Newport Striper

Self-maintenance or paid maintenance?

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What considerations should go into DIY reel maintenance vs. paying someone to maintenance? I have some friends who maintenance all of their reels, some who maintenance all but VS reels, some who pay up - where do you recommend drawing the line? With 7 reels in my arsenal it'd get expensive outsourcing the work but I worry about voiding warranties if I do it myself. 

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I maintain all of my reels, the reels in my fishing club, friends and family. This includes baitcasting and spinning reels since we all fish fresh water. If you are mechanically inclined and keep things in order when you take them apart, then it is no big deal. Just clean all the components and put grease on gears and oil on bearings. Nowadays, everyone has a cell phone, so you can take pics of the disassembly step by step. It really isn't that big of a deal. Disassemble one reel at a time and clean properly and don't lose any parts. If you are deathly afraid of taking it apart, then you will have to pay others to clean it for you. If you happen to have two identical reels, that is even better, because you can take one apart, and if you forget a certain sequence, you can look at the other reel. Also there are a lot of you tube videos to help you get started, and always keep you reel schematic for a parts list.

 

As far as warranties go, there usually is only one year after that it doesn't matter. There have been times where I have cleaned a brand new reel right out of the box, because factories have a tendency to over grease everything and slow reels down. JMO, Good luck.

Edited by Cadman T

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Same here.I used to pay somebody to service mine also.Not anymore though I do all my own reels now.Especially after years of amassing say 50 or 60 combos.That would be a huge chunk of change in servicing fees.It’s really not that hard after you do a few.However, it can be frustrating at times lol.So if you are not mechanically inclined and have no patience then by all means send your reels out.

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On 12/1/2021 at 7:18 AM, Cadman T said:

I maintain all of my reels, the reels in my fishing club, friends and family. This includes baitcasting and spinning reels since we all fish fresh water. If you are mechanically inclined and keep things in order when you take them apart, then it is no big deal. Just clean all the components and put grease on gears and oil on bearings. Nowadays, everyone has a cell phone, so you can take pics of the disassembly step by step. It really isn't that big of a deal. Disassemble one reel at a time and clean properly and don't lose any parts. If you are deathly afraid of taking it apart, then you will have to pay others to clean it for you. If you happen to have two identical reels, that is even better, because you can take one apart, and if you forget a certain sequence, you can look at the other reel. Also there are a lot of you tube videos to help you get started, and always keep you reel schematic for a parts list.

 

As far as warranties go, there usually is only one year after that it doesn't matter. There have been times where I have cleaned a brand new reel right out of the box, because factories have a tendency to over grease everything and slow reels down. JMO, Good luck.

Thanks man! Exactly the answer I was looking for. Great advice on working off of identical reels - I happen to have 2 of the same spinning reels so will give it a go

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I agree with Cadman T.  I would also add that in addition to taking photos, thread the drag stack onto a pipe cleaner, or some other type of stick to maintain both the order and orientation as you disassemble. 

 

Download a schematic from the internet and study it before you take the reel apart and follow it as you disassemble/photograph.

 

Oh, and on some spinning reels, the nut holding the rotor in place is a left-handed thread.  

 

You can do it!

Edited by Mike Mendez

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Newbie maintainer here but here are some ideas: 

 

1) need to make sure you have the necessary tools. You can get sets of torx and allen wrenches online that are really small.

2) get an ice cube tray that is a 6 x 6 grid or something like that. A really big ice cube tray. Put parts in there in an order as you dissassemble. 

3) lay down some newspaper to work on, the bigger the better, and make notes on the newspaper or on scratch paper. 

4) when removing screws always check to see if the screws are the same or differrent lengths. Make a diagam so you know which length screw goes where--that's why you need a pen and paper handy. 

5) When pulling pieces apart or out of each other watch for washers that may or may not be stuck in grease or not stuck in grease but could fall off as you remove. 

6) When you come across a part that is not symettrical in every dimension, mark down which part should face which way. 

 

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Do it your self …keep the reel clean …rinse with fresh water after use … lube what you can externally … at end of season make repairs …talk to manufacturer for parts …if you can’t make the repairs due to parts and time vs. maybe time to buy a new real …nothing is cheap especially fishing reels rd1

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Unless it’s something broken covered under warranty, I would do it myself. You can usually find a step by step instructional video for most reels which makes it easier to do yourself. 

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On 12/10/2021 at 3:12 PM, TopStriperAngler said:

Newbie maintainer here but here are some ideas: 

 

1) need to make sure you have the necessary tools. You can get sets of torx and allen wrenches online that are really small.

2) get an ice cube tray that is a 6 x 6 grid or something like that. A really big ice cube tray. Put parts in there in an order as you dissassemble. 

3) lay down some newspaper to work on, the bigger the better, and make notes on the newspaper or on scratch paper. 

4) when removing screws always check to see if the screws are the same or differrent lengths. Make a diagam so you know which length screw goes where--that's why you need a pen and paper handy. 

5) When pulling pieces apart or out of each other watch for washers that may or may not be stuck in grease or not stuck in grease but could fall off as you remove. 

6) When you come across a part that is not symettrical in every dimension, mark down which part should face which way. 

 

And you can use your cellphone to video or take snapshots of component location.. 

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DIY- but don’t crack open the AR/IAR clutch in a Shimano reel. They’re a nightmare to properly reassemble and you will not enjoy it. 
 

Everything else is almost fun for me. 

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One last thing: disassemble/reassemble in a well lit room, on a larger than necessary clear table, with a clear hard floor - not cluttered or carpeted - under that table. 
 

Sometimes a spring or a clickpin can go flying. Good luck finding it if you don’t follow this advice!!!!

 

(ask me how I know - ugh!)

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55 mins ago, EricDice said:

DIY- but don’t crack open the AR/IAR clutch in a Shimano reel. They’re a nightmare to properly reassemble and you will not enjoy it. 
 

Everything else is almost fun for me. 

 

Youtube is helping things. I did open the roller clutch in my Stradic FK to clean it and thanks to a Scoobydoo video I was able to put it back together. Definitely needed my tweezers and the video though. Luckily didn't lose any pieces but could have done so very easily. 

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53 mins ago, EricDice said:

One last thing: disassemble/reassemble in a well lit room, on a larger than necessary clear table, with a clear hard floor - not cluttered or carpeted - under that table. 
 

Sometimes a spring or a clickpin can go flying. Good luck finding it if you don’t follow this advice!!!!

 

(ask me how I know - ugh!)

 

I would say that a carpet can be helpful because it can slow stuff down. I actually worked on a persian type rug this year and was able to find everything. Whereas the white tile bathroom I had previously worked on I'm still finding parts from earlier attempts at self maintenance LOL. 

 

 

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