bob4

Epoxy finishing

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First off I'm a hobbiest and have only built 3 rods so far and working on my 4th. Trying to figure what I might be doing wrong on finishing. My finishes are OK but not as smooth as others. I seem to get a  bit of wavy-ness in my finishes. I'm using flex coat high build and putting it on at higher speeds but not so fast as it's slinging the stuff.  I pass an alchohol torch lightly underneith for bubbles I then let it dry at 9RPMs. I have tried a couple/three thin coats and a few coats placed on heavier. Just wondering if there's not something else I can try to get it on there better. Please believe I've watched videos till I'm mezmorized. 

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We have no idea what you are using to apply the finish, waviness is often uneven application of finish and too much in one place. I use around 200 rpm to apply finish and I don't paint it on, I allow the finish to be pulled off the applicator by the rotation of the wrapper. The finish will self level if allowed to with minimum input from us, the more you fuss with it,the more problems I have experienced. On long finish applications I have used lateral tip to butt strokes to help it level if applying with small brushes like the throw away variety.

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Thanks. I use the simple plain brushes from Mud hole " Throw away type". 200RPM is probably alot faster than I have tried. 

5 hours ago, spoonplugger1 said:

 I allow the finish to be pulled off the applicator by the rotation of the wrapper. 

Interesting. 

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where do you live? Nerbs territory? 

 

I think doing finish right is not as easy as it seems. While I don't like FC (hate it) it's still an ok finish. I put small amounts on at a time, I have no idea what rpms I am at, not the sort of thing that I've paid attention to. I put a little on, even it out and move onto the next guide. Depending on how the finish is setting up I might get the entire rod done or I might mix up some more. Once I'm done I go back and make sure it looks ok. If so, I hit it with a small butane torch to get any bubbles out, just a brief hit and that's it. I don't like touching it once I have hit it with the flame. My first coat is thin, generally thin coats after but for me, it's easier to go thin first then put heavy coasts on if I want. And when I say thin/small amounts I would say do what you think is a small amount, then use half of that.

 

ps - some pics would help.

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When you are done applying the finish. Brush it horizontally ( along the blank ) a few time. This will create flow channels for the epoxy to level, eliminating the wavy rings you are seeing.  Learn this from B40 in his nerbs workshop.

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I like to apply my finish while the rod is still on my wrapper. I spin by hand to apply horizontally using thin coats. 
This method allows me to go back to see if I applied too heavy as the epoxy will sag while I work on other guides. I can remove excess at this point and use it for other guides avoiding lumps waves and pregnant looking finishes.
After epoxy is complete, I transfer to the dryer, clean up edges while it rotates.

I go a little heavier on the second coat and finish with a third thin coat.

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bob4

 

Great question, my finish used to be that way as well.  That is until we shot our Catch the Wave video and I finally understood what Roger has been trying to teach me for years.  200 rpm motor is a big help.  Work from the tip to the butt.  This allows the finish to get further along in the chemical process before you get to the larger butt wraps. Check out this video:

 

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200 RPM's is excessive and probably a contributing factor. I found early on that 10-20 RPM produced a better product, applieing finish as the rod spins. For me the thin throw away brushes were best. They also fit under guide feet better. Next don't try to use every last drop of your mix. Make small batches, sometimes I'll mix three times for a 9-10ft rod for one coat. Attempting to stretch finish that is starting to set up even via heating is a no no. As mentioned horizontal strokes are the ticket. You'll also attain a superior finished product by waiting until each coat is fully dry before applying the next coat.

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