nfnDrum

Mahi? How far north do they get?

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Mahi one of my favorite fish to eat, How far north do they go? I've never heard of them being caught anywhere close to us here in the northeast.

Edited by nfnDrum

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August usually brings the warmer Blue Water closer to shore with it the Tuna's and Mahi. Pretty common to find Mahi hanging under the Lobster Pot floats 6-8miles off New York Harbor and if lucky some SkipJack.

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23 mins ago, XBMX said:

August usually brings the warmer Blue Water closer to shore with it the Tuna's and Mahi. Pretty common to find Mahi hanging under the Lobster Pot floats 6-8miles off New York Harbor and if lucky some SkipJack.

OK that is close. I was thinking the Carolina's, are their any NE party boats that target them? 

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Just now, nfnDrum said:

OK that is close. I was thinking the Carolina's, are their any NE party boats that target them? 

You'll be better off with a Light Tackle charter.

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I’ve run into them on structure within a mile or two from shore in August/September. I’ve even heard reports of them caught from an inlet near me on the south shore of LI.

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13 mins ago, XBMX said:

You'll be better off with a Light Tackle charter.

I'm hard pressed to find guys to chip in. 

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3 mins ago, C.Robin said:

I’ve run into them on structure within a mile or two from shore in August/September. I’ve even heard reports of them caught from an inlet near me on the south shore of LI.

REALLY! that sounds like a treat 

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I’ve seen chickens more than a few times on RI party boats targeting fluke. They’re certainly not reliable. I’ve also caught them (small) well under 1 mile of NJ, again not common but it’s happened more than a few time. 
 

John McMurray runs light tackle charters and he get his share. 

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1 hour ago, nfnDrum said:

Mahi one of my favorite fish to eat, How far north do they go? I've never heard of them being caught anywhere close to us here in the northeast.

South of Block Island and MV almost regularly. Only once have I seen them at the elbow ledge between Newport RI and Middletown.

 

 

 

 

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I think that they're regularly caught off Massachusetts during the summer when warm water eddies break off of the Gulf Stream.

 

I fish out of Fire Island Inlet, NY, and regularly make targeted mahi trips when I want to eat fish; over the last few years, it's been easier to put a bunch of mahi on ice than to catch legal fluke.  I usually cast to float, which can be anything from pot buoys to a lost fish tote or chum pail.  Usually, I throw bucktails, but I've recently found that they'll climb all over a 3/4 oz. Creek Chub Striper Strike (last summer I had an 11-pounder that made a pass at the popper, missed, and ended up being foul hooked in the side precisely halfway between its head and its tail; ended up being like trying to pull a plank in sideways, with the fish doing circles around the boat without trying very hard, although my wife finally managed to reach it with a gaff).

 

When they're not under float, I'll troll a mix of small surface chuggers, feathers/jets, and a deep-running Rapala or two.  Usually get bigger fish that way, but they can be few and far between.  At the same time, skunks are rare.

 

And I often get some of my biggest fish accidentally when I'm shark fishing.  It takes a decent-sized mahi to wolf down a whole mackerel.  Also see smaller ones in the slick and feed them appropriate baits.

 

The guys who really load up tend to fill livewells with peanut bunker, then chum with the bunker and fish baits.  I didn't have a livewell included when I had my boat built, so i don't do that, and I'd rather toss lures at them anyway.  But they catch a lot of fish on peanuts.

 

When I first started fishing offshore in the late 1970s, mahi were occasionally caught, but were semi-unusual catches, except in the canyons or when someone happened across a tree or railroad tie floating offshore.  Now, with a warming ocean, they've become a part of the normal species mix off New York and southern New England.  We're seeing more wahoo, too, but I'm still working out how to target those,.

 

 

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