dreyko

Heavier than an 8wt?

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Hello all 

I am getting into saltwater fishing. I am mostly casting into the sound at the NC Outer Banks. So far I have caught a few blues, a needle fish, and a grey trout (weakfish). Hoping to target mostly blues, reds, and striper. Maybe some false albacore as the outerbanks are supposed to be good for them.

I have a 3wt, 6wt, and an 8wt. I am hoping to manage heavier flies into stronger wind and would like a heavier rod to do so.

I would prefer not to go up only 1 line size, but I feel like the 10wt could be too much rod. I do not expect to be in a boat so everything is in knee high water.

Alternatively I could go with a 2 hand switch rod. Maybe a switch 7 or 8 may buy me line speed and help with heavier flies.

Any advise?

Thanks!

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Drey,

A Switch rod will not gain you line speed - BUT - it will gain you grains which will help with large flies.

IMO - investigate a well designed #10 with a light swig weight.  Hint - it's not the $1,000 rods you read about - and it should be able to be loaded with a #10 line.

Herb

 

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Blind casting a single-handed 10 wt over and over for hours at a time is a recipe for misery and elbow problems in my experience. It can be done if the rod is light, moderate action,  you are young with solid casting fundamentals, and distance is not important but even then it is hardly fun.

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I'm 83 yrs old - 5'8 - 150#.

When fishing the beaches I always use a #10.

Just have to have the right rod/ line combo.

Herb

 

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In NC, wouldn't a 10 wt be a given for Albies?  I'd also think it's best if you need to fish the heavier sink lines in rips. Today's rods are lighter, but rods were already light when I started.  There's a bunch of great, economical choices.

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I'd get the 10. When conditions warrant big flies or heavy wind, use it. You have almost all other conditions covered with the 8. Then you'll be prepared. 

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You want to deal with wind and heavier flies, and you already have an 8wt. 10wt is a no brainer...90% of my beach fishing is done with a 10wt. The right one has no more discernable swing weight than most 8's.

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10 hours ago, Kml said:

Albies is mostly a boat game. 

Maybe just get a better 8wt. 

The better 8wt won’t help if your casting sucks. 
 

I’d prefer to cast a 9 all day but if someone told me to pick a rod, not knowing where or what I’m doing - it would be a 10wt, with out a friggin doubt. 

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A 10wt will do anything a 9wt will and then some, with the right line an proper mechanics it shouldn't be a problem casting one.  I'd look at a tfo axiom 2x in a 10wt.

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I have fished the sounds of Outer Banks for over 40 years.  I use 7 or 8 wt most of the time.  When it is really windy (a lotto the time) I will grab a 9 wt.  I really like the RIO OSB for covering water.  I have a friend who is a wading /kayak guide and he used the OBS either floater or the 15' hover tip 

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Posted (edited) · Report post

Irrespective of which is the best choice for the OP a good 10 wt not a bloody 12 wt in disguise is just not a difficult or tiring rod to use for a whole tide of 6 hours or more.

If our cast is poor a 6 wt will not feel good after an hour or two. Most of us are reasonable strong beings men and women. A 10 wt rod is not a beast.

If you have to make stupid numbers of false casts and or double hauls then it’s you that is the problem.

FWIW I cast a CTS Affinity MX it’s a piece of cake even the X version which is a bit quicker.

As to a 10 wt. being  too much rod. It’s a noodle compared to most 1 to 2 Oz spin rods, Why are us Fly Boys so bloody unreal.

 

mikey

Edited by Mike Oliver

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Posted (edited) · Report post

My main rod for the beach for bigger fish and flies is a 11 wt running an outbound short. Gets the job done. I simply don't blind cast non stop. Read the water and cast to likely holding spots take breaks when needed, shorten your time by fishing the most productive part of the tide.  No need to cast for 8 hours. Do it right and a 4 hour trip is all you need, unless you run into an all day blitz then your paying for it the next day with a smile on your face

Edited by onthefly

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