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Seals

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funny thing ive noticed is that on the backside there are loads of seal colonies of hundreds to thousands in nauset inlet, chatham inlet, monomoy, ect.  but so long as you are in a boat offshore in at least 25 to 30 ft of water there wont be a seal to be found.  you can be out there happily catching bass, the seals rarely make an appearance (im sure due to the presence of the other apex predator in our waters).  Conversely on the CCB side or inside the marshes and inlets the things are everywhere making fishing very difficult if one finds you and follows you around.  I think CCB has more juvenile sharks and the outer cape is where the big boys are.  Ptown its a little mix of both.   Anyone else notice this trend?    

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5 mins ago, 55555s said:

How far south are they becoming regulars?  

 

Are the common in the LIS?

 

Have never seen nor heard of one around the other side or in NJ waters.  

 

 

my brother lives in NJ and says he sees them frequently when he is surfing there.

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      I know lobster-men  don't take to kindly to them .. if they start messing with their traps 

      you can guarantee there will be some dead seals... Maine ... 

              

              

               

            

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2 hours ago, mikez2 said:

It isn't quite that simple. 

 

The biggest harvest of seals was the babies.

Clubbing baby seals became an international BFD. They pretty much shut down baby seal clubbing around the world.

 

Meanwhile, the entire concept of wearing fur was fading and/or being driven extinct by animal rights activists. 

 

The loss of the international fur trade, particularly baby seal fur, is the biggest reason the seals rebounded.

 

If by some miracle the Marine Mammal Protection Act was repealed, there would still be no market for adult seal fur.

You'd be faced with asking the American people and international animal rights community to accept the clubbing of baby seals on US soil.

 

Anyone thinks we'd ever go back to a time when fishermen could just shoot seals to let them rot, is delusional. 

Anyone who thinks an official cull of a few hundred animals would matter to thousands of miles of coast is equally so.

And no, there will never be a viable hunting season for adult seals that aren't good to eat, have crappy fur and would make a hideous mount. I doubt you could ever sell more than 100 tags to the Don Jrs of the world. Meaningless as population control. 

 

It's fun to fantasize about killing seals (I guess) but on a practical level, we won't see it in our lifetime. 

 

I disagree.  First, it doesnt have to be seal pups.   You dont have to do it for the fur.  Opening a limited season would garner plenty of interested hunters.  Despite the meat being  poor in flavor ( I have no idea) it will certainly be high in fatty acids and protein.  The carcass can be donated to local pet shelters or even marketed as an Organic free range pet food.  

 

Institute a reverse tag for a cull.  $2000 tag, and yo get $800 back for each Seal harvested up to 2.  

 

There are a lot of options.  

 

Selling a few tags, as you say, wouldnt make much dent, but repeating the process can reduce numbers (we've seen this in just about every game animal you think of) to a more "acceptable" level.  

 

Humans are very good and very creative at killing things.  Dont underestimate our ability to impact the local ecology.   

 

I am not advocating, as I am very far removed from the region, the seal "problem", etc.  but an effective  cull or hunt can certainly be done.  

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I began seeing greys last year. Prior to that it was only harbor seals. We saw this enormous grey (we named him Salty) 4-5 times last summer while jigging at night. One night he swam into my line and did a total freak out. Upon my line just touching his back, he exploded, causing a surface eruption like a gbft.

However, now they're commonplace. We saw several different ones yesterday alone.   Salty looked pretty content eating his fresh striper today.

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2 hours ago, mikez2 said:

And no, there will never be a viable hunting season for adult seals that aren't good to eat, have crappy fur and would make a hideous mount.

Cmon Mike. That is one beautiful animal.

915-440.jpg.6da72dae61311af0b8586171d13294b3.jpg

 

2 hours ago, mikez2 said:

I doubt you could ever sell more than 100 tags to the Don Jrs of the world. 

I feel like the public demand for these hypothetical tags would actually outpace the number issued. I think a fair number of hunters would jump at the chance to sharpshoot seals for a cull. 

 

3 hours ago, mikez2 said:

It's fun to fantasize about killing seals (I guess) but on a practical level, we won't see it in our lifetime. 

Sure gets me goin'!

Typically on the weekends, just before a Tinder gal drops by, I'll run out back and stick an M80 in a plush Grey stuffie.

<<☆Bang☆>>

Better than Cialis.:th:

***

Seriously though: it's annoying to have one spot become so unfishable because of seals that you have to move. 

It's beyond frustrating to have many spots across SNE ruined. 

And it's maddening to have one steal and eat two healthy 30lb breeders in front of your face, snap your new rod, and end the best catching night of your season.

Given that reality, I will vigorously defend my right to hyperbolic statements about shooting seals with elephant guns:rav:

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6 hours ago, rst3 said:

Grey seals will continue to expand in population and range, so long as there is food to support them. Where does this end up in 10 or 20 years? Will surfcasting or boat fishing for bass even be possible? In many areas, catching the seals' dinner may just become SOP for fishing. Hook a fish for 30 seconds, then break off on a seal. 

People will just shift toward boat fishing which will still be viable.  Just expect a larger logjam at the boat ramps, longer queues to get a marina slip, and overall more boat traffic.

 

3 hours ago, mikez2 said:

If by some miracle the Marine Mammal Protection Act was repealed, there would still be no market for adult seal fur.

You'd be faced with asking the American people and international animal rights community to accept the clubbing of baby seals on US soil.

The point about about a lack of a market for seal meat or fur is spot on.  As far as killing an animal and farming their fur or skin they do that to sheep in the United States and many other European countries for UGGs.  So, if by chance there is a market for seal meat/skin those same people who are OK farming one animal over another animal should realize there's a hypocrisy there.  Those groups who are against all farming of animals are at least consistent with their arguments.

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1 hour ago, 55555s said:

How far south are they becoming regulars?  

 

Are the common in the LIS?

 

Have never seen nor heard of one around the other side or in NJ waters.  

 

 

They show up in numbers in LIS in the late fall and stay through May-ish until the water warms up. That said there are always a few residents that stick around...I was out yesterday about a mile off shore and there was a monster seal following the boat around. Surprisingly it didn't shut down the bite and he never ended up stealing a fish. 

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I doubt the general public would ever allow killing if seals. The protests would be ridiculous. A method of birth control for the females or sterilization of the large males needs to be developed. That could keep the population in check without public outrage. 

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7 hours ago, rst3 said:

 

 

Grey seals will continue to expand in population and range, so long as there is food to support them. Where does this end up in 10 or 20 years? Will surfcasting or boat fishing for bass even be possible? In many areas, catching the seals' dinner may just become SOP for fishing. Hook a fish for 30 seconds, then break off on a seal. 

Don't worry about it.

 

Stripers will soon be gone and seals will leave or starve to death.

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47 mins ago, rst3 said:

Cmon Mike. That is one beautiful animal.

915-440.jpg.6da72dae61311af0b8586171d13294b3.jpg

 

 

I will admit, after researching the gray seal hunts in Finland and Iceland, the skull mounts look pretty cool. Not $3000.00 cool, but cool.

 

I got no problem with you using obvious hyperbole to blow off steam after losing a cow to a seal. No doubt I would have plenty of colorful language in that situation. 

 

Just as an exercise in curiosity, I wonder Just how many tags they sell in those places where hunting is allowed. 

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Seal and beavers.   Another well meaning conservative effort gone wrong.   

All my best upland bird covers are now beavers swamps, under 5' of water.  Now the frosting on the cake is I have grey's sitting up shop practically ini my front yard chomping on fresh stripers daily.  :banghd:

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2 seasons ago I started seeing Grey Seals in Metro Boston. It appeared to only be one. It was confined to one area. Still you will only see or hear one, but now it's in different areas. 
 

Just one of these ****ers wreaks havoc. It takes one and returns 30-45 minutes later. They make easy work out of 40lb bass hooked. 

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5 hours ago, mikez2 said:

It isn't quite that simple. 

 

The biggest harvest of seals was the babies.

Clubbing baby seals became an international BFD. They pretty much shut down baby seal clubbing around the world.

 

Meanwhile, the entire concept of wearing fur was fading and/or being driven extinct by animal rights activists. 

 

The loss of the international fur trade, particularly baby seal fur, is the biggest reason the seals rebounded.

 

If by some miracle the Marine Mammal Protection Act was repealed, there would still be no market for adult seal fur.

You'd be faced with asking the American people and international animal rights community to accept the clubbing of baby seals on US soil.

 

Anyone thinks we'd ever go back to a time when fishermen could just shoot seals to let them rot, is delusional. 

Anyone who thinks an official cull of a few hundred animals would matter to thousands of miles of coast is equally so.

And no, there will never be a viable hunting season for adult seals that aren't good to eat, have crappy fur and would make a hideous mount. I doubt you could ever sell more than 100 tags to the Don Jrs of the world. Meaningless as population control. 

 

It's fun to fantasize about killing seals (I guess) but on a practical level, we won't see it in our lifetime. 

You're talking about different seals. The international outcry was about clubbing Harp seals, which we don't have around here. Gray and harbor seals are our problem.

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