PeteA

Losing some fish with double treble hooks, why???

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Hey Guys, I heard somewhere that double treble hooks in plugs can sometimes work against each other and cause you to lose fish when you hook up. I'm my last outing I caught about 10 stripers, all shorts, but it sure was good to be catching. I also lost a few. I was definitely hooked up and fighting the fish in but a few fish came off 3/4 of the way in. I notice that the fish I landed had the forward treble hooked in the lower jaw while the back treble was always lightly hooked in the gill plate, top of the head, side of the face, etc. All hooks are sharp and I also the barbs are crimp down to make the release is easier on the fish. I'm sure this could also contribute to the issue. FYI, I was using a Yo-zuri Hydro Minnow. 

 

I was hoping someone could explain exactly what happens on a hook up to have the two ends of the plug work against each other and how this could possibly be avoided. 

 

Thx Guys. 

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Nobody will have anything but a guess. My guess is you were targeting small fish using small plugs that likely were equipped with small hooks. Small fish are usually more aggressive and competitive than larger fish (in my opinion) and that leads to more missed strikes and dropped fish. I've haven't seen too many "sharp" hooks over the years but have seen many who claimed they were. I'd "re-sharpen" my hooks. In my opinion If your problem was one hook working against the other you'd likely see evidence that was the issue such as one or more bent hooks

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If you Google how a lever works you will see how yanking in one direction can allow the opposite end of the plug to push against the fish and cause it to become unhooked. Especially if the hook locks up against the split ring. 
 

In your case I think you should try canal rigging the swimmer so there is no rear hook and the fish can spin and twist without dislodging the hook. You could also try braided line instead of split rings for the connection. 

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A concept that I feel some Surfcaster's don't fully grasp that I learned freshwater bass fishing is that a fast action rod will pull a lot of treble hooks that’s why freshwater fisherman mainly use them for jigs/ soft plastics with a single worm hook, on the contrary a crank bait rod meant for use with tiny treble hooks is very moderate action like a pool noodle, too keep the fish pinned. 

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3 hours ago, PeteA said:

Hey Guys, I heard somewhere that double treble hooks in plugs can sometimes work against each other and cause you to lose fish when you hook up. I'm my last outing I caught about 10 stripers, all shorts, but it sure was good to be catching. I also lost a few. I was definitely hooked up and fighting the fish in but a few fish came off 3/4 of the way in. I notice that the fish I landed had the forward treble hooked in the lower jaw while the back treble was always lightly hooked in the gill plate, top of the head, side of the face, etc. All hooks are sharp and I also the barbs are crimp down to make the release is easier on the fish. I'm sure this could also contribute to the issue. FYI, I was using a Yo-zuri Hydro Minnow. 

 

I was hoping someone could explain exactly what happens on a hook up to have the two ends of the plug work against each other and how this could possibly be avoided. 

 

Thx Guys. 

Small fish,small hooks fish full of piss & vinegar.

 

HH

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Bass throw lures it happens. SP and Hydros I rig single rear and crush barbs on the trebles. You will loose more fish because the barbs are crushed. 

Edited by nfnDrum

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Better to loose a under sized fish than kill it in these times,crush the barbs.  If I'm fishing where all the fish are schoolies I have single hook plugs that I use.

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Don't know the situation that you were fishing in. This was happening to me last week.  Almost evet cast I had small fish on and kept losing them. Finally got one close enough to see it. It was shad. No schoolies around. Persistence is key. 

That fish was caught on the teaser.  Quick pic and set it free. The bass are still here so don't pack it in yet. 

20211123_131200.jpg

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4 hours ago, PeteA said:

Hey Guys, I heard somewhere that double treble hooks in plugs can sometimes work against each other and cause you to lose fish when you hook up. I'm my last outing I caught about 10 stripers, all shorts, but it sure was good to be catching. I also lost a few. I was definitely hooked up and fighting the fish in but a few fish came off 3/4 of the way in. I notice that the fish I landed had the forward treble hooked in the lower jaw while the back treble was always lightly hooked in the gill plate, top of the head, side of the face, etc. All hooks are sharp and I also the barbs are crimp down to make the release is easier on the fish. I'm sure this could also contribute to the issue. FYI, I was using a Yo-zuri Hydro Minnow. 

 

I was hoping someone could explain exactly what happens on a hook up to have the two ends of the plug work against each other and how this could possibly be avoided. 

 

Thx Guys. 

i change all trebles to inline single hooks,from 2/0 to 5/0.

if the plug has 3 hooks i use only 2,back and mitell.

i use 3 hooks only if the lure is suspending,i like the lure be caried horizontal,natural way,if i use 2 hooks and stop ,the lure will be tail down.

if you crank and stop for second,the lure is swiming horizontal..

when you seting hook ,the 3 point need more presure than single hook seting.the single hook is biger then treble and keep the fish beter.

i have 14" fish taking 5/0 hook.

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6 hours ago, PeteA said:

Hey Guys, I heard somewhere that double treble hooks in plugs can sometimes work against each other and cause you to lose fish when you hook up. I'm my last outing I caught about 10 stripers, all shorts, but it sure was good to be catching. I also lost a few. I was definitely hooked up and fighting the fish in but a few fish came off 3/4 of the way in. I notice that the fish I landed had the forward treble hooked in the lower jaw while the back treble was always lightly hooked in the gill plate, top of the head, side of the face, etc. All hooks are sharp and I also the barbs are crimp down to make the release is easier on the fish. I'm sure this could also contribute to the issue. FYI, I was using a Yo-zuri Hydro Minnow. 

 

I was hoping someone could explain exactly what happens on a hook up to have the two ends of the plug work against each other and how this could possibly be avoided. 

 

Thx Guys. 

Welcome to Hickory Shad being mixed in with Stripers! Hickory Shad have very soft mouths and they attack bait right along with schoolies.

 

In order to catch them you'd have to reduce the size of your lure down to a small jig rigged up with a single hook. You can also catch them on smaller sized treble hooks but you'll hook them less consistently because they just can't deal with a three-pronged hook as easily. A single prong hook will allow the fish to inhale the bait and when you go tight you'll be right in the corner of its jaw, which gives you the best chance of landing just about any fish including Hickory shed and Stripers.

 

Sounds like because you were hooking up but losing fish that you were using something relatively small. 

 

Hickory Shad invade the beaches of the Northeast every year from July on and this year they were all over the freaking place. Believe it or not SeaRobins will also be around close to shore and in large numbers while the water remains warm. Larger Sea Robbins will actually take small plugs as they are pretty serious little ambush predators and they too will feed right along with Schoolies Stripers. They have a large enough mouth where you can generally get away with the treble hook & if it's your intention to actually catch one of them, you'll have no problem doing it. That said a single hook again usually works better because it always ends up in the corner of the fish's mouth. A single hook is also better for releasing a fish more easily and it gives the fish a higher chance of survival - bre is one situation where this rule gets thrown out the window. 

 

If you have a swiveling belly mount that you are attaching your hook to you need multiple prongs otherwise your catch rate will dramatically fall off if you're using a single hook. The reason for this is that the fish hits the plug and then immediately turns which causes the hook to spin. If a point isn't facing towards its mouth nothing will catch when it bites down in a single hook could easily spin out of position and be pointing the wrong direction when the fish strikes.

 

Meanwhile if you have a fixed mount you really don't need a treble hook all you need is a single InLine hook.

 

Usually in the Northeast we will get a substantial run and larger Stripers and bigger Bluefish will show up. This will cause the Hickory shed to get destroyed or flee and the Searobins will scatter off the beach at that point also. However at times you could still have the same problem because in the fall you could get a school of Chub Mackerel or pint size Bonito around and you might have some trouble consistently hooking them with a multi-prone hook which is more due to their mouth size and the size of the bait that they are usually on which is usually very small.

 

Herring and Mackerel will hit small jigs because they are forage feeders. Adult Bunker will even occasionally take a small jig though they are filter feeders more than anything. You can also get Spanish Mackerel mixed into all this chaos and you might even catch a Blackfish or a Fluke depending what kind of rocky structure or sandy bottom you are fishing over. Single hooks and smaller lures would definitely be better in most of these scenarios.

 

When you do get a push of larger fish like big Stripers or Blues, you just have to figure out what they're on and then match up with them.

 

For example if Herring show up that usually attracts bigger fish at which point you're probably going to use some larger plugs in which case the treble hooks come into play, again due to the potential presence of swivel hookmounts.

 

Bluefish can be taken with either multi-pronged or single point hooks. 

 

 

 

 

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I agree with SC here that anything that is said here is a guess, at best.  My guess is that the small fish hit the lure headfirst like most bass and the area they target is sometimes between the two hooks so neither get pinned very deeply.  Then throughout the course of the fight the fish gets off.  I have seen this phenomenon on 7 inch redfins and bombers which is why @Redingfin came up with the closer two belly hook system for these which minimized the amount of fish that got off our hooks.

 

One thing is for certain, the hooks are not fully set if this happens.  

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