RedGreen

Slammer IV DX CNC stainless gears question

67 posts in this topic

definitely interesting.  wonder why they won't have a high speed version?  i had pretty much decided on the high speed version of the 6500, but now, with the dx, have to think that over.

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2 hours ago, srm413 said:

wonder why they won't have a high speed version?

The same reason, I am guessing, that there won't be a bailless DX model: not enough demand. These are reels for a niche within a niche, for a small subset of surf guys. 

The specs on the reel are up on Penn's website. I am waiting for the schematics to be released -- that will make for some fun reading. :read:

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A slammer IV DX 6500HS would be a great land based tarpon and shark plugging reel. Room for close to 500 yards of 50lb braid, way more than enough drag, light enough to fish and cast all night. Could be used for bait too but I personally much prefer a lever drag for that, especially live bait. All this assuming the gears and other critical parts aren't sourced from inferior chinese materials like a couple slammers I had last winter, and even a 20' Saltiga. 

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On 8/3/2021 at 8:31 PM, RedGreen said:

A slammer IV DX 6500HS would be a great land based tarpon and shark plugging reel. Room for close to 500 yards of 50lb braid, way more than enough drag, light enough to fish and cast all night. Could be used for bait too but I personally much prefer a lever drag for that, especially live bait. All this assuming the gears and other critical parts aren't sourced from inferior chinese materials like a couple slammers I had last winter, and even a 20' Saltiga. 

You got that right. Heck of a tarpon reel.

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Can anyone find whether or not the dx is lighter than the normal version? I know stainless might save a little weight but they added a bearing as well which adds weight so I'm not sure.

 

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I saw and heard a Penn rep on 2 different YouTube videos say that the DX stainless gears "will be just as smooth if not smoother" than the brass gears on the regular slammer. That's a major accomplishment IF Penn truly did achieve that. 

 

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On 8/14/2021 at 8:37 AM, Themavis said:

Can anyone find whether or not the dx is lighter than the normal version? I know stainless might save a little weight but they added a bearing as well which adds weight so I'm not sure.

 

You have to be a man to fish these great reels. Good god Im so tired of hearing guys complaing about the weight.

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There does get to be a point where weight is felt. For me a 31oz spinner all night long plugging is a bit heavy unless I can straddle the rod which isn't always possible. 24-25oz is no problem though. 

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This machinist of nearly three decades is seriously scratching his head. 
Titanium and Inconel are impervious to salt water. 
I don’t care what kind of stainless their made out of. Salt water will ruin em. 
Galvanic corrosion. The corrosion of two dissimilar metals in the presence of salt water. 
Pack the gears with Jewlers Rouge. A paste abrasive of high quality. 
Precisely the stuff used to smooth out and mesh the gears in fine Swiss timepieces. 
Spin the handle and then spin it some more. Once it’s operating really nice now. Clean it out with lighter fluid. Grease it up and go catch some fish. 

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14 mins ago, Linesidesonthefly said:

This machinist of nearly three decades is seriously scratching his head. 
Titanium and Inconel are impervious to salt water. 
I don’t care what kind of stainless their made out of. Salt water will ruin em. 
Galvanic corrosion. The corrosion of two dissimilar metals in the presence of salt water. 
Pack the gears with Jewlers Rouge. A paste abrasive of high quality. 
Precisely the stuff used to smooth out and mesh the gears in fine Swiss timepieces. 
Spin the handle and then spin it some more. Once it’s operating really nice now. Clean it out with lighter fluid. Grease it up and go catch some fish. 

It's a hell of a lot better than 5160 or M2 steel. Aluminum corrodes too. The goal is for water to never reach the gears anyways. 

 

Do you have experience doing this with fishing reels? Does it work with hypoid and helical gears that see load bearing? I know nothing of a watch's inner workings. 

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1 min ago, RedGreen said:

It's a hell of a lot better than 5160 or M2 steel. Aluminum corrodes too. The goal is for water to never reach the gears anyways. 

 

Do you have experience doing this with fishing reels? Does it work with hypoid and helical gears that see load bearing? I know nothing of a watch's inner workings. 

Let’s walk down a Manufacturing road and I’ll get to the other stuff right quick. 
Time is money. That’s the end all be all. These components are made on CNC machines at blazing fast speeds. More widgets faster makes more profits. 
Does anyone really believe a reel will fail when a fish is on the drag and the fisherman is cranking the handle?

The compressive strength of these materials is greater then either fish or man can impart. 
The issue lies in the quality of the fit between the helical and or hypoid gear.  The blazing fast manufacturing process leaves a bunch of sharp edges. Those sharp edges are what makes a reel not work smooth. I offered up a no BS solution to fix it with Jewlers Rouge. The Rouge will burnish and set the gears properly and they will work that way for far into the future. 
Ask a Machinist about materials and craftsmanship. For god sakes don’t ask the guy at the tackle shop. He’s in it to make a sale and will fan your ass with BS until you buy one. 
Reminds me of when “6061 T-6 Aluminum” was all the rage in Fly Reels. Nothing more then a talking point to BS a buyer into thinking they got something special for that crazy price tag. 
It was all BS. I challenge any manufacturer to refute what I’m sharing. Trust me they will not take it on. 
Hard to BS a guy who’s been there and done that. 

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17 mins ago, Linesidesonthefly said:

Let’s walk down a Manufacturing road and I’ll get to the other stuff right quick. 
Time is money. That’s the end all be all. These components are made on CNC machines at blazing fast speeds. More widgets faster makes more profits. 
Does anyone really believe a reel will fail when a fish is on the drag and the fisherman is cranking the handle?

The compressive strength of these materials is greater then either fish or man can impart. 
The issue lies in the quality of the fit between the helical and or hypoid gear.  The blazing fast manufacturing process leaves a bunch of sharp edges. Those sharp edges are what makes a reel not work smooth. I offered up a no BS solution to fix it with Jewlers Rouge. The Rouge will burnish and set the gears properly and they will work that way for far into the future. 
Ask a Machinist about materials and craftsmanship. For god sakes don’t ask the guy at the tackle shop. He’s in it to make a sale and will fan your ass with BS until you buy one. 
Reminds me of when “6061 T-6 Aluminum” was all the rage in Fly Reels. Nothing more then a talking point to BS a buyer into thinking they got something special for that crazy price tag. 
It was all BS. I challenge any manufacturer to refute what I’m sharing. Trust me they will not take it on. 
Hard to BS a guy who’s been there and done that. 

Dude. Chill. 

 

There are two ways to make a strong reliable part as you know. Geometry and material choice. Both are necessary but there is a point where you can lean on one more so than the other. The 20 daiwa saltiga spinning reel for example leans more heavily on geometry, maximizing contact area between teeth to minimize stress. The okuma makaira spinning reel leans more so on material choice, with a hot forged SS main gear and a hardened SS pinion gear. The meshing of the teeth is not perfect but the strength of the base material makes up for any shortcomings there. Both are extremely strong reliable systems. 

 

Material choice is important but not the end all. Everyone here knows the slammer III. Most know how reliable and durable the drivetrain is/was in that reel. Until covid sparked some serious supply chain issues, and Penn (other manufacturers too) started sourcing inferior quality materials for their parts. I had a 5500 which was butter brand new, but had horrific gear noise and grinding after like 10 outtings, nothing more than 3lbs being caught. My friend went through 4 4500s, all with the same story ending with main gear failure. I inspected these gears closely, and the meshing pattern was good. The teeth just plain wore and lost all the buttery smoothness they had out of the box. 

 

I understand the concept of helping the gears wear to mate to each other. I did what I suppose you could call some machinists work for a number of years too, it's not a complicated concept. What I asked is if you have done it with a reel, not a watch or some other system. 

 

If you don't believe a reel can fail mid fight maybe you need fish that pull harder. 

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