bassmaster

Lighting

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had a parker 23 se cc get hit while on a ball in 2009.  cooked the plastic off every single wire on the boat and the guts of every piece of electronics.  can’t believe the whole boat didn’t burn.  batteries were in the console and i think it hit that (no t top and melted/charred windscreen).  insurance was cool and paid for same if available or better installed.

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23 mins ago, bassmaster said:

Wholy crap 

Forgot to unhook antennas,  hope i dont get hit.  New yaesu rig to

 

Yup, me too. I'm on the canal now and being treated to a show.  I forgot my foil hat at home.  I'm really fraidy scared. :scared:

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11 hours ago, bassmaster said:

Wholy crap 

Forgot to unhook antennas,  hope i dont get hit.  New yaesu rig to

 

Just remember that graphite rod you are using is what we call a Jesus stick during a lightening storm . If lightening hits it you may well be on your way to paradise. I have fished in many lightening storms, during another time, where the lightening would dance across the water I was standing in and the only thing that saved me was that i was inside my waders. I also just had glass rods at the time . Nothing is more beautiful that fishing in the snow or during a lightening storm to me . Peace and Prayers

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1 hour ago, Angler #1 said:

Just remember that graphite rod you are using is what we call a Jesus stick during a lightening storm . If lightening hits it you may well be on your way to paradise. I have fished in many lightening storms, during another time, where the lightening would dance across the water I was standing in and the only thing that saved me was that i was inside my waders. I also just had glass rods at the time . Nothing is more beautiful that fishing in the snow or during a lightening storm to me . Peace and Prayers

Im allset with that. I like my life

A wet rod waiders aint saving you

 

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57 mins ago, Angler #1 said:

...........lightening would dance across the water I was standing in and the only thing that saved me was that i was inside my waders......

 

Carl, had you made direct bodily contact with the water you would have been a goner for sure.

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45 mins ago, Joe G said:

 

Carl, had you made direct bodily contact with the water you would have been a goner for sure.

Joe I was in the water as the lightening danced across the water from where it can down a few feet away. One of my nine lives  Peace and Prayers

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7 hours ago, Angler #1 said:

Just remember that graphite rod you are using is what we call a Jesus stick during a lightening storm . If lightening hits it you may well be on your way to paradise. I have fished in many lightening storms, during another time, where the lightening would dance across the water I was standing in and the only thing that saved me was that i was inside my waders. I also just had glass rods at the time . Nothing is more beautiful that fishing in the snow or during a lightening storm to me . Peace and Prayers

Not something you want to play with, that lightin' stuff can kill you dead. We (many) have all done reckless things that could have killed us but were able to cheat death. As you get older, you learn not to challenge the chances quite as often. Seems Carl still has fishing in a lightning storm in waders on his to do list, the first rumble has me headed to the parking lot. 

 

I used to think Carl was smart, perhaps he is, but he's a slow learner.

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I once looked up what attracts lightning and it doesn’t seem to need an object made out of an electrical conductor. It’s static electricity and is attracted to long pointy objects. It runs over the surface of an object so a glass fishing rod is just as dangerous as a graphite one. 

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1 hour ago, Highlander1 said:

Not something you want to play with, that lightin' stuff can kill you dead. We (many) have all done reckless things that could have killed us but were able to cheat death. As you get older, you learn not to challenge the chances quite as often. Seems Carl still has fishing in a lightning storm in waders on his to do list, the first rumble has me headed to the parking lot. 

 

I used to think Carl was smart, perhaps he is, but he's a slow learner.

Highlander back in the early days of fishing I found a personal joy in being able to fish in any type of weather conditions no matter what it was. it was never about learning about the dangers, that I already was well versed on so that I could relate those experiences to others what not to do. I found fishing during the winter months in minus 30 degree weather without wind chill factors the most challenging. Especially when it was snowing out . I was prepared to combat the elements in each and every such event and found that the fish do not really care if it is raining, snowing or the wind was blowing with minus 30 degree weather conditions. Keep in mind during my early experiences I was caught expectantly out on the flats of Boston Harbor , Quincy having walked out as far as I could in waders with no lighting strikes in the area or even rain for that matter. My experiences did not need to be repeated to learn any safety lessons , however I always challenged myself to fight the elements which I did . Being smart about was not in the cards during these times. it was all about the experience and being able to recall it to warn others about the dangers.  Peace and Prayers   

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I was nailed (direct shot to the testicle) at Monster's Of Rock '88 in Maine after being pressed up against the wall during the Scorpions and forced at a joint steel abutment. 

I immediately jump back two rows. 
 

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1 hour ago, Angler #1 said:

Highlander back in the early days of fishing I found a personal joy in being able to fish in any type of weather conditions no matter what it was. it was never about learning about the dangers, that I already was well versed on so that I could relate those experiences to others what not to do. I found fishing during the winter months in minus 30 degree weather without wind chill factors the most challenging. Especially when it was snowing out . I was prepared to combat the elements in each and every such event and found that the fish do not really care if it is raining, snowing or the wind was blowing with minus 30 degree weather conditions. Keep in mind during my early experiences I was caught expectantly out on the flats of Boston Harbor , Quincy having walked out as far as I could in waders with no lighting strikes in the area or even rain for that matter. My experiences did not need to be repeated to learn any safety lessons , however I always challenged myself to fight the elements which I did . Being smart about was not in the cards during these times. it was all about the experience and being able to recall it to warn others about the dangers.  Peace and Prayers   

I should have mentioned, we are glad your here many years after facing those conditions, I can understand that fishing when its snowing is enjoyable, but not so much fun in lightning. Took it as the next big t-storm Angler#1 is headed for the beach for some fun. 

 

I do enjoy a good t-storm from my garage with the door open, but I stay away from beaches, fields and golf courses. Should also shy away from trees, they get it , you get it.  Stay in the car or in the house and hope.

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