WannaBe1982

Data for interpreting curent

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Hey guys, I’m just a wanna be who puts a rod in his hand. I’ve been trying to learn as much as I can from the old timers and friends around. This site has been a very useful resource for googans like me. 
 

With that out of the way: does anyone know how to determine the speed of the current before planning a trip? Or is it one of those things you find out once you drop your line? 
 

Thanks for your help (and make the cheap shots funny at least). 

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Before planning a trip, depending on where you're fishing, consider tide, moon, littoral drift, and whether the wind will be with or against them.

 

On the water, watch how and where the water piles up as it passes over and around both seen and submarine structure at different phases of current and moon.

 

In the end, the only way to learn is to get out and observe how certain conditions impact then current in the areas where you fish.

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A good source would be to get the Eldridge Tide and Pilot  book for the area you fish.  Wealth of information including current info at various stages of the tide.A30EE699-027C-4C50-8328-11C002D65D18.jpeg.389aaf63f1612f1e25784af23edfcae4.jpeg

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15 mins ago, DZ said:

A good source would be to get the Eldridge Tide and Pilot  book for the area you fish.  Wealth of information including current info at various stages of the tide.A30EE699-027C-4C50-8328-11C002D65D18.jpeg.389aaf63f1612f1e25784af23edfcae4.jpeg

I'll  second that motion.

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Same idea: Tidelog which I use as fishing log. It has the current displayed below for the version you bought and corrections based on current location. Probably just as easy to look up at NOAA.gov 

F42DDE82-2077-4531-ADAC-43E00CAD7B44.jpeg

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4 hours ago, CWitek said:

Before planning a trip, depending on where you're fishing, consider tide, moon, littoral drift, and whether the wind will be with or against them.

 

On the water, watch how and where the water piles up as it passes over and around both seen and submarine structure at different phases of current and moon.

 

In the end, the only way to learn is to get out and observe how certain conditions impact then current in the areas where you fish.

How would you consider the littoral drift without being at the beach? From the structure that’s been there and judge based upon erosion or accretion?

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18 hours ago, WannaBe1982 said:

Hey guys, I’m just a wanna be who puts a rod in his hand. I’ve been trying to learn as much as I can from the old timers and friends around. This site has been a very useful resource for googans like me. 
 

With that out of the way: does anyone know how to determine the speed of the current before planning a trip? Or is it one of those things you find out once you drop your line? 
 

Thanks for your help (and make the cheap shots funny at least). 

 

Other than the canal, I don't know that I've ever thought about the actual speed of the current.  Inlet fisherman  are probably more tuned in to it as well.  

 

I do think of it in terms of the direction it's pushing.  Fish will look for obstructions, depressions, anything, to rest behind/in, often while simultaneously looking for food being brought to their face by the current like a conveyor belt.  Try to put your bait up current so it get's on the conveyor belt to their face. 

 

 

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1 hour ago, WannaBe1982 said:

How would you consider the littoral drift without being at the beach? From the structure that’s been there and judge based upon erosion or accretion?

You have to know the beach in order for any data you get to be meaningful.  

 

The drift runs NE to SW.  You have to know how the wind will impact that on the beaches you fish (e.g., an east wind will affect South Shore Long Island differently than it will central New Jersey).  One you know that, you'll have an idea how the current will be running along the beach, what you'll need to do to deal with it, whether there's likely to be bait moving or just too much weed, etc.

 

Basically, you need to be at the beach first to establish a baseline.  Once you have one, you can use the data you pull up at home to predict how the current at the beaches you fish will be affected.

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19 hours ago, WannaBe1982 said:

Hey guys, I’m just a wanna be who puts a rod in his hand. I’ve been trying to learn as much as I can from the old timers and friends around. This site has been a very useful resource for googans like me. 
 

With that out of the way: does anyone know how to determine the speed of the current before planning a trip? Or is it one of those things you find out once you drop your line? 
 

Thanks for your help (and make the cheap shots funny at least). 

I use deepzoom and it will give you a rough idea about the flow.

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Posted (edited) · Report post

There’s an App for that! LOL!!!

 

Navionics Boating app on the phone…

 

Arrows depict general current direction. “Engage” the current arrow and it shows time and speed…

 

Not all areas are covered in detail but it gives a very good idea on what’s going on…

 

E1E8D0DC-D55A-45ED-AD07-922074664435.jpeg

1C916C2D-F579-42F6-9731-5BC601807D28.jpeg

Edited by Inshore

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2 hours ago, WannaBe1982 said:

How would you consider the littoral drift without being at the beach? From the structure that’s been there and judge based upon erosion or accretion?

You are on the right track. For example in Saco Bay, Maine the long shore current runs north and deposits sand from the Saco River at Pine Point. You can verify this by looking at Googlemaps and see the evidence of the sandbar. There’s a lot of papers about this problem as Camp Ellis (mouth of the Saco) suffers from erosion. If there was an area you were interested in local to you I’d be looking for papers on the subject, erosion, jetty placement etc. 

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I agree 

Eldridge 

Deepzoom.com 

Navionics 

NOAA current tables w/ local corrections 

 

To predict, establish baseline, and compare 

Verified and fine tuned with local observation and experience judging effects of wind / local environmentals 

 

 

 

 

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What I would keep in mind is no resource will be as accurate as your own observations. To me a visible rip line on the surface is like an iceberg, you only see a small portion and what's underneath may not be the same as what is seen. Specifically I view the rip as three dimensional with water direction of travel changes and water temperature inconsistencies and fluctuations which are often unmentioned. The rip line is just the card that can be seen.

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14 hours ago, Inshore said:

There’s an App for that! LOL!!!

 

Navionics Boating app on the phone…

 

Arrows depict general current direction. “Engage” the current arrow and it shows time and speed…

 

Not all areas are covered in detail but it gives a very good idea on what’s going on…

 

E1E8D0DC-D55A-45ED-AD07-922074664435.jpeg

1C916C2D-F579-42F6-9731-5BC601807D28.jpeg

That’s genius! 

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26 mins ago, SC said:

What I would keep in mind is no resource will be as accurate as your own observations. To me a visible rip line on the surface is like an iceberg, you only see a small portion and what's underneath may not be the same as what is seen. Specifically I view the rip as three dimensional with water direction of travel changes and water temperature inconsistencies and fluctuations which are often unmentioned. The rip line is just the card that can be seen.

I agree that the best way to gain knowledge is first hand and scouting locations in person during slack tides but I was basically looking for a way to gauge the current so that I’ll be able to anticipate what kind of weight I need when I’m out fishing. That’s really what I meant by “planning” for a trip.

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