Capt.Castafly

Great Bridge locations that you might have fished.

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I'm getting nostalgic here remembering the "Good Ole Days."

Growing up as kids our dads would take us to some good early spring fishing locations once the season began to evolved.

We'd go down to the local bait shop, gather a dozen clam worms, dress warm, a wool hat/gloves, grab a cup of hot chocolate.  

I'd grab my Penn Squid 140M Reel and Rod and we were good, a day of bonding and being with dad learning more about our world.

There was always a good chance to catch a early winter flatfish at these location.  There were plenty around back then laying in the mud. 

 

White Church Bridge was our favorite, It was close to home, only a few miles away, we'd park along the chain link fence at Barrington High School.

Warren, Barrington Bridges, and the Train Trestles. The sinkers, hooks, fishing rigs tangling from the power lines always left an impression on me.

Middle Bridge, Narrow River, probably the most famous and popular early season location. First location to catch a fish.

Stone Bridge, Island Park, Portsmouth/Tiverton, moving out to bigger water.

Railroad Bridge in Island Park

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Edited by Capt.Castafly

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Nannaquaket and Escape Bridge’s  in Tiverton for flounder and very early bass.  The old Jamestown Bridge for nighttime shadow line bass.  I suspect not many of us left who actually fished there.  Guys would document the cows by writing the weights of fish caught on the hand rails.  My teenage years sneaking out on the Newport Bridge at night , generally getting thrown off repeatedly  by the bridge authority, so often that eventually they knew me by name.  Goat Island Causeway was my favorite haunt. 

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I have great memories of driving over Jamestown bridge at night as a kid and seeing the fisherman there.  It was crazy because they were literally 2 feet away from the road on the little 'walkway' for lack of a better term ! Now that I'm a ( supposedly ) adult, I read all the great names that fished there and wonder if those were the guys I used to see !!!

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31 mins ago, Mandoborg said:

I have great memories of driving over Jamestown bridge at night as a kid and seeing the fisherman there.  It was crazy because they were literally 2 feet away from the road on the little 'walkway' for lack of a better term ! Now that I'm a ( supposedly ) adult, I read all the great names that fished there and wonder if those were the guys I used to see !!!

Lots of guys fished it.  Daignault, McKenna, and another bunch of the Narragansett guys.  Pretty much all humped over the rail peering into the shadows.  As small as that sidewalk was it was often the side without the sidewalk that had the bite.  Now that was the really scary side!  Young and stupid and all for a friggin fish - yes me. 

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 My days there were few, but a contingent of guys used to fish the old Jamestown Bridge. Only one side of the bridge had a sidewalk, and it was fished from the mainland side before the rise in elevation. The lamp posts provided fixed light that attracted bait and predators lurked in the darkness below the bridge.

 

As a rule guys cast bucktails, ordinarily Smilin’ Bills at the time, upcurrent and drifted them into the shadows with the hope of a large bass, blue, or squeteague. Following a hookup they’d use a grapple gaff to hoist the fish. 

 

Needless to say it was both dangerous and illegal to fish there, and the police responded regularly.  Also remember a gang livelining herring from the trestle over the Warren River.

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White Church Bridge, behind the old American Tourister building, Warren/Palmer River Bridge, Barrington River Bridge and the trestles were our favs as kids growing up. 

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I grew up in Queens, NY. Practically lived at the North Channel Bridge in Howard Beach. Used to catch flounder at the old Howard Beach Bridge too. Learned how to dig blood/sand/tape worms at low tide, dig for steamers, net spearing, killies, and grass shrimp (which made an excellent tog bait BTW). You could practically walk across the bay on the massive schools of bunker.

 

 

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White Bridge Barrington....late 50's early sixties, .as a little ****, tarred hand lined flats with my Grandmother(lived at Deep Rock on Washington Road)....bycatch white perch...didn't take long........

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RI has some wonderful bridges to fish. I went to college in RI and perhaps the most valuable knowledge I gained during those 4 years was my introduction to fishing the bay. 
 

I remember buying a 6’ boat road to more comfortably drift clams at the warren and barrington bridges in the spring. This often produced the first few keepers of the year. I haven’t used that rod since. 
 

My first ever squid came from goat island. What cool creatures…

 

I also spent many afternoons tog fishing the old railroad bridge on the Portsmouth side. I’d switch to bass when the sun went down as did the group of Cambodians who frequented the spot at that time. I remember they liked to drink and use curly tail grubs on a jig head with the tail clipped short. They would basically just cast a bit up current and retrieve straight in after letting it sink a bit but never touching bottom. The bottom there was about the snaggiest I’ve ever fished. This odd technique was effective as I would often struggle to keep pace with the high hook of the Cambodian group. Funny enough the high hook was almost always the same guy who was seemingly the drunkest. As you could imagine not many fish were released by this entertaining and skilled group. I never confronted them myself about it as I was often alone and they numbered at least a half dozen. My calls to DEM were also never met with any real action.

 

 

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The little bridges at colt state also provided me with endless hours of entertainment. Many of my first schoolies of the season were taken there as the providence holdovers drop out and look to chew. I’ve lucked into some big bluefish blitzes as well as some odd ball sightings including keeper tog practically finning in shallow water, worm hatch blitzes and a 3 ft lamprey!

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Middle bridge  for  [flats]

 

Barrington & warren  bridges at night when herring were in 

 

Hicks bridge all winter for Tom cod  and a few winter flats  , once in a while  white perch ......... oysters on the north side 

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Some good stuff here, have mentioned a lot of classics I have either fished myself or have known about from others. Old Jamestown Bridge is from before my time in RI but seems like that would have been a unique spot. Were people clustered at a prime section of it or was it all holding? Fish and bait in transit? Usually within a spot there's a spot or two of envy.

 

Have bottom fished the the old railroad bridge on the Portsmouth side but only tried after dark a couple of times, no bass for me there (may have been timing calendar wise) but I was also challenged by the strong flow. Didn't quite take the nail down what the differential between turn and tide times are there.

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One of the most memorable, unique, and bizarre place I fished was the Crawford Street Bridge.

It actually had a history of being the World's Widest Bridge at one time. Some of it has been dismantled.

To those that don't know its location or name, it has been replace by Water Place Park in Providence.

Back in the day, it was the most polluted, foul smelling river in Rhode Island.

Two highly industrial rivers conversed at the foot of College Hill in front of the Court House.  

Every thing imaginable was in the water from oil, textile dye, raw sewage, to animal waste.

There were thousand of rats that ran the banks as large as beavers.

The City of Providence actually had a few fishing contest there, just to promote how dirty and lifeless the place was.

The one species was caught, and that was a small eel about six inches long.

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