t_man7

Table saw voltage?

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Looking at a SawStop, I see they have 2 voltages.  A 120 Volt and a 230 Volt, what’s the benefit of the 230 Volt over the 120?  This Table Saw won’t just be used for plug building.

 

83BA2321-32D2-4A30-9735-CC82B77DBEC3.jpeg

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13 mins ago, t_man7 said:

Looking at a SawStop, I see they have 2 voltages.  A 120 Volt and a 230 Volt, what’s the benefit of the 230 Volt over the 120?  This Table Saw won’t just be used for plug building.

 

83BA2321-32D2-4A30-9735-CC82B77DBEC3.jpeg

I'd heard that running at higher voltage increases motor life? Very nice saw BTW, and neat technology.

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Posted (edited) · Report post

If you look at the specs, the 120v is 1.75 hp, and the 230 is 3 hp. Whether more power is worth the extra $400 and adding the wiring to your shop depends on your work. If you're ripping 3" of maple, I'd get the 230.

 

Curious: have you owned a TS before? I've had a gigantic old 14" 5hp Rockwell, and have had a Ryobi BT3000 contractor saw for several decades now. There's not much I can't do on the latter, but that's partly a function of my work.

 

Edited by gellfex

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20 mins ago, gellfex said:

If you look at the specs, the 120v is 1.75 hp, and the 230 is 3 hp. Whether more power is worth the extra $400 and adding the wiring to your shop depends on your work. If you're ripping 3" of maple, I'd get the 230.

 

Curious: have you owned a TS before? I've had a gigantic old 14" 5hp Rockwell, and have had a Ryobi BT3000 contractor saw for several decades now. There's not much I can't do on the latter, but that's partly a function of my work.

 

Never owned a table saw before.  I will definitely be ripping maple, in the process of having an electrician wire the shop now, so going with the 230 volt isn’t any more hassle.

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When running higher voltage, in general it draws less amperage. 

However tje 220 volt has a lager motor. Prolly draws the same amps as the smaller one

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In the past 50 plus years I've used 8"-10"-12" saws...I built my entire home inside and out with a 9" delta...If your going to cut 3/4 ply you don't need a lot of hp..heavy thick hardwood every now and then you don't need a lot of hp...if your going to start up a production shop then buy all means get one with a lot of hp....what most folks don't take into consideration is what blades will do what...heavy thick carbide blades need   a lot of power to get them through wood...thin blades cut just as well without a lot of power....dado blades chew out a lot of wood at a time but your not going very deep..very little power is needed and your not pushing the materials through very fast...molding heads same thing....what makes a huge difference IS your side and out feed tables if your going to do a lot of sheets of plywood...not hp...blades are many..plain steel..carbide...thin kerf..thick kerf..combination..finish...I'll use a plain steel combo blade for ripping thin and thick dry or wet wood but not on plywood...point is you don't need a tank of a saw to cut wood..knowing what blades are for what is key...that and table surface is.

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It would appear they offer two models 1.75 hp at 110volts and 3hp at 230.

in general, going from 110 volts to 220 volts on the same motor cuts the amperage required off the 110 volts in half. If the motor draws 15 amps at 110v then it will draw 7.5 amps at 220v. The reduction in amps is better for the motor, as the momentary start requirements are reduced.

This particular model appears to be designed for less than industrial uses (electrically) and the amperage required for each model should easily fit within the 

capabilities of the home wiring system.

Given a choice, the 3 hp motor would be the best option.

 

Ed

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 assuming its going to be stationary.. and not traveled to  job sites ... I would go with the 230..and as before mentioned  Blades make a Huge difference in the operation and function dynamics...The old Giant saws are great and industrial and last forever but it really depends on what your shooting to accomplish.. they can be cumbersome because there so big ..smaller ones can be a  little more back forgiving if your running one all day..

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