Mike

Tankless Baseboard Heat

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Anyone doing this? I'm looking at replacing the furnace running my baseboards. 5 zones over 4000 sqft. Basement zone just sits at 60F all winter. Using upstairs zones at night, downstairs zones for daytime.

 

TIA. Any advice would be appreciated.

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Posted (edited) · Report post

so you have a oil fired furnace heating your hydronic baseboards ?

 

 

1) unless you live somewhere with ridiculously low electricity rates, the cost would likely be ridiculously high. 2) fin-tube baseboard is a "high temp" form of heating. Most tankless  come preset to 120 or 140. Chances are unless you have a very tight building envelope, you would not satisfy your heat requirement.

 

hotwater baseboard heat from tankless water heater - DoItYourself.com Community Forums

Edited by coolhandfluke

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55 mins ago, coolhandfluke said:

so you have a oil fired furnace heating your hydronic baseboards ?

 

 

1) unless you live somewhere with ridiculously low electricity rates, the cost would likely be ridiculously high. 2) fin-tube baseboard is a "high temp" form of heating. Most tankless  come preset to 120 or 140. Chances are unless you have a very tight building envelope, you would not satisfy your heat requirement.

 

hotwater baseboard heat from tankless water heater - DoItYourself.com Community Forums

Being in the supply business I was hopeful your advice would not be 14 hrs old. Has the tech not moved forward enough to run baseboard heat with a tankless heater?

 

 

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Posted (edited) · Report post

lol.    i sell the hydronic heaters, but not the tanks which is why i googled it.     

 

found this one.

 

Top-selling tankless brand Rinnai added velocity to the trend this year when it introduced a dedicated hydronic air handler that uses the manufacturer’s tankless water heaters and boilers as a heat source. The units can meet heating capacities ranging from 17,000 to 77,000 Btus, allowing them to serve as effective alternatives to propane or gas furnaces or electric backup heat, says Rahul Goyal, product director for the HVAC category at Rinnai.

Compared with a gas furnace, tankless hydronic heating requires only one gas appliance, meaning fewer vents and gas connections to install, he says. It also allows a home to leverage the thermal efficiency of a tankless water heater, which can achieve efficiency levels around 94 percent. And while homeowners typically love the hot air temperature provided by a furnace, a hydronic air handler provides a less-extreme heat to help avoid stratification, in which the air close to a duct is much warmer than space farther away   august 2020

Edited by coolhandfluke

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I think most mechanics will steer you to the more traditional W&M boiler. If it breaks, they can get it back up and running quick.   If space is an issue and venting can be done relatively easy then tankless is something to seriously consider.  That's just my 02.

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15 mins ago, coolhandfluke said:

lol.    i sell the hydronic heaters, but not the tanks which is why i googled it.     

 

found this one.

 

Top-selling tankless brand Rinnai added velocity to the trend this year when it introduced a dedicated hydronic air handler that uses the manufacturer’s tankless water heaters and boilers as a heat source. The units can meet heating capacities ranging from 17,000 to 77,000 Btus, allowing them to serve as effective alternatives to propane or gas furnaces or electric backup heat, says Rahul Goyal, product director for the HVAC category at Rinnai.

Compared with a gas furnace, tankless hydronic heating requires only one gas appliance, meaning fewer vents and gas connections to install, he says. It also allows a home to leverage the thermal efficiency of a tankless water heater, which can achieve efficiency levels around 94 percent. And while homeowners typically love the hot air temperature provided by a furnace, a hydronic air handler provides a less-extreme heat to help avoid stratification, in which the air close to a duct is much warmer than space farther away   august 2020

That's something I can add to the AC air handler.  It is not for heating baseboards! LOL 

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8 mins ago, Fly By Nite said:

I think most mechanics will steer you to the more traditional W&M boiler. If it breaks, they can get it back up and running quick.   If space is an issue and venting can be done relatively easy then tankless is something to seriously consider.  That's just my 02.

Just looking at efficient options. I'm surprised that tankless hasn't become popular for baseboards. I thought that by now condensing HE units with on demand hot water, a pump and some Taco zone controllers would be common.

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Could be lots of reasons why people don't consider it. Venting, electric, and gas requirements make it more expensive retrofit. Then if something breaks how long will you be without service? Totally makes sense why a plumber is going to steer you to just replacing the boiler. If i were building a small beach home for seasonal usage then the answer is much clearer.

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Looking around, I see that Navien is promoting their NFC - H and NBC - H combi units for whole house heat. They even come with 3 zone control. But I have 5 and two units would drive the cost up too much.

 

Now I just have to find someone with experience doing it. I'd hate to rely on me to figure this out.

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36 mins ago, Fly By Nite said:

Then if something breaks how long will you be without service

 

I have seen this cited as an issue. Standard boilers are easier to fix quickly.

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3 hours ago, Mike said:

Anyone doing this? I'm looking at replacing the furnace running my baseboards. 5 zones over 4000 sqft. Basement zone just sits at 60F all winter. Using upstairs zones at night, downstairs zones for daytime.

 

TIA. Any advice would be appreciated.

My parents just did this upgrade. They got rid of the old oil furnace and switched to propane with a tankless to feed the hot water heating loops. 

 

New system looks great and compact. Only sticking point on the install was my dad wanted to use a Bosch unit but all the local guys only installed/serviced other brands. They would install if he insisted but then could not guarantee quick response if repairs needed. Make sure you have someone local who sticks parts for whatever you install. 

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1 hour ago, Mike said:

Surprised he would insist. I would prefer a unit the HVAC guys are familiar with.

He ended up going with the brand that they normally install and service, for that reason. My point was that if he was really insistent, they would have installed whatever he wanted, but then there would be no guarantee on future service in a timely manner.
 

In his original research he wanted to go with a better unit, but did not want to be stuck with maintenance and service headaches down the road.

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