Sandflee

Natural Gas / LP Furnace

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I mention this before that i had a 120 Gallon LP tank delivered and filled for the house upstate, and the guy that did the install fired up the furnace and claims its set up for natural gas and needs to be converted, the manufacturer sticker inside say NG, now my FIL who was there said the flame was blue with some yellow, if it was indeed set up wrong would it be all yellow? I just cant see the previous owner (35 years in the house) would not have converted it considering how meticulous he was with everything else, Is there a way to tell visually before i call the previous owner and ask?

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6 hours ago, Sandflee said:

I mention this before that i had a 120 Gallon LP tank delivered and filled for the house upstate, and the guy that did the install fired up the furnace and claims its set up for natural gas and needs to be converted, the manufacturer sticker inside say NG, now my FIL who was there said the flame was blue with some yellow, if it was indeed set up wrong would it be all yellow? I just cant see the previous owner (35 years in the house) would not have converted it considering how meticulous he was with everything else, Is there a way to tell visually before i call the previous owner and ask?

I'd tend to trust the tank guy, but try asking on my goto site for this kind of stuff: heatinghelp. They know.

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8 hours ago, ted527 said:

No way to tell just by looking. Really need gas pressure gauge and combustion analyzer to set up.

so theoretically there is no way the tank guy could tell

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19 mins ago, cheech said:

Call the company that was suppling fuel and look at the past history.

They previous owner only had a 30lb tank hooked up guessing he didn't use it often, he used this as the main source of heat, which he said heats the whole house

IMG_0130.jpg

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So i spoke with the previous owner and he said the furnace was switched over to work with LP, however this is the flame I get, that is with the primary air on the ribbon fully open

 

IMG_0902.jpg

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LP orifice is smaller than NG, usually LP hole is usually the size of a period in a sentence. NG hole is like a sharpie, not twice the size but noticeably larger. As has been stated, you'd need equipment to verify, my method just keeps you from blowing things up or down.

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Posted (edited) · Report post

1 min ago, Highlander1 said:

LP orifice is smaller than NG, usually LP hole is usually the size of a period in a sentence. NG hole is like a sharpie, not twice the size but noticeably larger. As has been stated, you'd need equipment to verify, my method just keeps you from blowing things up or down.

Cant get the parts anyway, would need a new furnace

for now i'll just utilize the wood stove and the blower on the furnace to circulate the stove heat if needed

Edited by Sandflee

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3 mins ago, Highlander1 said:

If its set up for LP and your using NG you don't need parts, just enlarge (drill) the orifice opening and your good to go.

We are using LP

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8 hours ago, Sandflee said:

So i spoke with the previous owner and he said the furnace was switched over to work with LP, however this is the flame I get, that is with the primary air on the ribbon fully open

 

IMG_0902.jpg

Very sooty looking flame. Furnace is probably caked with soot up in heat exchanger passages. Carbon Monoxide is through the roof high. Please don’t use it.

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Posted (edited) · Report post

So a couple of thoughts, unless the original conversion was either not done correctly or not done at all, it seems like this shouldn't require you to change out the jets.  I don't know enough about furnaces, but usually when a flame is burning to rich, it means it's not getting enough air. I've had it happen on my stove when the burner head still had water in it after cleaning and had it happen this year my grill - rust on the cast iron burners and spider webs/eggs in the side burner head.  I'd get a pro in to do some maintenance before I'd jump to the conclusion that the jets  are wrong.

 

PS-  though I wouldn't recommend it, when I was a kid my dad's buddies modified the jets when they put a used gas stove into their deer camp kitchen.  Dad worked with some pretty skilled machinists and maintenance guys at a pharma plant. They filled the brass NG jets with solder and then used a pin vise to drill smaller holes- first time I ever saw a pin vice

Edited by rathrbefishn

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