Reed422

How to Avoid Getting Cut Off

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I have developed a method over the years that has worked successfully the vast majority of the time. My only lament is that I wished I figured it out a decade or so earlier, I believe the reason it took me so long is because I find the method was not an intuitive progression of methods to try but better late than never.

 

I previously tried what I assume most others have tried such as releasing the line from the spool and hoping the fish clears the obstruction on it's own, changing my position so the line of pull angle has been changed, loosening the drag, holding the rod high up hoping to clear the boulder, etc. Occasionally, very occasionally, one of these methods did work but most of the time I invested additional time which directly reduces future opportunities and the end result was I'd usually lose the fish along with whatever was used to hook it in the first place.

 

The most common issue was I'd hook a nice fish which would hang me around an unseen boulder up-current to my position. This is in my opinion the toughest  situation I'd have to think my way out of. Any pressure put on the fish will result in a see-sawing effect of the line against the boulder and almost always result in a lost fish and plug. The reason, in my opinion, is the rod, thru bending and flexing, will very significantly increase the "sawing" effect of the line against the boulder. Exactly what I was trying to avoid in the first place.

 

This method definitely worked very well for me. Eventually I discovered it when trying to "break off" a fish I felt I was wasting my time with and just wanted to get my line back in the water asap as I could potentially catch several more in the time I was wasting trying to land the one snagged fish. First I realized the fish is close to dead, sure you can feel an occasional head-shake muted because of the line wrapped around the boulder but that fish isn't making any runs it is just weakening in strength and becoming literally dead weight.

 

What I did was lock my drag and cup the spool in my hand to all but eliminate any more line coming off the spool. Point the rod tip at the fish and place the reel underwater. Slowly and steadily pull straight back in a direct line of pull. I held the reel underwater so if the plug was to tear free from the fish it would not be flying towards my face. Eventually I'd be able to feel the swivel of my leader against the rock. The fish is now only 30 inches or so from being clear of the boulder. Now it's just a matter of time until the fish moves to the "right" side of the boulder, either on it's own or because of any help from current, wind or wave action. I found this exact moment extremely obvious and as soon as I felt the swivel clear the boulder I'd raise the rod tip to normal position and quickly reel in  the almost dead fish and change spools before making another cast. I found this method worked for ME 95% of the time while all previously tried methods combined worked for ME probably only 5% of the time. 

 

 

 

 

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38 mins ago, SC said:

I have developed a method over the years that has worked successfully the vast majority of the time. My only lament is that I wished I figured it out a decade or so earlier, I believe the reason it took me so long is because I find the method was not an intuitive progression of methods to try but better late than never.

 

I previously tried what I assume most others have tried such as releasing the line from the spool and hoping the fish clears the obstruction on it's own, changing my position so the line of pull angle has been changed, loosening the drag, holding the rod high up hoping to clear the boulder, etc. Occasionally, very occasionally, one of these methods did work but most of the time I invested additional time which directly reduces future opportunities and the end result was I'd usually lose the fish along with whatever was used to hook it in the first place.

 

The most common issue was I'd hook a nice fish which would hang me around an unseen boulder up-current to my position. This is in my opinion the toughest  situation I'd have to think my way out of. Any pressure put on the fish will result in a see-sawing effect of the line against the boulder and almost always result in a lost fish and plug. The reason, in my opinion, is the rod, thru bending and flexing, will very significantly increase the "sawing" effect of the line against the boulder. Exactly what I was trying to avoid in the first place.

 

This method definitely worked very well for me. Eventually I discovered it when trying to "break off" a fish I felt I was wasting my time with and just wanted to get my line back in the water asap as I could potentially catch several more in the time I was wasting trying to land the one snagged fish. First I realized the fish is close to dead, sure you can feel an occasional head-shake muted because of the line wrapped around the boulder but that fish isn't making any runs it is just weakening in strength and becoming literally dead weight.

 

What I did was lock my drag and cup the spool in my hand to all but eliminate any more line coming off the spool. Point the rod tip at the fish and place the reel underwater. Slowly and steadily pull straight back in a direct line of pull. I held the reel underwater so if the plug was to tear free from the fish it would not be flying towards my face. Eventually I'd be able to feel the swivel of my leader against the rock. The fish is now only 30 inches or so from being clear of the boulder. Now it's just a matter of time until the fish moves to the "right" side of the boulder, either on it's own or because of any help from current, wind or wave action. I found this exact moment extremely obvious and as soon as I felt the swivel clear the boulder I'd raise the rod tip to normal position and quickly reel in  the almost dead fish and change spools before making another cast. I found this method worked for ME 95% of the time while all previously tried methods combined worked for ME probably only 5% of the time. 

 

 

 

 

That does sound interesting but for me to get that close to the water would be certain death. 
 

I did loosen the drag considerably but I guess it just wasn’t my day.

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1 hour ago, SC said:

I have developed a method over the years that has worked successfully the vast majority of the time. My only lament is that I wished I figured it out a decade or so earlier, I believe the reason it took me so long is because I find the method was not an intuitive progression of methods to try but better late than never.

 

I previously tried what I assume most others have tried such as releasing the line from the spool and hoping the fish clears the obstruction on it's own, changing my position so the line of pull angle has been changed, loosening the drag, holding the rod high up hoping to clear the boulder, etc. Occasionally, very occasionally, one of these methods did work but most of the time I invested additional time which directly reduces future opportunities and the end result was I'd usually lose the fish along with whatever was used to hook it in the first place.

 

The most common issue was I'd hook a nice fish which would hang me around an unseen boulder up-current to my position. This is in my opinion the toughest  situation I'd have to think my way out of. Any pressure put on the fish will result in a see-sawing effect of the line against the boulder and almost always result in a lost fish and plug. The reason, in my opinion, is the rod, thru bending and flexing, will very significantly increase the "sawing" effect of the line against the boulder. Exactly what I was trying to avoid in the first place.

 

This method definitely worked very well for me. Eventually I discovered it when trying to "break off" a fish I felt I was wasting my time with and just wanted to get my line back in the water asap as I could potentially catch several more in the time I was wasting trying to land the one snagged fish. First I realized the fish is close to dead, sure you can feel an occasional head-shake muted because of the line wrapped around the boulder but that fish isn't making any runs it is just weakening in strength and becoming literally dead weight.

 

What I did was lock my drag and cup the spool in my hand to all but eliminate any more line coming off the spool. Point the rod tip at the fish and place the reel underwater. Slowly and steadily pull straight back in a direct line of pull. I held the reel underwater so if the plug was to tear free from the fish it would not be flying towards my face. Eventually I'd be able to feel the swivel of my leader against the rock. The fish is now only 30 inches or so from being clear of the boulder. Now it's just a matter of time until the fish moves to the "right" side of the boulder, either on it's own or because of any help from current, wind or wave action. I found this exact moment extremely obvious and as soon as I felt the swivel clear the boulder I'd raise the rod tip to normal position and quickly reel in  the almost dead fish and change spools before making another cast. I found this method worked for ME 95% of the time while all previously tried methods combined worked for ME probably only 5% of the time. 

 

 

 

 

Steve that’s an different approach and sounds like it was very successful. I do believe you fished exclusively mono , which is important to note . Today’s braided lines don’t have the abrasion resistance of our old school mono. Just want to confirm for those looking to try this. 

Edited by giant basshole

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1 hour ago, giant basshole said:

Steve that’s an different approach and sounds like it was very successful. I do believe you fished exclusively mono , which is important to note . Today’s braided lines don’t have the abrasion resistance of our old school mono. Just want to confirm for those looking to try this. 

I did not fish "modern" braids but did fish with Nylon Squidding Line, Dacron and Micron braids. I did fish Micron on Block early on (conventional) but felt it was not the best tool to use because of the overall reduced abrasion resistance and high-cost replacement. The method, again in my opinion, has more to do with the line, any line, not being "sawed" back and forth as I felt was the result of the rod flexing during the attempt to retrieve the fish (like a bow saw). When pulling on an upward or sideways angle line contact with the rock is also at an increased angle. My reasoning is the line will contact the rock at a less severe angle meaning more of the line diameter will contact the sharp edge requiring more contact over a wider area before failure Trying to use the rod as a "lever" only increases friction and minimizes the section of line where the damage will occur while increasing the sawing effect as the rod is "loaded" under stress.. I found I'd rather have less damage to a larger section of line than more damage concentrated on a smaller section of line as the weakest link of the chain will always fail first.

Edited by SC

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No way around it. It happens. Fish shakes or lunges hard enough, snap. My method is to not give the fish a chance to turn its head no matter what. Keep pumping that rod back. Big fish get tired quickly. Make it spend all its energy trying to turn its head for a run. 

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25 mins ago, LockedDrag said:

No way around it. It happens. Fish shakes or lunges hard enough, snap. My method is to not give the fish a chance to turn its head no matter what. Keep pumping that rod back. Big fish get tired quickly. Make it spend all its energy trying to turn its head for a run. 

This. I’ve fished 30 years in a boulder field in less then 10’ feet of water. Car sized boulders and thousands of them everywhere over the entire bottom that have ripped wide open the hulls of many boats. Its inevitable your line is going to contact a Boulder on almost every fish.  If you let them pull a lot of drag your not going to get them in the boat. I direct the fish where I want them to go not the other way around. I keep a tight drag and solid pressure and, just like locked drag, I don’t let them turn their heads. I don’t get any thrills because a fish is pulling line on a loose drag. I check my line after every fish caught and if I feel the slightest Knick or something not right I’m changing it out before the next cast. 

Edited by poopdeck

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41 mins ago, SC said:

I did not fish "modern" braids but did fish with Nylon Squidding Line, Dacron and Micron braids. I did fish Micron on Block early on (conventional) but felt it was not the best tool to use because of the overall reduced abrasion resistance and high-cost replacement. The method, again in my opinion, has more to do with the line, any line, not being "sawed" back and forth as I felt was the result of the rod flexing during the attempt to retrieve the fish (like a bow saw). When pulling on an upward or sideways angle line contact with the rock is also at an increased angle. My reasoning is the line will contact the rock at a less severe angle meaning more of the line diameter will contact the sharp edge requiring more contact over a wider area before failure Trying to use the rod as a "lever" only increases friction and minimizes the section of line where the damage will occur while increasing the sawing effect as the rod is "loaded" under stress.. I found I'd rather have less damage to a larger section of line than more damage concentrated on a smaller section of lineas the weakest link of the chain will always fail first.

Understood and some thing I’m definitely going to try. Thanks for confirming and further explanation.

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1 hour ago, giant basshole said:

Steve that’s an different approach and sounds like it was very successful. I do believe you fished exclusively mono , which is important to note . Today’s braided lines don’t have the abrasion resistance of our old school mono. Just want to confirm for those looking to try this. 

I do the same as Plan B with modern braid. First, change the angle if you think you know how the line got caught, second, let the fish run, and hope the slack line lifts out, finally, reel in until the swivel jams, and hope the fish shakes you out. Nothing is 100% though.

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I never gave it much thought but this morning the fact that fish no doubt whatsoever instinctively run for cover not only when being chased but when mouth hooked as your targeted quarry OR as your unlucky live bait. I hooked and fought a season high number of Bass this morning (not counting the early season outings banging schoolies like snappers) I landed 4 beautiful fish. Lost 5 fish (1 got off the other 4 ran me off) but I lost a significant amount of terminal tackle. Thank god it was just snaggers, barrels, duo-lock snaps trebles and home made wire leaders rather than $20-$30 lures or older difficult to impossible to replace lures. I was keeping my live bunker pulled far enough out of the slips that they wouldn’t catch a piling or outdrive but a handful of them ran to the bottom looking for cover instead. My local boat ramp is 75 yards downstream from a waterfall that deposits heavy debris in heavy storms including the hundreds of large tree branches and whole small tree trunks that pile up in the basin in front of the ramp and don’t decompose quickly due to the low salinity of the water is my guess. So at least 3 or 4 rigs got donated  that way. 2 rigs became permanent decorations on a new Red can I wasn’t aware of. Apparently a lot of stupid boaters must head up there where they should never be in the first place so it appears that lack of intelligence and common sense required a tax payer expenditure and aggravation to fishermen. Amazing the lengths gone to in the interest of saving dimwits from themselves. Then of course, ultimately the 4 big fish that flew the middle finger in my direction as the zinged in the direction of the closest pilings lol. Normally that scenario immediately results in a whole lot of very loud vulgar language and steam from my ears which it did several times today (And it’s always the bigger fish you battle in an outing you lose that way because they’re the ones you can’t pull away from there) however when you land as many as you lose and the ones you end up putting eyes and hands on are also good size gorgeous fish it takes a whole lot of the fire back changing the rage to slight disappointment. And you feel like a warrior hero the next time you yank one back from running you off w just willpower lol!

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How about just cranking down the drag and not letting the fish run in there? Maybe gotta beef up the action on the rod and reel so it’s not under gunned while fishing at certain locations? 

 

So I usually have a shock leader on my line- it’s about double to triple the rod length of about 40# mono tied to your main line. Then your regular leader added to that. If you use braid- an FG knot works well. I guess if your spin fishing this could also help with the cut finger tip on your casting finger? I don’t really spin fish- so idk and I also use mono all the way too... but the shock leader is really helpful and adds a lot of abrasion resistance. If you have a 10’ rod- it’s about 22- 25 ft of 40# mono. The FG knot is hardly noticeable through the guides. If your using mono to mono use an Albright or something like that 

 

Also some great suggestions above too- havnt heard of the one from @SC before- very good stuff! Thanks for sharing 

Edited by Mr.Belmar

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