CaryGreene

Beach Waders - My Top Solutions

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48 posts in this topic

Let's face it, is there really a perfect solution for fishing waders designed for saltwater applications? Nope. There isn't. There are things you can do to prolong the life of whatever solutions you wind up going with. Rinsing is super important if you wind up selecting breathable waders. Salt clogs the pores of breathable fabric and rinsing can help your waders last. You also have to decide whether you're going rock hopping or whether you'll be primarily dealing with sand. Water temps also come into play. Are you fishing in the heat of July or are we talking about walking beaches in April, or even..brrrr, the winter?

 

No solution is perfect, but here's some recomendations that I feel will help most beach fishermen avoid wasting money on solutions that just don't cut it. First of all, most wading equiment is designed for freshwater applicaitons. That's what sells. Most saltwater wading equipment is designed for flats fishing and warm weather again, because that's what sells. So what is an open beach fisherman or a rock hopper supposed to do? Here's my advice. 

 

Best Bet for Open Beaches & Heavy Sand Situations: The biggest issue with Boot-Foot waders, which are my top pick for Saltwater fishing on open beaches, is that eventually, the boot always seems to come apart where it is welded to the breathable leg fabric and no matter who makes the waders, this becomes an issue. Another issue that many bootfoot waders are very uncomfortable to walk in. Therefore, I've elimated most of the pretenders and have whittled it down to three solid recommendations. There were assuridly be other waders that our readers will chime in on within this thread & keep in mind, my job is to get the party started. 

  1. My Top Pick is a pair of Boot-foot waders. If you fish at night, I recommend boot-foot waders even more so. Jelly Fish stings can be painful and you're inevitably going to run into them at some point. Waders will prevent the sting, but unfortunately, over time they will spring leads due to the micro punctures caused by repeated pokes. I use waders designed for Duck Hunting because at least they're built for muck and sometimes for coastal hunting and they are often more durable. An example of an expensive solution would be a cleated bootfoot. Frog Toggs makes a nice pair called the "Grand Refuge" and they feature a 4-ply polyester upper, removable zip-in/out 120 gram insulated liner. They also have Heavy-duty, abrasion resistant nylon in the shin, knee and seat area and have a Zippered flip out security pocket, 2 handwarmer pockets & 2 oversized storage pockets on chest. The boots go on & off fairly easily - as long as you make sure to get them a size or two too big, you'll slide right in easily. The foot-beds in waders like these are very comfortable and walking reasonalbe distances isn't too difficult. Let's face it, sand isn't easy to walk on but it's not like you're going to be walking average distances over a mile on most open beaches. These waders make you pretty much impervious to sand sand and they'll get you into the water and back to the truck very nicely. This is a very pricey, high end solution so keep that in mind as I consider a spend like this to be a lot for a pair of waders. However, you will probably love these if you spring for them. Unfortunately, the warranty is only a one year warranty against worksmanship and defects so keep that in mind. Last year's model looked like this:

61a117499a94d_Screenshot2021-11-2612_16_52PM.png.f54de354af96a9e3fc73b0c334ce34f9.png

 

The newly designed modelfor this year looks like this:

61a13920871f3_Screenshot2021-11-262_43_08PM.png.5bd87e03f19ff6efd6555bcabd03650f.png

The new Multi-climate, breathable, insulated bootfoot camo chest wader with a pateneted removable zippered liner system for complete versatility and adaptive comfort in all weather conditions and they have a new G-buckle suspension straps with D-rings and they have the T-Zip waterproof front zipper for easy on and off. They also feature an Internal zippered flip-out, see-through pocket but best of all, these are 4-ply polyester uppers. You also get 2 fleece-lined hand warmer pockets which come in handy on cold nights and there are 2 oversized storage pockets on chest. 

 

These are high tech waders and Outer Layer is made of Polyester, which is a durable, breathable, lightweight, abrasion-resistant and supple. The Middle Layer is their DriPore Gen 2, which is an extreme water hold-out, maximum breathability, ultra-flexible and lightweight layer and then the Inner Layer is a Nonwoven polypro, which provides an extra measure of wind resistance and heat retention while still being soft, ultralight and breathable. This shell is pretty sweet for surf casting. 

 

The best feature besides the bullet proof, heavy-duty abrasion resistant nylon in the shin, knee and seat areas found on the exterior is the removable zip-in, zip-out PrimaLoft I2001 Silver Insulation 80-gram liner. They've also upped the boot insulation to a 5mm, 1,200-gram Thinsulate fleeced-lined Ridgebuster boot, which is also nice in colder temps. 

 

2. Something a little more reasonablly priced but still 100% Duck Hunting applicaiton would be the Frogg Toggs Grand Passage Breathable Bootfoot Chest Wader. They feature a Zippered flip-out security chest pocket, Internal fleece-lined neoprene hand warmer pocket and Heavy-duty, abrasion-resistant nylon in the shin, knee and seat areas which helps you deal with taking a knee and generally makes them harder to beat up. Waders like these will run a much more affordable $315 and they'll do a great job for you. 

 

With these waders you get adjustable suspenders with low-profile buckles and D-rings, an internal zippered flip-out, see-through pocket, the same awesome 4-ply polyester upper, a zippered front storage pocket with quick-access. You also get the new internal fleece-lined hand warmer pocket and a scaled back 120-gram quilted insulated liner which is zip out & removable, as well as the terrific heavy-duty, abrasion-resistant nylon in the shin, knee, and seat areas and you also get the new 5mm, 1,200-gram Thinsulate Ridgebuster boot. For the money, these are really the best waders going. 

61a13bb77b890_Screenshot2021-11-262_55_10PM.png.6529d53a82fa218a803dab0e5b8a64ac.png

 

4. Frog Toggs also makes a fishing version of the Grand Passage and they have most of the same features and come in at aroung $275. They're build pretty tough, but I still like the waterfowl design a little better for durability. 

61a13dcf4fc73_Screenshot2021-11-263_02_33PM.png.b840a763d4e1b3f05021004be8a162df.png

 

3. Another pretty sweet pair of Bootfoots that represent the higher end of the spectrum would be from Simms, these are their Vibram Soled G3 Guide Riparian Camo Bootfoot Waders. They start with a ddurable, breathable & comfortable GORE-TEX Pro Shell 3-layer upper & 4-layer lower. You get a top access zippered stretch pocket plus zippered, reach-through micro-fleece lined hand-warming pockets. The front & back leg seams deliver articulated fit, improved mobility & increased durability and there is a triple-layer vulcanized rubber upper on boots for maximum durability & wading performance in extreme weather. The boots are fully-lined & insulated with 7-mm neoprene & grid fleece for all-day warmth, comfort & moisture-management. They also have an anatomically-shaped last & removable Right Angle® footbed for a secure & comfortable underfoot ride. The sole is a nice Vibram® ldrogrip rubber with what they call. "self-cleaning lugs" (ehhh) & they feature multidirectional edges for maximum underwater traction. The boots have Independent ESS plates for durability & confident deep-water footing and they are noticiceably comfortable when you're on a full 8 or 12 hour shift. 

 

61a13e97b5079_Screenshot2021-11-263_07_19PM.png.d4d4fc848d7a258dc16877903c43d105.png

 

 

For Rock Hopping and Rocky Beaches with Some Sand: Here is where we change tactics entirely. We want Studded, Saltwater Compatible Wading Boots. They can be worn with shorts in the summer but you may want to wear a pair of Kayaking pants or a Wet Suit bottoms depending on the weather. Defenitely use quality, one piece neoprene socks with Gravel Guards built in,  like these Patagoinia Yulex socks.

 

If you wear these socks with stockingfoot waders on a sandy beach, you will still get a little sand in your boots and over time, that wears the socks out due to abrasion. However, for rock hopping and for rockier beaches, these are perfect to combine with a saltwater-specific boot, which you can add carbide studs to. 

61a142cb9d752_Screenshot2021-11-263_25_08PM.png.eb09f541bfc4ba8028061d4eebf1a3e0.png

 

The Patagonia River Salt boots are really good for Rock Hopping, but you will need to add studs. The good news is that these boots can accept studs no problem. Just screw them in to the stud ready mounts that are built into the Vibranium soles. Boots like this are really designed for wet wading, so to beat the sand if you want to use something like this more as an all purpose solution, you'll need to do one more thing which I'll cover in a moment. 

61a120bcdeb5b_Screenshot2021-11-2612_45_27PM.png.1500ca1c1cffc8a326e6ce87c6a88597.png61a143d914a3c_Screenshot2021-11-263_30_03PM.png.bca5832c0f39ad748a50fcc5474d886a.png

 

Sand will enter boots like this through drainage holes. You can't stop this from happening, but you don't want extra sand spilling in from above your gravel guards. To minimize the ability for sand to enter the boots, simply wear axtra neopbrene gravel guard wrap which can be scured by Velcro. Run this over the upper edge of the gravel guard and you'll have essentially a shin-high set up that will repel sand. 

 

You can wear boots like this with neoprene pants as I mentioned. NRS makes a decent pant. Yes, you're wet-wading but it's a good set up for someone who covers a lot of ground or perhaps wants more support and mobility without the bulky full on boot-foot wader. 

 

61a11f5a72b3c_Screenshot2021-11-2612_53_54PM.png.e13344d1cb135e604a4621055a0e8d45.png61a11f5b8f2c1_Screenshot2021-11-2612_53_45PM.png.f370b69690866f4adfd8318021193bfc.png

 

You can also use Kayak pants in the surf and many are one piece designs. It's easy to walk in them and you don't have to be bogged down by the full upper of a pair of waders. Kayaking pants feature neoprene booties, the same as is found in stockingfoot waders. 

 

Hopefully we can build on this thread over time, but this should get us started and hopeuflly it answers a lot of "how to" questions for people who plan on doing a lot of out front fishing or rock hopping. 

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I also use my waterfowl waders out front on sandy beaches. I user the Rogers Toughman waders that are supposedly identical to previous Frogg Toggs models. One thing I don't like is that when I'm wearing my surf belt, it tends to sit right over the shell holders and can prevent a tight fit. 

I like waterfowl waders a lot, they tend to last longer in my experience, but they can be harder to find without shell holders. 

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53 mins ago, surfcastronaut said:

I also use my waterfowl waders out front on sandy beaches. I user the Rogers Toughman waders that are supposedly identical to previous Frogg Toggs models. One thing I don't like is that when I'm wearing my surf belt, it tends to sit right over the shell holders and can prevent a tight fit. 

I like waterfowl waders a lot, they tend to last longer in my experience, but they can be harder to find without shell holders. 

Good point surfcastronaut. When I'm duck hunting I don't want my shells stored on the exterior of my waders,  so I don't know why waterfowl waders seem to always be made with shell holders. 

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There is a very important thing to all of this.

How often would you use them?

Few times a year or a few times a week?

Few times a year, almost  any lower prized waders may do a dissent job.

With few times a week, you do not want to take your chances with lower end.

 

Edited by Popasilov
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22 hours ago, reelfire said:

USIA waders. Check them out. Youll thank me later. Get kevlar knees and full zipper. Youll thank me later.

Not breathable though right? That's a drawback for all season use. I haven't seen a pair in person. 

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6 hours ago, hunter123 said:

I also wear my Lacross boot foot hunting waders for surf fishing in cold weather.

Lacross makes some good equipment. Is there a pair you think are the best? Are they breathable?

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7 hours ago, CaryGreene said:

Not breathable though right? That's a drawback for all season use. I haven't seen a pair in person. 

 Breathable is over rated. If its hot i unzip them and Im fine. 

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High and Dry all day every day! Manufactured by a division of an aquaculture company that needed waders that would stand up to their crews being in the water 8 hours a day. They couldn't get anything available to do the job so they started making their own.  Choice of brown or Camo, Neoprene or breathable and 800 or 1500 Thinsulate in the boot. They are also Kevlar reinforced.  The boot comes up to size 15 and has the highest natural rubber content in the industry. My size (15) breathable is $345. Said to be comparable to Sitka which are in the $1000 range.

Marc

Edited by mml4

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11 hours ago, CaryGreene said:

Lacross makes some good equipment. Is there a pair you think are the best? Are they breathable?

I bought mine 10 years ago and use them alot. There still runnng strong with no leaks.I bought a pair of breathable boot foot, at the time they were about $ 250.00. Breathable do work great. I prefer them over neopreen. I rinse them off after an outing and spray them with a sealer every two years.. You layer under breathables and they will work great.

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29 mins ago, R.R. Bridge Fisher said:

Any reviews of the LL Bean Kennebec waders?

I bought a pair of the waist high foot stocking waders a few years ago for trout fishing. I only use the boot foot for surf fishing. The Kennebec are a good wader for the price, no there not Simms, or other top brands, but they work. You get what you pay for.

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On 11/26/2021 at 3:41 PM, CaryGreene said:

Let's face it, is there really a perfect solution for fishing waders designed for saltwater applications? Nope. There isn't. There are things you can do to prolong the life of whatever solutions you wind up going with. Rinsing is super important if you wind up selecting breathable waders. Salt clogs the pores of breathable fabric and rinsing can help your waders last. You also have to decide whether you're going rock hopping or whether you'll be primarily dealing with sand. Water temps also come into play. Are you fishing in the heat of July or are we talking about walking beaches in April, or even..brrrr, the winter?

 

No solution is perfect, but here's some recomendations that I feel will help most beach fishermen avoid wasting money on solutions that just don't cut it. First of all, most wading equiment is designed for freshwater applicaitons. That's what sells. Most saltwater wading equipment is designed for flats fishing and warm weather again, because that's what sells. So what is an open beach fisherman or a rock hopper supposed to do? Here's my advice. 

 

Best Bet for Open Beaches & Heavy Sand Situations: The biggest issue with Boot-Foot waders, which are my top pick for Saltwater fishing on open beaches, is that eventually, the boot always seems to come apart where it is welded to the breathable leg fabric and no matter who makes the waders, this becomes an issue. Another issue that many bootfoot waders are very uncomfortable to walk in. Therefore, I've elimated most of the pretenders and have whittled it down to three solid recommendations. There were assuridly be other waders that our readers will chime in on within this thread & keep in mind, my job is to get the party started. 

  1. My Top Pick is a pair of Boot-foot waders. If you fish at night, I recommend boot-foot waders even more so. Jelly Fish stings can be painful and you're inevitably going to run into them at some point. Waders will prevent the sting, but unfortunately, over time they will spring leads due to the micro punctures caused by repeated pokes. I use waders designed for Duck Hunting because at least they're built for muck and sometimes for coastal hunting and they are often more durable. An example of an expensive solution would be a cleated bootfoot. Frog Toggs makes a nice pair called the "Grand Refuge" and they feature a 4-ply polyester upper, removable zip-in/out 120 gram insulated liner. They also have Heavy-duty, abrasion resistant nylon in the shin, knee and seat area and have a Zippered flip out security pocket, 2 handwarmer pockets & 2 oversized storage pockets on chest. The boots go on & off fairly easily - as long as you make sure to get them a size or two too big, you'll slide right in easily. The foot-beds in waders like these are very comfortable and walking reasonalbe distances isn't too difficult. Let's face it, sand isn't easy to walk on but it's not like you're going to be walking average distances over a mile on most open beaches. These waders make you pretty much impervious to sand sand and they'll get you into the water and back to the truck very nicely. This is a very pricey, high end solution so keep that in mind as I consider a spend like this to be a lot for a pair of waders. However, you will probably love these if you spring for them. Unfortunately, the warranty is only a one year warranty against worksmanship and defects so keep that in mind. Last year's model looked like this:

61a117499a94d_Screenshot2021-11-2612_16_52PM.png.f54de354af96a9e3fc73b0c334ce34f9.png

 

The newly designed modelfor this year looks like this:

61a13920871f3_Screenshot2021-11-262_43_08PM.png.5bd87e03f19ff6efd6555bcabd03650f.png

The new Multi-climate, breathable, insulated bootfoot camo chest wader with a pateneted removable zippered liner system for complete versatility and adaptive comfort in all weather conditions and they have a new G-buckle suspension straps with D-rings and they have the T-Zip waterproof front zipper for easy on and off. They also feature an Internal zippered flip-out, see-through pocket but best of all, these are 4-ply polyester uppers. You also get 2 fleece-lined hand warmer pockets which come in handy on cold nights and there are 2 oversized storage pockets on chest. 

 

These are high tech waders and Outer Layer is made of Polyester, which is a durable, breathable, lightweight, abrasion-resistant and supple. The Middle Layer is their DriPore Gen 2, which is an extreme water hold-out, maximum breathability, ultra-flexible and lightweight layer and then the Inner Layer is a Nonwoven polypro, which provides an extra measure of wind resistance and heat retention while still being soft, ultralight and breathable. This shell is pretty sweet for surf casting. 

 

The best feature besides the bullet proof, heavy-duty abrasion resistant nylon in the shin, knee and seat areas found on the exterior is the removable zip-in, zip-out PrimaLoft I2001 Silver Insulation 80-gram liner. They've also upped the boot insulation to a 5mm, 1,200-gram Thinsulate fleeced-lined Ridgebuster boot, which is also nice in colder temps. 

 

2. Something a little more reasonablly priced but still 100% Duck Hunting applicaiton would be the Frogg Toggs Grand Passage Breathable Bootfoot Chest Wader. They feature a Zippered flip-out security chest pocket, Internal fleece-lined neoprene hand warmer pocket and Heavy-duty, abrasion-resistant nylon in the shin, knee and seat areas which helps you deal with taking a knee and generally makes them harder to beat up. Waders like these will run a much more affordable $315 and they'll do a great job for you. 

 

With these waders you get adjustable suspenders with low-profile buckles and D-rings, an internal zippered flip-out, see-through pocket, the same awesome 4-ply polyester upper, a zippered front storage pocket with quick-access. You also get the new internal fleece-lined hand warmer pocket and a scaled back 120-gram quilted insulated liner which is zip out & removable, as well as the terrific heavy-duty, abrasion-resistant nylon in the shin, knee, and seat areas and you also get the new 5mm, 1,200-gram Thinsulate Ridgebuster boot. For the money, these are really the best waders going. 

61a13bb77b890_Screenshot2021-11-262_55_10PM.png.6529d53a82fa218a803dab0e5b8a64ac.png

 

4. Frog Toggs also makes a fishing version of the Grand Passage and they have most of the same features and come in at aroung $275. They're build pretty tough, but I still like the waterfowl design a little better for durability. 

61a13dcf4fc73_Screenshot2021-11-263_02_33PM.png.b840a763d4e1b3f05021004be8a162df.png

 

3. Another pretty sweet pair of Bootfoots that represent the higher end of the spectrum would be from Simms, these are their Vibram Soled G3 Guide Riparian Camo Bootfoot Waders. They start with a ddurable, breathable & comfortable GORE-TEX Pro Shell 3-layer upper & 4-layer lower. You get a top access zippered stretch pocket plus zippered, reach-through micro-fleece lined hand-warming pockets. The front & back leg seams deliver articulated fit, improved mobility & increased durability and there is a triple-layer vulcanized rubber upper on boots for maximum durability & wading performance in extreme weather. The boots are fully-lined & insulated with 7-mm neoprene & grid fleece for all-day warmth, comfort & moisture-management. They also have an anatomically-shaped last & removable Right Angle® footbed for a secure & comfortable underfoot ride. The sole is a nice Vibram® ldrogrip rubber with what they call. "self-cleaning lugs" (ehhh) & they feature multidirectional edges for maximum underwater traction. The boots have Independent ESS plates for durability & confident deep-water footing and they are noticiceably comfortable when you're on a full 8 or 12 hour shift. 

 

61a13e97b5079_Screenshot2021-11-263_07_19PM.png.d4d4fc848d7a258dc16877903c43d105.png

 

 

For Rock Hopping and Rocky Beaches with Some Sand: Here is where we change tactics entirely. We want Studded, Saltwater Compatible Wading Boots. They can be worn with shorts in the summer but you may want to wear a pair of Kayaking pants or a Wet Suit bottoms depending on the weather. Defenitely use quality, one piece neoprene socks with Gravel Guards built in,  like these Patagoinia Yulex socks.

 

If you wear these socks with stockingfoot waders on a sandy beach, you will still get a little sand in your boots and over time, that wears the socks out due to abrasion. However, for rock hopping and for rockier beaches, these are perfect to combine with a saltwater-specific boot, which you can add carbide studs to. 

61a142cb9d752_Screenshot2021-11-263_25_08PM.png.eb09f541bfc4ba8028061d4eebf1a3e0.png

 

The Patagonia River Salt boots are really good for Rock Hopping, but you will need to add studs. The good news is that these boots can accept studs no problem. Just screw them in to the stud ready mounts that are built into the Vibranium soles. Boots like this are really designed for wet wading, so to beat the sand if you want to use something like this more as an all purpose solution, you'll need to do one more thing which I'll cover in a moment. 

61a120bcdeb5b_Screenshot2021-11-2612_45_27PM.png.1500ca1c1cffc8a326e6ce87c6a88597.png61a143d914a3c_Screenshot2021-11-263_30_03PM.png.bca5832c0f39ad748a50fcc5474d886a.png

 

Sand will enter boots like this through drainage holes. You can't stop this from happening, but you don't want extra sand spilling in from above your gravel guards. To minimize the ability for sand to enter the boots, simply wear axtra neopbrene gravel guard wrap which can be scured by Velcro. Run this over the upper edge of the gravel guard and you'll have essentially a shin-high set up that will repel sand. 

 

You can wear boots like this with neoprene pants as I mentioned. NRS makes a decent pant. Yes, you're wet-wading but it's a good set up for someone who covers a lot of ground or perhaps wants more support and mobility without the bulky full on boot-foot wader. 

 

61a11f5a72b3c_Screenshot2021-11-2612_53_54PM.png.e13344d1cb135e604a4621055a0e8d45.png61a11f5b8f2c1_Screenshot2021-11-2612_53_45PM.png.f370b69690866f4adfd8318021193bfc.png

 

You can also use Kayak pants in the surf and many are one piece designs. It's easy to walk in them and you don't have to be bogged down by the full upper of a pair of waders. Kayaking pants feature neoprene booties, the same as is found in stockingfoot waders. 

 

Hopefully we can build on this thread over time, but this should get us started and hopeuflly it answers a lot of "how to" questions for people who plan on doing a lot of out front fishing or rock hopping. 

 

On 11/26/2021 at 9:04 PM, surfcastronaut said:

I also use my waterfowl waders out front on sandy beaches. I user the Rogers Toughman waders that are supposedly identical to previous Frogg Toggs models. One thing I don't like is that when I'm wearing my surf belt, it tends to sit right over the shell holders and can prevent a tight fit. 

I like waterfowl waders a lot, they tend to last longer in my experience, but they can be harder to find without shell holders. 

 

On 11/26/2021 at 9:59 PM, reelfire said:

USIA waders. Check them out. Youll thank me later. Get kevlar knees and full zipper. Youll thank me later.

 

4 hours ago, reelfire said:

 Breathable is over rated. If its hot i unzip them and Im fine. 

 

1 hour ago, mml4 said:

High and Dry all day every day! Manufactured by a division of an aquaculture company that needed waders that would stand up to their crews being in the water 8 hours a day. They couldn't get anything available to do the job so they started making their own.  Choice of brown or Camo, Neoprene or breathable and 800 or 1500 Thinsulate in the boot. They are also Kevlar reinforced.  The boot comes up to size 15 and has the highest natural rubber content in the industry. My size (15) breathable is $345. Said to be comparable to Sitka which are in the $1000 range.

Marc

 

40 mins ago, R.R. Bridge Fisher said:

Any reviews of the LL Bean Kennebec waders?

Another great thread Cary!!!! Thank you sir!
I’m very interested in this thread.

I currently own LL Bean’s. When they wear out, which I assume will be soon, I need to have a replacement.

Unfortunately this coming summer I’m moving to SoCal.
*Breathable IS MOST DEFINITELY IMPORTANT. 
* I do not want a shell holder or camo coloring.

* I do not need insulation.

* I do walk a lot and cover ground, comfort is important.

* I will be semi-retired so I be fishing a lot. Durability is also important.

*They do not need to be currently in stock and am willing to order ahead and wait.
I know sone are thinking, why do you need waders in SoCal. Three reasons. 1st the water is generally cold & the air temp gets chilly in winter, especially in predawn hours. Secondly, lots of jellyfish and tons of stingrays. Finally, once my genitals get wet and sandy, the clock is ticking. I can only walk & fish so long before chaffing is a problem. 
I’d love to hear your recommendations!

Thanks in advance!

JD

Edited by jjdbike

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27 mins ago, mml4 said:

High and Dry all day every day! Manufactured by a division of an aquaculture company that needed waders that would stand up to their crews being in the water 8 hours a day. They couldn't get anything available to do the job so they started making their own.  Choice of brown or Camo, Neoprene or breathable and 800 or 1500 Thinsulate in the boot. They are also Kevlar reinforced.  The boot comes up to size 15 and has the highest natural rubber content in the industry. My size (15) breathable is $345. Said to be comparable to Sitka which are in the $1000 range.

Marc

Reasonably priced breathables for $339. These are 4 layer waders that probably stack up well to some of the more expensive products from Simms or Frogg Toggs. Looks like a pretty nice option for Bootfoots. 

 

61a36fcf1e002_Screenshot2021-11-287_00_49AM.png.6d05356fa9114271e7c4f8c23da320b2.png61a36fd05d3a9_Screenshot2021-11-287_00_30AM.png.557228098218078e7b1b0a142cf17636.png

 

These High & Dry waders certainly look like they have a lot of great features, once again showing why waders designed for marshes are generally the best bet for salwater applications. Here are some features of the High ‘N Dry Breathable Chest Waders: Neoprene reinforced knees with exterior with kevlar protection, Four-layer breathable fabric throughout entire wader, Sonic Welded; Multi-layer seam sealing technology, Available in Mossy Oak® Shadow Grass Blades, Mossy Oak® Bottomland, and Brown, Thinsulate + Neoprene + Synthetic Wool insulation in two boot options = 800g & 1500g eq., 55% natural rubber reinforced boots, Exterior rainproof pocket, interior zippered pocket, reach through chest pocket and best of all: Men’s sizes 7-15 in Regular, Stout, and Tall

 

A HUGE issue in buying waders is proper fit. Any company that offers regular, stout and tall sizing is a godsend for surf fishermen because we come in all sizes. This is a really big deal. 

 

Regarding whether you should go with breathable vs. non-breathable waders, I personally like the breathable variety as I fish a lot and the breathable wader lets me layer accordingly, which is one advantage. The other advantage is, if you wear moisture wicking base layers, you will remain dry and warm. Moisture build up is what makes you cold. When you slide out of a pair of non-breathable waders after a full shift, you don't want to be sopping wet in your own sweat. There is a bit more to this conversation to consider though. 

 

If you typically don't walk too far and mostly remain fairly stationary during a fishing shift, non-breathable waders are fine. But, if you move a lot and walk a lot, covering ground, non-breathable waders are a terrible choice vs. breathable ones, mainly because with the breathable wader, a very active surf-caster will remain comfortable and dry. I often stop off for a beer or a chowder after I fish and I'm very active, so keep my advice here in context. 

 

There are certain things I look for in a pair of waders. The most important aspect of a wader for use in saltwater is durability and that's the bottom line. I've purchased $500 waders from Orvis and literally stepped off a puddle jumping airplane -- in Alaska, and had my boot fill up with frigid water as I walked to shore. Quality control and durability are super important. Any company that doesn't fully appreciate this simply can't be taken seriously. 

 

Also, we are saltwater fisherman. Waders need to be built to handle the demands of what we do, day in, night out. They need to last. 

 

Other important factors include the comfort of boot when walking and then, how easily can you get the waders on and off comes into play. I had a pair of Simms Muck Boot Waders that were super hard to get into and I bought them fairly true to size, which was a big mistake. The fabric on the waders was ridiculously light and not durable, which was also a problem.  

 

This is why I always recommend wearing waders one size too large -- a better strategy that than a snug fit. 

 

It's cool to see how certain companies are moving to the forefront of wader design. The value that some of these brands that are nudging their way to the front of the line is pretty impressive. 

 

If anyone else has used the High&Dry brand waders and also tried other brands, it would be great to get your feedback in this thread so please chime in and also, mention any other brands that you'd fully 100% endorse. 

 

Personally, I'm all for solutions that don't break the bank, so value vs durability would be one of the main takeaways from this thread. Also, don't forget warranty. High&Dry by the way, has a one-year warranty. Also, they sell to consumers direct so you won't be able to try these on in advance wich is a bit of drawback, but not necissarily a deal breaker for most I would think. 

 

 

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