DeepBlue85

Doing things right

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13 posts in this topic

GREAT sentiment.  I live it.  

 

... something to consider.  What if others feel that your admission and efforts are not enough.  What if they deem your 'sacrifice" not enough by a long shot.

 

How much will you consider their opinion?

 

There are a great many who would love to have all rec fishing banned.  (hunting as well).   Be sure you dont give them too much voice.

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Well said Db85. I try to do the right thing. But still can not understand why there are so many people that still do not pick up their trash. #leaveitbetterthanyoufoundit 

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They closed drive on beach on the top of the DE bay. Reason is because of the :manpig:pigs and drunk party people. Loads of trash left behind by the garbage :manpig:pigs. Trash, bottles, left behind by the party:manpig: pigs. Beach torn up by idiot :manpig:pigs with the idiot's driving all over the beach, racing, donuts, you name it. This is what the left who want to stop rec fishing feed off of. There scum. I'm sorry for being brunt, but why should game law abiding sportsman suffer for this recless scum.:beatin:

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I’m in total agreement. Well stated DeepBlue85. The best we can do is model ethical actions to those who haven’t learned better and voice our opinion when we see something wrong.

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12 hours ago, DeepBlue85 said:

I'm not a commercial fisherman, nothing about why I fish has ever influenced the way I fish.  I have, over the course of my adult life considered the impact my love for fishing has on fish and the surrounding environment.  Understanding that the reality of something I enjoy doing also causes obvious damage to the well being of my persuit, motivates me to be as responsible on the water as I can be.   Realizing I'll never stop fishing in some capacity, the concept that we as fishermen who love what we do, all-while doing an injustice to the fish and places we love, drove me to find a greater purpose in continuing the craft that is true angling.  

There's value in preserving the concept of fishing because it calls to the child in us all and plants the seed for a love sufficient to reflect upon and preserve it, lest we forgive the importance of our natural spaces all together.   The solution for me is to fish while doing the least amount of collateral damage to anything we encounter while on the water.  Sensitive marsh-land, barbless hooks, picking up your trash at the beach (or someone else's)  and doing the overall least damage while we pillage the things we love, fish included.  If everyone found the capacity to fish (or live) in this way, I suspect the world and our waters would be a vastly more wonderful place.  

 

Tight lines and give a dam.

That pretty well describes why I got involved in the fishery management process.  I always say that I did it out of self defense, because if folks who believe in responsible stewardship don't show up, the field will be dominated by the folks who will bring everything down.

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Great post. It’s so important to realize that fishing has quite the impact on the environment. Which is why it’s also important to not only lessen your own impact, but to “pay it back” by picking up trash, advocating for sustainable fisheries management, getting involved with habitat restoration projects, etc. Unfortunately, with a few exceptions, it’s rare to see the behavior that puts fisherman in a good light on social media.

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Posted (edited) · Report post

I also think there's a fear by some entities that depend on or represent the sport in discussing the subject of all fiishing's impact as a whole.  Understandably so, it's bad for business to suggest what your doing is some how detrimental to the actual quarry.  I feel that adopting a conservation perspective is an evolved and necesary modern adaptation that would benefit those entities by speaking on behalf and in the same way.   Weather it's a magazine publication regularly discussing the issues.... a tackle shop, charter or other fishing services, I feel the spectrum of this sport has broadened enough and for the right reasons that most participants want to understand the state of fisheries and the environment they utilize while still experiencing what the environment has to offer. 

More people fishing and bigger conservation issues have become understood and i feel it serves everyone to adopt the realities of the persuit as part of how anyone who  values its future, might continue to fish or do business. I'm glad so many share the sentiment here... our individual goals should all strive for stewardship of our waterways in the hope that real benefit an change are the result for everyone's fisheries and our lands.

Edited by DeepBlue85

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I fought in late 70's in Islamorada Fl. to stop killing and spiking tarpon, permit and bonefish , by guides there. Finally action was taken, Fought fishy derbies in NY ,(Lake Ontario ) for killing over 1000 salmon a day for 3 days to weigh them, Stop snagging on the NY tribs, (never going to stop). And now watch the stripers getting depleted by various ways. Kind'a like " Don Quixote ", Consider the time spent better than naught 

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13 hours ago, DeepBlue85 said:

I also think there's a fear by some entities that depend on or represent the sport in discussing the subject of all fiishing's impact as a whole.  Understandably so, it's bad for business to suggest what your doing is some how detrimental to the actual quarry.  I feel that adopting a conservation perspective is an evolved and necesary modern adaptation that would benefit those entities by speaking on behalf and in the same way.   Weather it's a magazine publication regularly discussing the issues.... a tackle shop, charter or other fishing services, I feel the spectrum of this sport has broadened enough and for the right reasons that most participants want to understand the state of fisheries and the environment they utilize while still experiencing what the environment has to offer. 

More people fishing and bigger conservation issues have become understood and i feel it serves everyone to adopt the realities of the persuit as part of how anyone who  values its future, might continue to fish or do business. I'm glad so many share the sentiment here... our individual goals should all strive for stewardship of our waterways in the hope that real benefit an change are the result for everyone's fisheries and our lands.

Generally, fishing publications and their advertisers range from slightly to aggressively hostile to conservation and science-based fisheries management, believing that the resulting regulations hurt short-term profits.  A few years ago I lost a column that I wrote for a regional magazine because I was active in conservation efforts, even though I kept those efforts separate from the column.  But I (and alnother writer at the same publication) lost my column because I had offended the industry.

 

Instead, we see the industry trying to undermine effective fishery management with things such as the Modern Fish Act, which in its original version would have changed federal recreational fishery management to resemble the ASMFC process (yes, thety actually did hold out striped bass as an example of a properly managed recreational fishery), eliminating annual catch limits, accountability, etc.  We currently see the industry pushing hard for :"recreational reform," which would also end ACLs and accountability, at the Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council.

 

Because the industry represents just about all of the advertising dollars received by fishing publications, you will rarely see any pro-conservation materials printed in the angling media (except for publications catering to fly fishermen, which understand that abundance is good for business), and will often see very virulent, aggressively anti-management editorials trying to turn anglers away from conservation advocacy,.

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