Tin Boat

5 wt fly rod for salt water

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You can definitely fight a decent fish on a 5. It seems from a lot of what I see down south the light rods are mostly matched up with floating lines, do they have the backbone to lift a sinking line out to start the cast with a decent amount of line out or do you need to retrieve more than with a heavier rod?

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1 hour ago, Drew C. said:

If only all of us could fish like Flip...

You all can. You don't have to be famous to learn how to fish effectively and safely with lighter tackle. People have been doing this for years. (Check out the short clip, "Salar The Leaper," of Lee Wulff fishing for Atlantic Salmon on an Orvis midge rod.)

 

Steve Culton

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23 mins ago, stormy monday said:

You can definitely fight a decent fish on a 5. It seems from a lot of what I see down south the light rods are mostly matched up with floating lines, do they have the backbone to lift a sinking line out to start the cast with a decent amount of line out or do you need to retrieve more than with a heavier rod?

I don't know, since I only ever use a floating line with my 5-weight. I would think with the right rod (all 5-weights are not created equal) and know-how, fishing and casting a sinking line would not be a problem. But since most of my 5-weight action occurs in water that's less than six feet deep (and in some cases far less) I'm not sure why I'd want or need a sinking line.

 

Steve Culton

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I’m typically in under 5 feet of water, so who knows :).  I can pick up way more of a 5 1/2 weight line than I can get a decent back cast with, so with a heavier line, maybe as the back cast would float less?

 

I can’t say how the lighter weight rods would work in deeper waters. In the marshes and creeks, the shot might be short, so with a bunch of line at my feet, the rod is just a shock/slack absorber and my fingers handle the fight until the reel comes into play.

 

I love watching the videos of the older guys (I’m old, they’re older :) )  just reinforces slow down take it easy.

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4 hours ago, stormy monday said:

You can definitely fight a decent fish on a 5. It seems from a lot of what I see down south the light rods are mostly matched up with floating lines, do they have the backbone to lift a sinking line out to start the cast with a decent amount of line out or do you need to retrieve more than with a heavier rod?

Just retrieve more. 10 wt. rod will not lift a great deal of sunken line out. We tease it out. Vertical lift or sometimes a circle C can work. Longer casting arcs are de rigour,

 

Oly

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IMO - Sage still the standard in salt. Have used from RPLX to Xi3.

Don't be afraid to pick up a cheap RPLX and upline it - loads & shoots like an Exocet !

Good luck to you.

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On July 29, 2021 at 2:06 PM, The Fisherman said:

You all can. You don't have to be famous to learn how to fish effectively and safely with lighter tackle. People have been doing this for years. (Check out the short clip, "Salar The Leaper," of Lee Wulff fishing for Atlantic Salmon on an Orvis midge rod.)

 

Steve Culton

Lee Wulff was a bad ass and in terms of light tackle the whole reel in the pocket and casting the line by hand thing he was always talking about is as light as it gets...It was a different time but i don't think this is a respectful way to fish for Atlantic salmon. A bit like shooting at deer with a .22 except there's a lot more deer than Atlantics out there.

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I wish I had a $ for every time I read slow down and upline. A rod can be moved too fast or too slow for the amount of line to be cast and it’s mass and the rods action and power also has a huge influence. Our goal is to get a straight line rod path to get good loops. So we also need to get the casting arc the right size to to match the rod, the speed we cast and the lines mass.

If we want to upline then we have to make adjustments to arc size and the speed we cast. Too many up line before they look at their cast. Uplining is commonly done because guys claim they can’t feel the rod load. I would bet money that the real issue is that they do not have proper control of the fly line. It is almost certain that they have lost tension in the fly line and typically this will be in the back cast.

The very best way to know and I mean really know is to try casting from an open stance and turn the head and watch that back cast. Did it reach the end. Did it sag. By turning you will get bang on timing,

Most people find this hard to do. But it you work at it then it will come to you.

Benefits are huge. Tension means control which means slack is taken out to..This means a way better cast and I do mean way better.

 

Mike

 

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Mike - please note that my uplining ref was made specifically to the RPLX model (a 32 year old model) and not a general blanket comment. I'm in no way suggesting this as a correction for bad or wanting technique but does give the caster options in certain situations.

 

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Rm101

Sorry  I should have been more careful with my post and explained it was general and not specific necessarily to any on the thread.

Some rods are rated very badly and mostly underrated so do need to be uplined one or even two lines to get a better match.  Or we upline to suit a situation.
I have cast a 10 wt RPLX and it was a sweet rod and would stand up today with modern rods on the market. Class never gets old.
Mike

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LOL.  

I have a 10wt RPLX (2 piece) and have always hated it........even more so with an 11wt line.  Rewrapped it to make it lighter and it still sucks.

I have an 8wt RPLX (3 piece) that was my primary rod for 20 years......and it is WAY less fun to cast than the Exocett or Sector I use nowadays.  Feels like a club in comparison.

That said, I don't feel the new rods cast significantly further than the RPLX, at least in my hands.  

But what has any of this to do with 5wt rods in saltwater?   

 

 

   

 

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   I spend a lot of time with my 5's. Fresh, salt, whatever. The fact is there isn't a soul on this forum that needs an 8wt to throw a #4 fly 35', and anyone with half a brain is going to keep their rod low enough during the fight that it hardly matters what rod you use. I break and bend the same hooks I use with bigger rods. Getting a large/green fish to hand with a 5wt can get interesting, but it's still the right tool for calm days and smaller flies.

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I was throwing gurglers on my 8' 5 weight this weekend, a blast for LMBs, but I have found that there are times I don't feel the rod load. Reading Mike's analysis I think the fly being cast can also influence that. Trying to toss a 1/0 gurgler 60' with a DT5 for example does this as the fly's air resistance does impact the cast a lot. I switched to a WF and it was better, but once I put on a fly the rod was intended for (#14 dry) it cast like a charm. Went back to a size 1 gurgler with a little judicious trimming and it was acceptable if not great at that distance. I will say though that these 2-4 lb. largemouth were a hell of a lot more fun than they were on a 7. I think paired with size 2 or 4s it might become my go to in the marsh.

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