Capefox

Avet G2 MXL 5.8 MC Conventional Reel Review

Rate this topic

7 posts in this topic

Posted (edited) · Report post

Those who've seen my posts over the years know I'm a conventional reel nerd. A few months ago, the Avet MXL MC was recommended to me so I purchased one locally (California) for $270. This reel has quickly impressed me in many ways! 

 

Capacity (5/5). I was comfortably able to spool the Gen 2 MXL 5.8 MC with 500 yards of 50 lb braid versus 350 on my Avet 757 and 280 on my 15-series Squall/Fathoms. Entirely suitable for my end uses. 

Quality (5/5). I found the Avet's materials, fit, and finish spectacularly good.

Casting (4/5). Based on some old Amazon reviews of the MXL, I was a bit leery of how the magnetic cast (MC) braking system would perform, but it proved effective, smooth, and easy to adjust. The Avet MC system is on par with the standard Penn Fathom II 15, which is good. However, it falls marginally short of my Squall 15 that is retrofitted with high-performance ABEC-7 bearings and my Akios 757. I'm a mediocre caster, but I was comfortably able to field cast 6 and 8 oz. sinkers just over 100 yards with a 12-foot rod without any backlashing -- even on the lowest magnetic setting "1".  By comparison, I achieved 120 yards with the Akios 757 and 110 yards with the upgraded Squall in my test sessions. (Yeah, I do need distance casting lessons and I've signed up for them in autumn.)

Power (4/5). This reel has a good retrieve rate. The mechanism doesn't feel as fluid as the big Daiwa Saltist or the Penn Fathom 40, but it is solid and hasn't the slightest hint of creep or slip. 

Drag (4/5). I'm quite new to the single-speed lever concept versus stars. I had no trouble using the level and setting the drag, and when hand pulled it seemed smooth and strong.  Stars seem like a more robust setup -- am I wrong? The box claims max strike drag of 15 lb and max 20 lb - unspectacular but adequate for my uses, and I'm hoping to test it on a big blacktip or old guard yellowtail sometime though. 

 

I see the Avet MXL 5.8 MC and my 30-50 class 12-foot Penn Battalion rod becoming my preferred blacktip/leopard/soupfin shark, bat ray, and drum surfcasting outfit, and a frequent companion on day charters where a 40-lb class outfit is needed for medium tuna, yellowtails, groupers, etc. 

 

 

 

 

  

Edited by Capefox

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've had several Avet reels, and experienced the notorious pinion bearing failure early on with the rooky mistake of setting the drag too high.  I also service my own reels and those of several of my friends, am comfortable with Avet internals, and last year rebuilt a badly abused SX G2 for a buddy.

 

If anybody can tell me how the G2 reels can generate the claimed drag numbers without crushing the pinion bearing, I would be grateful.  Mechanically, the G2 internals don't seem much different from the "G1" reels.  Color me skeptical over those drag claims.  Having said that, I also have no problem fishing these reels with a light drag. Fewer fish lost to ripped lips.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 mins ago, mike1010 said:

I've had several Avet reels, and experienced the notorious pinion bearing failure early on with the rooky mistake of setting the drag too high.  I also service my own reels and those of several of my friends, am comfortable with Avet internals, and last year rebuilt a badly abused SX G2 for a buddy.

 

If anybody can tell me how the G2 reels can generate the claimed drag numbers without crushing the pinion bearing, I would be grateful.  Mechanically, the G2 internals don't seem much different from the "G1" reels.  Color me skeptical over those drag claims.  Having said that, I also have no problem fishing these reels with a light drag. Fewer fish lost to ripped lips.

 

I've been quite happy with star drags my whole life so a lever drag is entirely new to me. Locking a 40 lb drag down and winching in a big gamefish sounds swashbuckling, but the reality of max drag and fatigue was illustrated to me on a recent tuna charter. Big, tough guys were going red in the face and sweating profusely as they battled big bluefins for 30 minutes or more. As we motored back to San Diego, I spoke to several anglers and learned that the reels they were using weren't rated for more than 20 - 25 lb of drag. I'll probably take it easy on the drag settings because (a) I'm a wimp, (b) I'd like to avoid the pinion failure you mentioned, and (c) my grandfather landed a lot of big mulloway and 2.5 meter sharks on Penn reel rated for no more than 15 lb of drag back in the '50s through the '70s. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, mike1010 said:

I've had several Avet reels, and experienced the notorious pinion bearing failure early on with the rooky mistake of setting the drag too high.  I also service my own reels and those of several of my friends, am comfortable with Avet internals, and last year rebuilt a badly abused SX G2 for a buddy.

 

If anybody can tell me how the G2 reels can generate the claimed drag numbers without crushing the pinion bearing, I would be grateful.  Mechanically, the G2 internals don't seem much different from the "G1" reels.  Color me skeptical over those drag claims.  Having said that, I also have no problem fishing these reels with a light drag. Fewer fish lost to ripped lips.

 

 

A few slight modifications were made to increase drag power: larger pinion bearing, stiffer belvilles, bigger drag pressure plate, and some changes to the frame to handle the increased pressure.

 

The G2 reels can indeed generate the stated drag numbers.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
53 mins ago, Capefox said:

I've been quite happy with star drags my whole life so a lever drag is entirely new to me. Locking a 40 lb drag down and winching in a big gamefish sounds swashbuckling, but the reality of max drag and fatigue was illustrated to me on a recent tuna charter. Big, tough guys were going red in the face and sweating profusely as they battled big bluefins for 30 minutes or more. As we motored back to San Diego, I spoke to several anglers and learned that the reels they were using weren't rated for more than 20 - 25 lb of drag. I'll probably take it easy on the drag settings because (a) I'm a wimp, (b) I'd like to avoid the pinion failure you mentioned, and (c) my grandfather landed a lot of big mulloway and 2.5 meter sharks on Penn reel rated for no more than 15 lb of drag back in the '50s through the '70s. 

 

When I used my SX G2 I set the full drag tono more then 17lbs on a full spool.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree that drag numbers are probably the most over-hyped reel spec.  How many people can stand up to 25 lbs. of drag without some kind of assist?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, mike1010 said:

I agree that drag numbers are probably the most over-hyped reel spec.  How many people can stand up to 25 lbs. of drag without some kind of assist?

 

Not many.

 

But, higher drag numbers tend to generate confidence that your reel will not blow up or the frame will not warp easily. That is how I see it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to register here in order to participate.

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.