gman1253

Tampa Bay Fishkills

Rate this topic

27 posts in this topic

Posted (edited) · Report post

Reading about Tampa & St. Pete having a tough time with Red Tide  - oh man. Here's the story:

 

" Currently, Tampa Bay and St. Petersburg have the highest red tide concentrations on Florida’s west coast. That may or may not be a coincidence. Back in April, more than 200 million gallons of nutrient laden industrial wastewater was pumped directly into Tampa Bay, in an attempt to avert a full collapse of the containment reservoir. The Piney Point event brought national attention and outrage to Florida’s water crisis, but little substantive action was taken and authorities and the state began the waiting game.

Now that water temperatures are nearing 90 degrees and rainfall runoff is increasing, Tampa and its surrounding areas are bracing for the full effect of poor water quality, and many are already calling it the worst it’s ever been.

A Emergency Response manager with the city of St. Pete, Florida, provided an update on the current situation last Friday: “As far as what I’m hearing, we’re seeing larger fish kills than what we saw in 2018. But it seems to be concentrated in the St. Petersburg area.” The 2018 red tide season was particularly devastating for the entire state of Florida–that red tide inflicted more than $8 million in business losses and killed more than 200 tons of marine life.

Tampa Bay fly fishing guide, Captain Dustin Pack, said that he’s “never experienced a fish kill to this magnitude in Tampa Bay. It’s the worst I’ve ever seen it.” What’s particularly concerning with this red tide event are the type of fish dying. In the past couple of days, Dustin received pictures of a 5′ hammerhead shark and a Cobia floating dead–those are strong fish that normally do not succumb to red tide. In addition, “if tarpon are dying it’s bad. If they can’t withstand the water quality by breathing air, it’s really bad.”

None of this is new. Red tide is naturally occurring. However, it’s greatly intensified by human-caused factors, mainly nutrient pollution. For this reason, Dustin added “I believe calling it red tide gives the entities responsible (i.e. Piney Point, the state of Florida, golf courses, over fertilized yards) a scape goat.”

In addition to being a full time fly fishing guide, Dustin is a board member for Tampa Bay Water Keeper, and “[they’re] working hard to make sure those who are responsible are held accountable.” Unfortunately, nothing can be done in the short-term; you can’t just clean billions of gallons of estuary water. You have to fix it at the source, which means addressing the nutrients entering the waterways and restoring the natural flow of water. The reality is that nothing can be done to avoid whatever is going to happen at this point. But, Dustin is hoping that these jarring images produce some national attention to bring more awareness and advocacy to fixing these long-term issues. One way you can help achieve that is by calling the Florida Fish and Wildlife Commission (800-636-0511) and bring more attention to this ongoing issue. Ultimately, if FWC doesn’t get involved, none of this is getting to Governor DeSantis.

Edited by TimS
links

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, gman1253 said:

Reading about Tampa & St. Pete having a tough time with Red Tide  - oh man. Here's the story:

 

" Currently, Tampa Bay and St. Petersburg have the highest red tide concentrations on Florida’s west coast. That may or may not be a coincidence. Back in April, more than 200 million gallons of nutrient laden industrial wastewater was pumped directly into Tampa Bay, in an attempt to avert a full collapse of the containment reservoir. The Piney Point event brought national attention and outrage to Florida’s water crisis, but little substantive action was taken and authorities and the state began the waiting game.

Now that water temperatures are nearing 90 degrees and rainfall runoff is increasing, Tampa and its surrounding areas are bracing for the full effect of poor water quality, and many are already calling it the worst it’s ever been.

A Emergency Response manager with the city of St. Pete, Florida, provided an update on the current situation last Friday: “As far as what I’m hearing, we’re seeing larger fish kills than what we saw in 2018. But it seems to be concentrated in the St. Petersburg area.” The 2018 red tide season was particularly devastating for the entire state of Florida–that red tide inflicted more than $8 million in business losses and killed more than 200 tons of marine life.

Tampa Bay fly fishing guide, Captain Dustin Pack, said that he’s “never experienced a fish kill to this magnitude in Tampa Bay. It’s the worst I’ve ever seen it.” What’s particularly concerning with this red tide event are the type of fish dying. In the past couple of days, Dustin received pictures of a 5′ hammerhead shark and a Cobia floating dead–those are strong fish that normally do not succumb to red tide. In addition, “if tarpon are dying it’s bad. If they can’t withstand the water quality by breathing air, it’s really bad.”

None of this is new. Red tide is naturally occurring. However, it’s greatly intensified by human-caused factors, mainly nutrient pollution. For this reason, Dustin added “I believe calling it red tide gives the entities responsible (i.e. Piney Point, the state of Florida, golf courses, over fertilized yards) a scape goat.”

In addition to being a full time fly fishing guide, Dustin is a board member for Tampa Bay Water Keeper, and “[they’re] working hard to make sure those who are responsible are held accountable.” Unfortunately, nothing can be done in the short-term; you can’t just clean billions of gallons of estuary water. You have to fix it at the source, which means addressing the nutrients entering the waterways and restoring the natural flow of water. The reality is that nothing can be done to avoid whatever is going to happen at this point. But, Dustin is hoping that these jarring images produce some national attention to bring more awareness and advocacy to fixing these long-term issues. One way you can help achieve that is by calling the Florida Fish and Wildlife Commission (800-636-0511) and bring more attention to this ongoing issue. Ultimately, if FWC doesn’t get involved, none of this is getting to Governor DeSantis.

Don't slap the hands. cut them off. These problems go back to 1955 and I was 10. Back then they  dug out coral as fill for building, They were called rock pits. They dumped cars and tires etc.  into the pits, then filled them over leaving a lake fore water front property.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Almost exclusively HRK holdings fault for what's happened here. It hasn't rained much at all and the red tide came before the typical summer afternoon rains did. So it's not fertilizer or runoff. It's completely devastated the bay and surrounding areas. HRK holdings is I think trying to file for reorganization bankruptcy or something like that, which is minimal liability for the company. So much politics trying to not liquidate this garbage company. They need to be erased, for one. Obviously a lot of other problems to solve too but this year HRK holdings is the one left holding the bag. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, RedGreen said:

Almost exclusively HRK holdings fault for what's happened here. It hasn't rained much at all and the red tide came before the typical summer afternoon rains did. So it's not fertilizer or runoff. It's completely devastated the bay and surrounding areas. HRK holdings is I think trying to file for reorganization bankruptcy or something like that, which is minimal liability for the company. So much politics trying to not liquidate this garbage company. They need to be erased, for one. Obviously a lot of other problems to solve too but this year HRK holdings is the one left holding the bag. 

Hey typical corporate tactics, they either hide behind the corporate veil or have multiple LLCs and "sell/ move" the assets around to have no assets to lose in a lawsuit. Saw the same tactic up in CT with a firm that built a highway that did not meet specs. The state went after them & voila - no assets. The best part was that years later the state hired the same "principals" to do another project, as they had used a different named corporation.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cancelled flight tks and car rental today  for next week visit .can’t fish and can’t breath best stay where I am up north at this point .  How long until this clears up ? is anyone’s guess 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is what happens when we live in a country where corporations have much more power and protection than the citizens and environment. 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, odiemike86 said:

This is what happens when we live in a country where corporations have much more power and protection than the citizens and environment. 

 

well the politicians are in cahoots with the crops via political contributions, gifts, junkets & just plain corruption.  As long as they get rich everything is rosy...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, gman1253 said:

well the politicians are in cahoots with the crops via political contributions, gifts, junkets & just plain corruption.  As long as they get rich everything is rosy...

 

There is the real problem.
 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Fish kills are still happening in Charlotte county. Boca Grande is now being involved. 

 

Its creeping a bit south. As our winds shift so does it.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Brdhntr47 said:
  16 hours ago, gman1253 said:

well the politicians are in cahoots with the crops via political contributions, gifts, junkets & just plain corruption.  As long as they get rich everything is rosy...

 

3 hours ago, Brdhntr47 said:

 

There is the real problem.
 

 

No doubt!  BUT, what can we really do about this behavior if there are no real consequences.  Is mass protest/media coverage  the only thing that will work anymore?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 mins ago, ghettowrapped said:

 

No doubt!  BUT, what can we really do about this behavior if there are no real consequences.  Is mass protest/media coverage  the only thing that will work anymore?

Media coverage funny ... you would think that the greenies would be screaming at CNN, FB, Twitter, NYT, Washingon Post, ABC, NBC, and the rest to push our elected officials to actually do something now vs. something in 25 years.  Problem as usual is, humans & how much they love money, power & staying in office to rape our system of govt.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Maybe since this area is home to the Buccaneers, Lightning and Rays (all made it to the Big Stage of their sports!) we can hope someone steps up and stands up to hold SOMEONE accountable.

 

I know, **** pipe dreamer.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to register here in order to participate.

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.