Richard_the_Aughth

Toggin ain't easy

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We went for some tog this afternoon from shore. 4 dinks, no keepers. On my last cast I hooked into what felt like a monster, pulled at least 3 or 4 times as hard as the shorts I caught. Finally it snapped the line, right at the barrel swivel. I'm using 30lb braid and I used a Palomar knot to a barrel swivel. The other side is 50lb mono leader with the hook and weight. Should I have tied the braid directly to the mono using slim beauty, or some other similar knot? I wonder if this would be harder to break than Palomar to barrel swivel. I'm also planning to upgrade to 60 lb braid next time

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It’s amazing how hard they fight. Your line probably hit a rock. I use 50lb braid to a clip and then tie my rigs with 40lb mono with a swivel on the end so I can change rigs in just a couple seconds. I very rarely break off to a fish but am also fishing from a boat. 

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Palomar to a barrel is what I use, and never have failures.  50lb braid/barrel/50lb leader. 

I'll bet I saw 25 Cordells snapped off this summer, and in almost each case the braid snapped on the braid/mono splice.

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18 mins ago, bob_G said:

Palomar to a barrel is what I use, and never have failures.  50lb braid/barrel/50lb leader. 

I'll bet I saw 25 Cordells snapped off this summer, and in almost each case the braid snapped on the braid/mono splice.

I always super glued my knots. 

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39 mins ago, Richard_the_Aughth said:

We went for some tog this afternoon from shore. 4 dinks, no keepers. On my last cast I hooked into what felt like a monster, pulled at least 3 or 4 times as hard as the shorts I caught. Finally it snapped the line, right at the barrel swivel. I'm using 30lb braid and I used a Palomar knot to a barrel swivel. The other side is 50lb mono leader with the hook and weight. Should I have tied the braid directly to the mono using slim beauty, or some other similar knot? I wonder if this would be harder to break than Palomar to barrel swivel. I'm also planning to upgrade to 60 lb braid next time

How long was your leader? I use like 6-8 ft 30# fluoro direct to the braid, so it's more like a topshot. reduces the likelihood of them breaking you off on a rock or a barnacle covered piling. I'm real close in, if I were offshore where the real pigs are I'd probably use 50 or 60#.

Edited by gellfex

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I use 2 basic rigs, simple fishfinder and other is a dropper with a weak bottom link if I fish certain type of structure.

Both include a 3ft length of #40 floro above the hook length.

Mainline # 40 braid uni to the 40 top shot basic clinch to 80 lb swivel, basic clinch to hook length 40 floro.

Having braid direct to a hook length is going to loose you fish around rocks and structure, a length of 50 mono where I use 40 floro is good insurance.

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32 mins ago, gray gables said:

I always super glued my knots. 

The braid to mono splice didn't appear to fail. In almost each case the braid failed on the cast, perhaps going through the guides. Each time with a resounding snap.

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Yea I think I need a much longer mono leader, maybe 6ft minimum. If that's the case then I need to use a braid to mono knot. I usually do well with these but like bobG said, eventually it snaps off.

[Edit]

At least casting 4 oz metals.

Edited by Richard_the_Aughth

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13 hours ago, Richard_the_Aughth said:

We went for some tog this afternoon from shore. 4 dinks, no keepers. On my last cast I hooked into what felt like a monster, pulled at least 3 or 4 times as hard as the shorts I caught. Finally it snapped the line, right at the barrel swivel. I'm using 30lb braid and I used a Palomar knot to a barrel swivel. The other side is 50lb mono leader with the hook and weight. Should I have tied the braid directly to the mono using slim beauty, or some other similar knot? I wonder if this would be harder to break than Palomar to barrel swivel. I'm also planning to upgrade to 60 lb braid next time

Had that a few times and upgraded my setup to 50ln braid using alberto knot to a 8-10ft 50lb leader. Then a swivel and add my 30lb sinker line and 50lb leader to hook. Some people I know were using 80lb on the hook but those are getting annoying to tie.

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4 mins ago, foxfai said:

Had that a few times and upgraded my setup to 50ln braid using alberto knot to a 8-10ft 50lb leader. Then a swivel and add my 30lb sinker line and 50lb leader to hook. Some people I know were using 80lb on the hook but those are getting annoying to tie.

Yea I'm going to try that next time, thanks

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Where could a guy get a primer on the how’s and what nots of inshore Tog’n? I realize a search here likely has value but wondering if there are other resources. I’d like to learn about and explore it for the future. Is it strictly a boat game?  Thanks in advance.

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Just now, Tfole said:

Where could a guy get a primer on the how’s and what nots of inshore Tog’n? I realize a search here likely has value but wondering if there are other resources. I’d like to learn about and explore it for the future. Is it strictly a boat game?  Thanks in advance.

 

I can give you a break down of what I have learned.

 

Your basic rig is a weight at the bottom, and about a ft above you tie in a dropper loop and attach your hook. The hook should only stick out about 2 inches from the line. Then you attach this rig to your main line, which should be pretty strong. It seems like 50 lb braid to 50 lb mono is good. If you fish a rocky area with lots of current you want the mono to be at least 6 ft long, otherwise a big tog could break you off. 

 

As for weights, you want to hold bottom. I have used up to 5 oz sinkers, but it depends on where you are fishing. You do not need to cast to catch these fish. Just lob it out about 5 ft from where you are standing and keep the line tight.

 

Rods should be short, I use a 7ft mojo inshore, which can only cast up to 1 1/4 oz, but like I said I am still throwing 5 oz sinkers because I am not casting, just lobbing it out there. There are probably better rods, I just happened to have this one and it works fine. You want some sensitivity because tog are smart fish, and they will nibble at the bait several times before its in their mouth. Shorter rod makes it easier to hook set, and it also easier to deal with if you are fishing a jetty.

 

Reel does not matter to much, I use an old Penn I had. You are just dropping the bait so you dont need much line capacity. Set your drag as tight as possible. The idea of fighting these fish is to get them up as fast as possible, or there is a good chance they will bury in the rocks and break you off. From my last fishing trip, I determined a little drag might be good, so rather than lock it down, lock it down and twist left a quarter inch or so, just so that if the fish really pulls, you have a smaller chance of breaking off.

 

Bait is green crabs. Green crabs, green crabs, green crabs. You can catch on other things. I have caught one on a seaworm by accident, but it will be no accident when you catch on green crabs. Cut them in half and you might have to remove all the legs as well. The tog is a smart fish and will pick off the legs.

 

Your hook should be real small, especially if fishing from shore. I use a size 1 gamakatsu hook. These hooks are sharp and small enough to fit in the togs mouth without alerting them to it so they spit it out. Size 1/0 might be ok too.

 

Fighting the fish is tough. Youll feel them tapping, but dont set the hook. Wait until a couple of good taps, then set it. I am not the best at this, but I can tell there is a lot of practice involved. When the fish are in, if you are not getting taps, you probably dont have any bait. That was the case for me yesterday. Non stop action but we only caught 4(and one monster hooker as well that broke my line). Just be patient, you will miss a lot, but when you do hook one, reel like a madman.

 

Finally, location. Find a good spot. A good spot that no one knows about and dont tell anyone about it. Jettys, piers, bridge pilings, thats what you are looking for. Tog eat crabs and muscles and things like that, and these creatures grow on rocks ans structure, so that is what you are looking for. I fish through the peak of high tide, that seems best for me, but it probably depends on location. Regardless, I still recommend trying your luck at high tide. The water is higher and the fish come in with the tide(I think). Please do not ask me where I fish for tog. I will never tell you. I suggest you do the same. Nothing is worth than making a long drive to your favorite jetty, and you are stuck on the shallow side because someone beat you to the deeper end. These fish are more likely to be caught in deeper water, from what I have seen. Ive had an occasion of this happen to me, and the guy sat the deep end were pulling in more tog than us. We were getting hits, but not as many.

 

Last but not least, dont put your fingers in its mouth! They have some nasty teeth, in case you didnt know. The meat is firm and white and tastes very good. I am surprised I never see this fish in the market. Dont get me wrong, its not life changing, but its tastier than striper, and well worth the challenge.

 

Good luck!

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1 hour ago, Tfole said:

Where could a guy get a primer on the how’s and what nots of inshore Tog’n? I realize a search here likely has value but wondering if there are other resources. I’d like to learn about and explore it for the future. Is it strictly a boat game?  Thanks in advance.

John Skinner has some good shore fishing videos. Jigs are more fun to fish than standard sinker rigs for me. 

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3 hours ago, Richard_the_Aughth said:

 

I can give you a break down of what I have learned.

 

Your basic rig is a weight at the bottom, and about a ft above you tie in a dropper loop and attach your hook. The hook should only stick out about 2 inches from the line. Then you attach this rig to your main line, which should be pretty strong. It seems like 50 lb braid to 50 lb mono is good. If you fish a rocky area with lots of current you want the mono to be at least 6 ft long, otherwise a big tog could break you off. 

 

As for weights, you want to hold bottom. I have used up to 5 oz sinkers, but it depends on where you are fishing. You do not need to cast to catch these fish. Just lob it out about 5 ft from where you are standing and keep the line tight.

 

Rods should be short, I use a 7ft mojo inshore, which can only cast up to 1 1/4 oz, but like I said I am still throwing 5 oz sinkers because I am not casting, just lobbing it out there. There are probably better rods, I just happened to have this one and it works fine. You want some sensitivity because tog are smart fish, and they will nibble at the bait several times before its in their mouth. Shorter rod makes it easier to hook set, and it also easier to deal with if you are fishing a jetty.

 

Reel does not matter to much, I use an old Penn I had. You are just dropping the bait so you dont need much line capacity. Set your drag as tight as possible. The idea of fighting these fish is to get them up as fast as possible, or there is a good chance they will bury in the rocks and break you off. From my last fishing trip, I determined a little drag might be good, so rather than lock it down, lock it down and twist left a quarter inch or so, just so that if the fish really pulls, you have a smaller chance of breaking off.

 

Bait is green crabs. Green crabs, green crabs, green crabs. You can catch on other things. I have caught one on a seaworm by accident, but it will be no accident when you catch on green crabs. Cut them in half and you might have to remove all the legs as well. The tog is a smart fish and will pick off the legs.

 

Your hook should be real small, especially if fishing from shore. I use a size 1 gamakatsu hook. These hooks are sharp and small enough to fit in the togs mouth without alerting them to it so they spit it out. Size 1/0 might be ok too.

 

Fighting the fish is tough. Youll feel them tapping, but dont set the hook. Wait until a couple of good taps, then set it. I am not the best at this, but I can tell there is a lot of practice involved. When the fish are in, if you are not getting taps, you probably dont have any bait. That was the case for me yesterday. Non stop action but we only caught 4(and one monster hooker as well that broke my line). Just be patient, you will miss a lot, but when you do hook one, reel like a madman.

 

Finally, location. Find a good spot. A good spot that no one knows about and dont tell anyone about it. Jettys, piers, bridge pilings, thats what you are looking for. Tog eat crabs and muscles and things like that, and these creatures grow on rocks ans structure, so that is what you are looking for. I fish through the peak of high tide, that seems best for me, but it probably depends on location. Regardless, I still recommend trying your luck at high tide. The water is higher and the fish come in with the tide(I think). Please do not ask me where I fish for tog. I will never tell you. I suggest you do the same. Nothing is worth than making a long drive to your favorite jetty, and you are stuck on the shallow side because someone beat you to the deeper end. These fish are more likely to be caught in deeper water, from what I have seen. Ive had an occasion of this happen to me, and the guy sat the deep end were pulling in more tog than us. We were getting hits, but not as many.

 

Last but not least, dont put your fingers in its mouth! They have some nasty teeth, in case you didnt know. The meat is firm and white and tastes very good. I am surprised I never see this fish in the market. Dont get me wrong, its not life changing, but its tastier than striper, and well worth the challenge.

 

Good luck!

I have to say I have never read a worst essay on tog fishing.

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