bob_G

West end outfall pipe issue still looms

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338 posts in this topic

41 mins ago, bob_G said:

Well, it was overwhelmingly voted down.  But from where I sat, I was really surprised at how many people were there in support of the pipe.

I was prepared to speak, but the moderator shut down any more public input. 

So far, a win for the canal and Buzzards Bay. However, the problem is still there. What will become of all the wastewater and nitrogen?

It was a non-binding vote, so it'll probably still happen.

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55 mins ago, bob_G said:

....

So far, a win for the canal and Buzzards Bay. However, the problem is still there. What will become of all the wastewater and nitrogen?

 

 Two alternatives, take your pick.

 

1) Redirect the outflow pipe to an area in the vicinity of Cleveland Ledge.

 

2) Redirect sewerage to an area north of the Wareham plant and dump it in an appropriate land mass. 

 

 

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7 mins ago, Joe G said:

 

 Two alternatives, take your pick.

 

1) Redirect the outflow pipe to an area in the vicinity of Cleveland Ledge.

 

2) Redirect sewerage to an area north of the Wareham plant and dump it in an appropriate land mass. 

 

 

I like #2, rice paddies instead of cranberry bogs.............................

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55 mins ago, MrJingles said:

It was a non-binding vote, so it'll probably still happen.

I'm afraid you're right. I have no doubt we'll be revisiting this topic at a later date.  Hopefully I'll be living in Idaho or someplace else by then.:laugh:

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The only time that I attended Town Meeting in Bourne, there were as many non-binding "sense of the town" questions on the warrant as meaningful ones. One reason why it was the only one I went to.

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On 11/16/2021 at 8:04 AM, bob_G said:

So far, a win for the canal and Buzzards Bay. However, the problem is still there. What will become of all the wastewater and nitrogen?

Bob, I have never responded directly to any of your post, but read them often ... just to set the record. 

 

Not trying to be argumentative, but I am trying to understand why you oppose this? Do you not buy the scientific explanations? Just trying to understand what people are thinking ... thanks

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18 hours ago, jeffreyrichard said:

Bob, I have never responded directly to any of your post, but read them often ... just to set the record. 

 

Not trying to be argumentative, but I am trying to understand why you oppose this? Do you not buy the scientific explanations? Just trying to understand what people are thinking ... thanks

Jeff,

 

I fully understand the scientific explanations. But I also understand what I've observed with my lying eyes over 50 years.

 

My concerns are increased nitrogen levels, and reduced water salinity.

Elevated nitrogen levels have decimated our eel grass beds not only in Bourne, but all over Buzzards Bay. Eel grass is one of the key building blocks in our bays and estuaries.  Bay scallops require eel grass to survive and reach maturity. It's no coincidence that we have no more bay scallops in Bourne. 

Some of our most productive, once pristine shellfish beds are now covered in a brown layer of sticky, slimy growth.  Smothering juvenile quahogs, scallops, and oysters. This is a byproduct of elevated nitrogen.

 

3,000,000-10,000,000 gallons of treated water doesn't sound bad, does it? After all, we won't see it because it will flow into the canal via an ungrounded, underwater pipe. The old "out of sight out of mind" mantra.

 

But just to put it in some sort of perspective we can all understand.

A tractor trailer tanker truck holds 10,000 gallons of water.   Dumping 3,000,000 gallons of water into the canal will be the equivalent of 300 tractor trailer tanker trucks lined up from the MMA, down Academy Drive, all the way down Main Street Buzzards Bay. Each and every day, 365 days a year, 24/7.  

10,000,000 gallons of treated water would be the equivalent of 1000 tractor trailer tanker trucks lining up every day, waiting to empty their ranks into the pristine canal. What will this nitrogen rich water do to the bay? How can this volume of freshwater not lower water salinity?

 

Does this still seem like a good idea?

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29 mins ago, bob_G said:

But just to put it in some sort of perspective we can all understand.

A tractor trailer tanker truck holds 10,000 gallons of water.   Dumping 3,000,000 gallons of water into the canal will be the equivalent of 300 tractor trailer tanker trucks lined up from the MMA, down Academy Drive, all the way down Main Street Buzzards Bay. Each and every day, 365 days a year, 24/7.  

10,000,000 gallons of treated water would be the equivalent of 1000 tractor trailer tanker trucks lining up every day, waiting to empty their ranks into the pristine canal. What will this nitrogen rich water do to the bay? How can this volume of freshwater not lower water salinity?

 

Does this still seem like a good idea?

We've been over this before, but yes those sound like big numbers when they stand alone. When you compare it to the 20 billion gallons PER TIDE that passes through the canal, those numbers are minuscule. The dilution factor is GIGANTIC.

 

If you understand the science, why are you still concerned about nitrogen? Did you read the scientific report I posted in the last thread about this very same topic? Are you sure you understood it? I'll post it again fro your reference:

 

https://www.savebuzzardsbay.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/01/WHOI_Final_Hydrodynamic_Report.pdf

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6 mins ago, MrJingles said:

We've been over this before, but yes those sound like big numbers when they stand alone. When you compare it to the 20 billion gallons PER TIDE that passes through the canal, those numbers are minuscule. The dilution factor is GIGANTIC.

 

If you understand the science, why are you still concerned about nitrogen? Did you read the scientific report I posted in the last thread about this very same topic? Are you sure you understood it? I'll post it again fro your reference:

 

https://www.savebuzzardsbay.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/01/WHOI_Final_Hydrodynamic_Report.pdf

Are you serious? Nitrogen has destroyed all our eel grass beds.  For decades.  We once had an area in Bourne known as the Hayfields. This massive area had eel grass so dense, it could stop an outboard in 50'. An adult makye could not wade through it.

Fast forward to today.  There is no more eel grass. It's gone. This was just one area in town and Buzzards Bay. Our bay scallop fishery is gone.

 

Once again, printed reports are rhetoric. Words.  At this point in my life I rely on my eyes. What I see, and experience daily, weekly, annually.

Mr Jingles, I suspect you don't live on the coast, nor really have a dog in this fight.  Why are you so enthusiastic about dumping this water in my town?

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31 mins ago, MrJingles said:

 

 

If you understand the science, why are you still concerned about nitrogen? 

How many tanker trucks would you line up, twice a day, to equal 20 billion gallons? Lol.

 

You're trying to convince people who's minds are firmly and permanently made up.

They are people who don't know the difference between science and rhetoric. 

No amount of facts can change that.

It would be more productive to dive into the "pristine waters" of the canal and swim against the tide.

Good luck with that.:)

 

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On 11/16/2021 at 8:04 AM, bob_G said:

Well, it was overwhelmingly voted down.  But from where I sat, I was really surprised at how many people were there in support of the pipe.

I was prepared to speak, but the moderator shut down any more public input. 

So far, a win for the canal and Buzzards Bay. However, the problem is still there. What will become of all the wastewater and nitrogen?

Out into the aquifer 

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Bourne residents and town officials best keep another item in mind.

 

If it's finally decided that the outfall pipe will discharge into the canal, you can rest assure that Joint Base Cape Cod will recommend that its new wastewater outfall pipe also discharge into the canal.

 

Currently, Joint Base discharges its waste water "near the canal".  There have been talks between the Sandwich and Joint Base folks to redirect that wastewater directly into the canal.

 

Ya got a slippery slope here.  Bourne folks best be aware of it.    

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I love when people who live miles away from the coast,  and have little to know shellfish experience aside from eating them, tell us what a great opportunity this is for our town. All their knowledge is based on something they read in an article.

:point:

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3 mins ago, Joe G said:

Bourne residents and town officials best keep another item in mind.

 

If it's finally decided that the outfall pipe will discharge into the canal, you can rest assure that Joint Base Cape Cod will recommend that its new wastewater outfall pipe also discharge into the canal.

 

Currently, Joint Base discharges its waste water "near the canal".  There have been talks between the Sandwich and Joint Base folks to redirect that wastewater directly into the canal.

 

Ya got a slippery slope here.  Bourne folks best be aware of it.    

Excellent point Joe. That never occurred to me.

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