dreyko

Heavier than an 8wt?

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Looks like a 10 wont be unreasonable if its modern. 

So about lines, I have been fishing a floater on my 8wt (orvis Salt All Arounder) and would be using a orvis Striper coldwater Intermediate on the 10wt (i have a new line laying around already).

I am interested in the spey style heads for versitility, how do I choose a shooting head for a single hand rod? I assume I pick a head with a standard 10wt grain weight? Wouldn't a sink tip screw that up? Should I go light on the head?

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I don’t think modern has much to do with it. IMHO, modern rods are off by a size, you want to throw a 10 then look at a 9. 
 

The entire thing is all screwed up, lines a half size heavier, rods are really one wt higher. 
 

Ultimately, good  casting will eliminate any issues. 

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If you only had one rod I’d recommend a 9wt but since you already have the 8wt for light days there’s no need to compromise……get a 10wt with a reel that balances it well and you’ll have the best of both worlds.

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Drey.

I think you want a shooting head system - not a Spey type line.

There are so many good integrated lines with short heads now that you don't have to use heads.

Unless you mean that you want to change densities during the day.

It's a real pita to do that -IMO. Just carry an extra spool.

Heb

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Tough to beat a nice, modern lightweight 9wt fly rod.  Fishing for Outer Banks Albies USED to be "where 10wts go-to-die" but I've switched to lightweight 9wt rods the last 3-4 seasons.  Plenty tough/backbone to bust big bruiser Albies.  Pleasure to cast as well...

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The above is right, it kind of depends on what you're used to and what 8wt rod you own.  If your 8wt rod is something like a TFO TicRx then you would want to bump up to a 10wt rod.  If your 8wt is a wimp of an 8 (or true rated 8), then take a look at a well built 9wt rod that has some extra cajones.

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14 hours ago, Drew C. said:

I don’t think modern has much to do with it. IMHO, modern rods are off by a size, you want to throw a 10 then look at a 9. 
 

The entire thing is all screwed up, lines a half size heavier, rods are really one wt higher. 
 

Ultimately, good  casting will eliminate any issues. 

 

 

 

This is absolutly true, as is the case with most lines an rods.  Makes the whole weight system seem more a marketing ploy than a true rating system.  I purchased a 9wt igniter back last winter and its every bit a 10wt trapped in an 8wt skin. Super slim an light blank with power i havent come across in any other 9 weight iv fished. Also the best flyrod iv ever fished.   Rods make more of the materiels used now than ever before and it calls to question what it means to be an 8, 9, 10 weight rod etc.  Materiels have become so light an powerful that weight is really a non-issue.  Guys used to fish heavy glass rods with the same love and success we find in graphite, an ounce or two shouldnt matter to your enjoyment or your casting.

Edited by DeepBlue85

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7 hours ago, Killiefish said:

The above is right, it kind of depends on what you're used to and what 8wt rod you own.  If your 8wt rod is something like a TFO TicRx then you would want to bump up to a 10wt rod.  If your 8wt is a wimp of an 8 (or true rated 8), then take a look at a well built 9wt rod that has some extra cajones.

So my current "quiver" is as follows;

3wt orvis frequent flyer 

4/5 tfo finesse glass

6wt orvis frequent flyer 

6wt tfo ticr

8wt tfo ticr

And recently gifted a 7wt tfo bvk blank that my friend is building for me. 

The 2 ticrs are my favorites even though the 3wt frequent flyer casts like an absolute treat.

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8 hours ago, DeepBlue85 said:

 

 

 

This is absolutly true, as is the case with most lines an rods.  Makes the whole weight system seem more a marketing ploy than a true rating system.  I purchased a 9wt igniter back last winter and its every bit a 10wt trapped in an 8wt skin. Super slim an light blank with power i havent come across in any other 9 weight iv fished. Also the best flyrod iv ever fished.   Rods make more of the materiels used now than ever before and it calls to question what it means to be an 8, 9, 10 weight rod etc.  Materiels have become so light an powerful that weight is really a non-issue.  Guys used to fish heavy glass rods with the same love and success we find in graphite, an ounce or two shouldnt matter to your enjoyment or your casting.

The first 'modern' rod that I got was a Sage X 6wt (I built it). At that point I hadn't bought a flyrod in close to 20 years. I'm looking at lines, so I get a 6wt, the line is  a 'half size heavy', I figure it will work. Nope,  it's underlined. I get a 7, better but still not great. I basically gave up on the rod at that point. I almost sold it a few times but it wasn't a cheap blank or build. Recently, I bought Rio Outboud Short Heads (I had thread whining about that), they're not weighted like the heads that I'm familiar with. Going 1 size up like I did in the past and I'm overloaded.... I did get a 7 head and it's awesome on the Sage X but that's 265gr - that's just shy of a 10 on the affta scale.

 

When I started, the lines used amongst the guys that I fished with were pretty much SA, Airflow and Teeny (horrible, absolutely horrible). You got the line size for your rod, maybe up one wt but that was it - easy. None of us used Rio at that time. At some point we did and we generally loved their lines. We didn't know it at the time but they were a half size heavy but that's why they casted well.

 

The entire thing is confusing and useless.

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If you get a 10, take a look at Left Kreh's casting video on youtube. Keeping your elbow low can prevent lifelong shoulder damage. 

Edited by Tin Boat

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No reason to fear a real 10 wt. Rotor cuff damage can happen with a 6 wt if your arm position is out from your body side  too far. A lot of guys cast with their upper arm stuck out from the side. That’s hello to long term trouble. Shoulder is not designed to work that way.

I cast single hand spey lines and inspite of what’s claimed on the box they are not great overhead lines. The Rio product 6 wt is pretty close to an 8/9 wt line to AFTM std. It needs to be that way to make a good spey line. If you have a powerful rod then it will handle the extra grains for an overhead cast. I cast mine on an old Sage One. It casts ok but it sags in the air. For saltwater great if you are fishing flat water and Spey casting.

Shooting heads in the salt well  you don’t mind constant tangles why not. Most commercial heads are 30 feet. That’s short if you are seeking distance and the paradox here is SH are meant to be distance lines. General guide line is two line sizes up for a 30 foot head.

A normal Long  head WF line will get you to 90 feet if you can cast well. A SH will not get you there just because it is a SH . The old caveat will always  apply. It is the caster not the rod or the line although a proper set up makes it easier.

An 8 wt on the beach even in the hands of a good caster is a tough gig. Why struggle when a good cast and a 10 wt really is the best option.

Mind how many guys actually bother to cast into any head wind. From what I have seen on the Cape precious few. Wind at back or non casting hand side you can cast what you like.

mike

Edited by Mike Oliver

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