 9’ 9wt? 8’ or 7’ or even shorter???
 

Please share your experience.  
 

by the way, I have zero experience with fly rod. 

 

Edited by young

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Fly casting sufficiently in the salt isn't easy. Enjoy the journey! A fly cast is a smooth rapid acceleration to an abrupt stop, once you start you'll get it. Youtube videos are your friend. 

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I have an 8 foot fly rod for the salt. It comes in 4 pieces. I use it mainly for blue fish. It is hard to cast

sitting down. Also need a  clear deck so you don't get caught up on stuff. Also hard to land a fish with an 8 foot rod in the kayak. It is an 8 weight fly rod.  You can catch blue fish trolling with your fly rod.

It is a little bit tricky to attach to a rod holder.  Some people find their pedal drive gets in the way when

fly fishing. I can not comment on that I have a paddle :)

 

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14 mins ago, dbjpb said:

I have an 8 foot fly rod for the salt. It comes in 4 pieces. I use it mainly for blue fish. It is hard to cast

sitting down. Also need a  clear deck so you don't get caught up on stuff. Also hard to land a fish with an 8 foot rod in the kayak. It is an 8 weight fly rod.  You can catch blue fish trolling with your fly rod.

It is a little bit tricky to attach to a rod holder.  Some people find their pedal drive gets in the way when

fly fishing. I can not comment on that I have a paddle :)

 

Have you tried using shorter fly rod on the kayak. I find 8’ rod is too long for the kayak. 
 

what kind of fly line do you use? Sinking or floating? 
 

How about stripping line on the side of the boat and let the line float with the current instead of on the deck? I have an outback 2020 pedal drive. 

Edited by young

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I could not find one.  I think a shorter fly rod for the kayak would be great. 7 footer would work well.

Was going to try using the paddle board this year but the blues were not around like in years past.

 

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This make me think of  building a custom 7’  1 piece fly rod. Make the butt end long enough to put in a rod holder on the yak. 
 

anyone done that?

Edited by young

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Since you're already closer to the water sitting in a kayak, I would guess the shorter rod length would make it harder to keep your line above the water on the back cast. Personally, I don't have any problem casting with a 9 foot rod in the kayak - other than my shoulder hurts way more at the end of a long day casting sitting down as opposed to standing up. 

 

If this is your first fly rod, I would go with a 9 wt. In my opinion it's the best all around for albies, stripers and bluefish - you won't be over powered or under gunned.

 

I really like the fly rod holder that Folbe makes. (google - Folbe Fly Rod Holder)  I have the one made by Scotty but the one by Folbe is a lot better IMO. The one problem was, Folbe didn't make a base for a track mount. I wound up buying a Scotty rod holder post. (google - 412 Scotty Replacement Rod Holder Post) The teeth on the Scotty post align perfectly with the teeth on the Folbe rod holder.

 

 

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Kayak + 8# + 37” Blues = Better than sex!    
 

 ….    Same setup but with Albies is still on the bucket list … one day the planets will align

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1 hour ago, young said:

This make me think of  building a custom 7’  1 piece fly rod. Make the butt end long enough to put in a rod holder on the yak. 
 

anyone done that?

A 6’ broomstick with sinking line would probably work in a stiff breeze … eyes are watering just thinking of the tennis elbow agony the next day would bring

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1 hour ago, young said:

Have you tried using shorter fly rod on the kayak. I find 8’ rod is too long for the kayak. 
 

what kind of fly line do you use? Sinking or floating? 
 

How about stripping line on the side of the boat and let the line float with the current instead of on the deck? I have an outback 2020 pedal drive. 

 

Any fly rod is a giant pain in the ass on a kayak, especially of you are sitting down.  The fly line will cause you more of a hassle than the length of the rod.  It certainly can be done but no an ideal situation to learn.

 

9ft 9wt with an integrated shorting head intermediate line like a Rio outbound short (int 9wt) is the standard alibi, bluefish, striper rig.  This has been covered exhaustively on the fly rod forum.  If you think an 8ft rod would be more ergonomic on the kayak, go for it, it won't hurt/help your casting.  You should consider some sort of basket to hold the fly line as your casting, it should not drag in the water.

 

Consider making friends with somebody who owns a boat.

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Before you even begin to think of the kayak fly rod combo being zero expensive to start with Id take a few lessons. From there sit back and watch a lot of videos showing techniques. Don’t just watch but really watch, pay attention, really pay attention to movement. 
 

Practice while standing and quarter yourself so you can watch that backcast. place paper plates at different lengths, cast and try to hit those spots. 
 

next sit down and try casting, mimicking the kayak position. Your back cast will hit the water unless you do a climbing backcast. This cast will bring that line up and back above the water line. 
 

When I lived in Nj I’d use a shorter rod and in 9weight. It’s more than enough rod to control a fish and not too heavy for a fluke. 
 

don’t bother with floating lines, use an intermediate first. This gets you below the wave action. 
 

dont bring any bluefish in your kayak if it’s large. Control fish at kayak side while you unhook. Use a grip, or I’ve used a small gaff to lip gaff. You’ll get don’t use a gaff from some, I don’t care it helped me have complete control of any fish. 

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13 mins ago, saltfisherman said:

Before you even begin to think of the kayak fly rod combo being zero expensive to start with Id take a few lessons. From there sit back and watch a lot of videos showing techniques. Don’t just watch but really watch, pay attention, really pay attention to movement. 
 

Practice while standing and quarter yourself so you can watch that backcast. place paper plates at different lengths, cast and try to hit those spots. 
 

next sit down and try casting, mimicking the kayak position. Your back cast will hit the water unless you do a climbing backcast. This cast will bring that line up and back above the water line. 
 

When I lived in Nj I’d use a shorter rod and in 9weight. It’s more than enough rod to control a fish and not too heavy for a fluke. 
 

don’t bother with floating lines, use an intermediate first. This gets you below the wave action. 
 

dont bring any bluefish in your kayak if it’s large. Control fish at kayak side while you unhook. Use a grip, or I’ve used a small gaff to lip gaff. You’ll get don’t use a gaff from some, I don’t care it helped me have complete control of any fish. 

I will watch some videos then borrow my friends setup and practice. 
 

I understand what you are saying. I am proficient with a spin setup. At times in the kayak, you need to be precise when there are many things at play. Control the rudder, casting, closing bail, jigging and feeling the jig. 
 

add fly setup and it’s complete different animal. 

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Fly line control can be a big hassle. You want to keep things that the line will tangle around to a minimum. After trying a few options, I have settled with a setup that has stripping basket hanging off the side. It's been working well. I mainly fish in lakes and rivers so I'm not sure how it would work in rough surf - paddling could be an issue too. Anyway, I made a post of it here -

  Short video of the basket while catching a small striper

 

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17 mins ago, young said:

I will watch some videos then borrow my friends setup and practice. 
 

I understand what you are saying. I am proficient with a spin setup. At times in the kayak, you need to be precise when there are many things at play. Control the rudder, casting, closing bail, jigging and feeling the jig. 
 

add fly setup and it’s complete different animal. 

Getting to a point that basic items become instinctive is the hardest part to learn. The control of line, the line where it all is on your stripping and clearing of it while controlling the line at the reel at the take become learned reflex.
 

The moment a fish grabs your fly the fun only just starts. He playing of the fish is something you will earn when it comes to the strength of the line, the angle of the rod related to the fish. Too high an angle gives the fish all the advantages. 
 

a quick lesson for you. Pick up that fly rod and have someone pull on the line as if it’s a fish. Have the rod straight up and down, look at the rod and where it bends. Now, take the rod and rotate it to the side never giving up the amount of “fish” pull. Look at the rod and how it bends. The taller the rod is held the less bend in that rod, bring that same tension and now the rod is horizontal, the rod bends deeper into the butt. The deeper a rod bends into its blank the more pressure you apply. 
 

next, don’t get that reel above your stomach when fighting. Yes you will have to a time but at the same time relieve pressure at that point, bring that rod down then put the pressure back on. High sticking a rod will get that thing snapped that quick. Be very aware of this when you are close lined to the kayak, keep that reel at your waist. 
 

 

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