RAW

Never thought I would say this!

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Last 2 days, 1 fish hooked, 2 hits and nothing for me and 6 diehard snook and redfish guys. All zipped, nothing tried worked. Cold temps and no bait fish, 100’s of both species just lolling around all day. 5’ of gin clear water, even changed equipment to use 20lb flouro . And zippo . Mullet, pinfish,shrimp, ladyfish and lizard fish. Feeling mortal, even wore different shirts:sarc::rav:

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Happens. It's maddening when you can see the fish and they want nothing you offer. Maybe try some striper plugs. I'd walk the dog with a spook. Different sizes and colors until you find one that works. I'll be in Florida in March, I really want to try to hook a snook as its one of the fish I haven't caught yet. 

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5 hours ago, RAW said:

Last 2 days, 1 fish hooked, 2 hits and nothing for me and 6 diehard snook and redfish guys. All zipped, nothing tried worked. Cold temps and no bait fish, 100’s of both species just lolling around all day. 5’ of gin clear water, even changed equipment to use 20lb flouro . And zippo . Mullet, pinfish,shrimp, ladyfish and lizard fish. Feeling mortal, even wore different shirts:sarc::rav:

Well, you had a great run!!!

 

We’ve only been in FL since October 2020 but I don’t recall it being nearly as cold last fall as it has been this year. My wife (who loves the heat) has been complaining like all get out lol! And the temps are not showing any signs of improvement either.

I have read of these snook just getting lockjaw as the temps drop, I guess that’s what you’re experiencing now.

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Snook are notoriously sensitive to cold temperatures. There were a few hard cold snaps down here in S. Florida that almost took out the entire population. Was like Armageddon. Water temps below 60 degrees can put a complete halt to all feeding activity and all activity in general. Death can occur at 54 degrees. So anything tossed at them, they nose it up. Same thing with largemouth bass, they can completely shut down when water temps reach those frigid thresholds. Best advice is to slow it down to a craw, look for moving water, moving water creates friction, and fraction creates heat, and although slight it can make a big difference. Look for tidal creaks or spillways, shallow water areas.....I've caught some decent snook during our cold spells with those kinda tactical changes. 
 
 
 
 
 

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10 hours ago, zcoker said:
Snook are notoriously sensitive to cold temperatures. There were a few hard cold snaps down here in S. Florida that almost took out the entire population. Was like Armageddon. Water temps below 60 degrees can put a complete halt to all feeding activity and all activity in general. Death can occur at 54 degrees. So anything tossed at them, they nose it up. Same thing with largemouth bass, they can completely shut down when water temps reach those frigid thresholds. Best advice is to slow it down to a craw, look for moving water, moving water creates friction, and fraction creates heat, and although slight it can make a big difference. Look for tidal creaks or spillways, shallow water areas.....I've caught some decent snook during our cold spells with those kinda tactical changes. 
 
 
 
 
 

Thanks Z. Would you say in addition to these good tips would “cold” snook also be more receptive to very small offerings, or does the retrieve speed matter more than the lure size?

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1 hour ago, Bass2Snook said:

Thanks Z. Would you say in addition to these good tips would “cold” snook also be more receptive to very small offerings, or does the retrieve speed matter more than the lure size?

I’ve never changed the size of my offering(s) other than to use more of them, meaning different lures, maybe different jig trailers, slowing things down is my general aim   when those temps bottom out. Moving around more also helps. Tons of snook in the Everglades this time of year, same with tarpon. 

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One thing I learned here since moving. When its very cold like this , fish mid day in shallow warm water. The fish will usually eat then if they eat at all.

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