ezmagun

Flies for swinging in the current

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On 9/4/2021 at 1:42 AM, ezmagun said:

add action as they go through their full swing.

Ive been thinking about this a lot.  Love my flatwings and the way they dance flowing along with the current and proper mends, but they don’t swim on a tight line against the current. 


In my experience flies that have bulk in the head, and/or hollow style bulk that creates a empty pocket behind tapered materials, have a lot more swim on a tight line swing in faster current.  Flatwings with deer hair heads or hollow fleye style bodies have the best compromise I’ve found for movement across the full swing.

 

But really look forward to learning more about other platforms this fall, especially for bigger profiles.  Tied and tested a bunch of kinky muddlers over the weekend and loved them.  The middle one with a hollow sparse squimpish tail and pointy head really went nuts, bobbing and weaving against the current.


EE824ED8-DA0E-40CF-9446-60562FC87384.png.7887d69fca9e2feafca05bdd56f783f9.png

 

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On 9/4/2021 at 1:42 AM, ezmagun said:

What are some of your favorite fly patterns for swinging in current for striped bass from shore? I am looking for patterns that will ungulate on their own and add action as they go through their full swing.

A fly that will ungulate is difficult, since I know of no pattern that adds hooves to a fly. Nor do I know of any baitfish with hooves. From Wikipedia:

 

"

Ungulates (pronounced /ˈʌŋɡjəlts/ UNG-gyə-layts) are members of the diverse clade Ungulata which primarily consists of large mammals with hooves. These include odd-toed ungulates such as horses, rhinoceroses, and tapirs; and even-toed ungulates such as cattle, pigs, giraffes, camels, sheep, deer, and hippopotamuses. Cetaceans such as whales, dolphins, and porpoises are also classified as even-toed ungulates, although they do not have hooves. Most terrestrial ungulates use the hoofed tips of their toes to support their body weight while standing or moving.

The term means, roughly, "being hoofed" or "hoofed animal". As a descriptive term, "ungulate" normally excludes cetaceans as they do not possess most of the typical morphological characteristics of other ungulates, but recent discoveries indicate that they were also descended from early artiodactyls.[2] Ungulates are typically herbivorous and many employ specialized gut bacteria to allow them to digest cellulose. Some modern species, such as pigs, are omnivorous, while some prehistoric species, such as mesonychians, were carnivorous."

 

However, if you meant "undulate," any of the preceding patterns will be fine. 

 

;) ;) ;)

 

 

 

 

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7 hours ago, BrianBM said:

A fly that will ungulate is difficult, since I know of no pattern that adds hooves to a fly. Nor do I know of any baitfish with hooves. From Wikipedia:

 

"

Ungulates (pronounced /ˈʌŋɡjəlts/ UNG-gyə-layts) are members of the diverse clade Ungulata which primarily consists of large mammals with hooves. These include odd-toed ungulates such as horses, rhinoceroses, and tapirs; and even-toed ungulates such as cattle, pigs, giraffes, camels, sheep, deer, and hippopotamuses. Cetaceans such as whales, dolphins, and porpoises are also classified as even-toed ungulates, although they do not have hooves. Most terrestrial ungulates use the hoofed tips of their toes to support their body weight while standing or moving.

The term means, roughly, "being hoofed" or "hoofed animal". As a descriptive term, "ungulate" normally excludes cetaceans as they do not possess most of the typical morphological characteristics of other ungulates, but recent discoveries indicate that they were also descended from early artiodactyls.[2] Ungulates are typically herbivorous and many employ specialized gut bacteria to allow them to digest cellulose. Some modern species, such as pigs, are omnivorous, while some prehistoric species, such as mesonychians, were carnivorous."

 

However, if you meant "undulate," any of the preceding patterns will be fine. 

 

;) ;) ;)

 

Now you have me wondering if a magic head counts as a hoof if it supports a weight balanced porpoising soft hackle

Edited by Bait Tailer

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On 9/10/2021 at 3:47 PM, The Fisherman said:

Sorry for the late entry. I may be biased, but my soft-hackled flatwings have served me well on the swing. :-)

 

SofthackledFlatwings.JPG.08ced8f0e738bdb485d42efd809f5c25.JPG

 

Steve Culton 

Love those Steve- never thought of adding length flatwing style.

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On 9/10/2021 at 3:47 PM, The Fisherman said:

Sorry for the late entry. I may be biased, but my soft-hackled flatwings have served me well on the swing. :-)

 

SofthackledFlatwings.JPG.08ced8f0e738bdb485d42efd809f5c25.JPG

 

Steve Culton 

How large have you tied these?  

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On 9/10/2021 at 3:47 PM, The Fisherman said:

Sorry for the late entry. I may be biased, but my soft-hackled flatwings have served me well on the swing. :-)

 

SofthackledFlatwings.JPG.08ced8f0e738bdb485d42efd809f5c25.JPG

 

Steve Culton 

Hi Steve,  those are beautiful,  what material are the collars made from?

 

Archie

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On 9/10/2021 at 3:47 PM, The Fisherman said:

Sorry for the late entry. I may be biased, but my soft-hackled flatwings have served me well on the swing. :-)

 

SofthackledFlatwings.JPG.08ced8f0e738bdb485d42efd809f5c25.JPG

 

Steve Culton 

Those look great. The mallard collars are tricky to get to sweep back just right. It took me awhile  to get the hang of it.

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Thanks everyone for the kind words. I love all the questions! Here are some answers.

 

I don't tie these very long -- for me the wheelhouse is 3 1/2 - 4". Of course, you could tie them longer if you like.

 

The collars are blood quill marabou, tied in at the tip. 3-5 wraps. One of them features an overlay of mallard flank. You could also use teal or wood duck or...whatever you like. You used to see a lot of steelhead streamers use the material for the same purpose. I don't know that it makes the pattern more effective, just...different. The stripers don't seem to mind it. :-)

 

Steve Culton

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