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Salvaged Lumber

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from this past summer. Some will be "barnboard" for a feature wall in my living room, some of it is different hardwoods and the rest is either pine 2x4s or pine boards.  All from salvaged pallets, used once and clean.......

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1 hour ago, Gilbey said:

Cool :th:

How do you check for random nails?? 

I take them apart myself so I can inspect each one closely.  I try to take pallets with softwood runners so the nails pull out easely and I can account for every one.  I know some guys who use  inexpensive metal detectors.  I have been doing this for about three years now and have been using a special "pallet buster" pry bar that works excellet separating the boards from the runners.  I might also add that in the past three years I have not changed my planer blade because of nail strikes. but I think they dullen faster on reclaimed wood than new wood although I think it's a small price to pay.

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That's quite a nice mess o' wood ya got there B. I'm jealous, and can see lotsa projects there. I use a Little Wizard to check my reclaimed stuff before it goes near a saw or planer. I trust it to about 8/4 material, both sides scanned. I missed one nail once in twenty years. Cost me new planer blades.

Lesson learned, look harder. 

A friend has built a company just building stuff from pallets. He's got a couple of them de-nailer guns. Makes quick work of it. 

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1 hour ago, Ben Lippen said:

That's quite a nice mess o' wood ya got there B. I'm jealous, and can see lotsa projects there. I use a Little Wizard to check my reclaimed stuff before it goes near a saw or planer. I trust it to about 8/4 material, both sides scanned. I missed one nail once in twenty years. Cost me new planer blades.

Lesson learned, look harder. 

A friend has built a company just building stuff from pallets. He's got a couple of them de-nailer guns. Makes quick work of it. 

Those de-nailer guns are cool. 

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Great to see you recycling these! I've never understood the economics of pallets. How can it really be more expensive to ship them back to the point of origin for re-use than to buy new?  Seem like that should be one of the things on the table as we try to keep the planet from cooking.

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15 hours ago, gellfex said:

Great to see you recycling these! I've never understood the economics of pallets. How can it really be more expensive to ship them back to the point of origin for re-use than to buy new?  Seem like that should be one of the things on the table as we try to keep the planet from cooking.

They don't have to go back to the point of origin. Just back into the supply chain ( Ya mighta heard of that term lately ) at the nearest point. Buddy of mine used to make extra money at night collecting pallets in his pickup. He'd stack them way high and strap them down, and bring them to a place that sent certain ones to certain places, where needed. 

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5 mins ago, Ben Lippen said:

They don't have to go back to the point of origin. Just back into the supply chain ( Ya mighta heard of that term lately ) at the nearest point. Buddy of mine used to make extra money at night collecting pallets in his pickup. He'd stack them way high and strap them down, and bring them to a place that sent certain ones to certain places, where needed. 

Cool, but still leaves open the question that puzzles me, how is it really possible that cutting down trees, processing them into lumber, transporting that lumber to a mill that makes pallets, and then transporting the pallets to the product to be shipped's manufacturer, is cheaper than simply bringing an existing palette back to the manufacturer? Similarly, it's more expensive to recycle paper then process trees into pulp.  

 

It seems to me this shows something is being misvalued along the line in the lumber industry. I've read that western Forest Service lands undervalue the lumber issue cutting permits for.

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55 mins ago, gellfex said:

Cool, but still leaves open the question that puzzles me, how is it really possible that cutting down trees, processing them into lumber, transporting that lumber to a mill that makes pallets, and then transporting the pallets to the product to be shipped's manufacturer, is cheaper than simply bringing an existing palette back to the manufacturer?

Okay, I thought I was clear but...

My friend picked up used pallets from various commercial and residential places, then took them to a warehouse where they were then sorted and redistributed into the supply chain in the area. They keep going round and round. 

Roofing company gets a pallet of forty five square of shingles. Guy orders twelve, they need another pallet to put that twelve on for shipping. It's cheaper to keep using the pallets that are nearby, then trying go back to where they started.

 

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6 mins ago, Ben Lippen said:

Okay, I thought I was clear but...

My friend picked up used pallets from various commercial and residential places, then took them to a warehouse where they were then sorted and redistributed into the supply chain in the area. They keep going round and round. 

Roofing company gets a pallet of forty five square of shingles. Guy orders twelve, they need another pallet to put that twelve on for shipping. It's cheaper to keep using the pallets that are nearby, then trying go back to where they started.

 

I understand, but the question is literally more global.

Found this:

Quote

Wooden Pallets Cost Us More Than You Know!
Posted on November 6, 2019 by Glen Munholland
Do you realize that we produce about 500 million pallets a year in the US alone to replace the worn pallets that we discard each year? The number of pallets out there is truly staggering. Nearly 2 billion wooden pallets are currently in circulation in the US with a majority of them replaced each year. This consumes an estimated 50 percent of the country’s annual hardwood harvest and is equivalent to 7.6 billion board feet of lumber. That’s enough wood to cover an area 10 times the size of New York city. This also represents a very significant market for the lumber industry to the tune of $6 billion in annual sales especially when one considers that roughly half of these pallets are intended to be used only once and then discarded. And since the pallets tend to be full of galvanized nails that are hard to remove, a large percentage of these single-use pallets usually end up in landfills.

This seems such a waste when you consider that companies can derive revenue from timber byproducts such as fuel pellets, building materials, mulch, insulation, and many others. I wonder what readers might make of the fact that one single application consumes as much hardwood in the US annually as all others combined? These facts have led some environmental groups to label wooden pallets as a major waste of resources and to call for their replacement with more ecologically friendly alternatives.

And this, whose numbers don't seem to add up. 

Quote

The U.S. Wood Pallet Picture
When it comes to the U.S. pallet system, here are some of the key pallet statistics, courtesy of U.S. Forest Service:

Total pallets in service are probably over 2 billion
There were 416 million new pallets manufactured in 2011
There were 474 million used pallets recovered in 2011
Of those pallets recovered, 326 million of them were again sold as pallets
The other 148 million pallets were recycled to other products
Millions of old pallets still end up in landfills every year, however, about one-quarter of these are recovered for recycling at landfills
Roughly 43 out of every 100 pallets purchased are recovered pallets

 

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2 hours ago, Ben Lippen said:

I won't get into a debate about nature here. It's not the right forum. Take those thoughts elsewhere. 

Sure, but compartmentalizing like that is how we end up with no fish, bad air, bad water and no trees.  The thread title is 'salvaged lumber'. I question why it's there to be salvaged at all. And apparently less than half are.  It bothers me the same as cutting Southern hardwood to make into 'green' heating pellets to ship to Europe.  Bad math somewhere.

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