prican1

Thoughts on retirement in another country

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8 hours ago, levari said:

Since you researched those countries you can share with us the monthly cost for health insurance in those five countries for us citizens and a cost to visit heart specialist.. Let see the numbers..

Different health care systems from the USA. For example, in Thailand you buy “insurance” at a given hospital/system range is 1000 USD per year or more depending on your needs. I dunno about cardiology. Look into it if that’s what you need. Panama is 1-2k a year. You can pay more if that’s what makes you happy 
 

All payment is up front for care so no surprises in the mail and fights with insurance companies. 
 

Based on what I’ve seen on the board,  you just want to troll people so I’m done with responding to you. 

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7 hours ago, hookmeup said:

Different health care systems from the USA. For example, in Thailand you buy “insurance” at a given hospital/system range is 1000 USD per year or more depending on your needs. I dunno about cardiology. Look into it if that’s what you need. Panama is 1-2k a year. You can pay more if that’s what makes you happy 
 

All payment is up front for care so no surprises in the mail and fights with insurance companies. 
 

Based on what I’ve seen on the board,  you just want to troll people so I’m done with responding to you. 

I don’t know why you think that I want to troll people.

This thread is about retirement and as such I am looking at people retiring at the legal retirement age which is above 65. And as such I am comparing Medicare plus supplement insurance vs other health care in foreign countries for US citizens. Not Swedish or Panamanian citizens.

 

I am also not talking retiring at the age of 55 without Medicare.

 

So let see, with Medicare and supplement the average payment is about $4.5k per year. I can choose almost any doctor I wish or medical facility and I am not limited. I pay $0 for any doctor visit, hospitalization, emergency rooms etc.

 

Now, come and tell me if this is the same quality of services in Thailand. I want to hear if God forbid and you get cancer, do you prefer to be treated in Panama or US? What about Thailand? Do you wish to see a specialist in Panama or in US? Can you choose any specialist you wish in Thailand or are you limited to a pool of doctors? How long do you have to wait for an MRI or non-emergency surgery in Panama or Thailand? Did you research the quality  or just the $ numbers?

 

What about hospitalization for serious illness? Would you prefer Thailand over US?

 

Trolling? My s$$.

 

Edited by levari

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On 07/07/2021 at 5:34 PM, prican1 said:

7 more years and I'm done... I want to enjoy my retirement fishing and duck hunting, I have a decent savings where I can live like a king in several other countries or comfortably here in the good'ol USA. Any info, experience or inside knowledge would be appreciated. First thing on the list is good medical, I don't want to be scene by some doctor in a mudhut  whose last patient was a goat... 

Stay in the US. Then travel as much as you want, when you want, and where you want.

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1 hour ago, snapper1 said:

Stay in the US. Then travel as much as you want, when you want, and where you want.

I think the whole point most people seek in relocating outside the USA is to minimize expenses/cost of living.  You don't stay in the USA AND 'travel as much as you want' under the 'comfortable'  definition.  That would be more like 'living like a king'.

 

I dunno.. maybe my standards are lacking these days.. I better move it up a bit.

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16 hours ago, z-man said:

I don’t think any other countries healthcare can compare to the US especially not a second or third world country where it will be cheap to live. I used to work with someone from the Dominican Republic. Her parents were pretty wealthy and they would fly to Miami to see a doctor. 

My uncle had a Polish housekeeper.  She developed cancer and went back to Poland, where she was still a citizen and could get her cancer treated for free.  The surgery was apparently successful.  Then she died of pneumonia in the hospital during recovery.

 

She had no pulmonary problems going in.

 

Still remember when I was in Namibia.  Some hospitals in Windhoek, the capital, were supposedly world class.  But where we were, near Omaruru, the patients lay on the floor (another hunter's wife was a nurse and wanted to tour the local facility; she was apparently horrifed by what she saw.

 

When I finally get too old to run offshore and have to settle for fishing quiet water, I plan to move back to my old home town in Connecticut, where the hospital has a piano bar, is affiliated with Yale/New Haven, and if you're admitted, you can pay a few extra bucks to get steak or lobster for dinner.

 

Didn't want to live there, but it's an nice place to go home to die.

 

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15 hours ago, Ditch Jigger said:

You have no idea what you're talking about, as usual. :rolleyes:

Almost all of Europe has universal healthcare for all legal residents, at very low cost. It costs me the equivalent of less than $25 to see a doctor---lower than my US co-pay. Instead of $168/month for Medicare Part B, I pay nothing for coverage. Lots of other services are free. When my wife broke her wrist 2 winters ago, the hospital bill, for ER, X-Rays, in-patient surgery and discharge meds was about $150. 

Northern/western Europe, Australia, New Zealand, and Canada all have quality medical facilities,  I know less about Japan, but I'd suspect that they're good, too.

 

But once you get outside of that range of countries, concerns about medical care do tend to grow.

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20 mins ago, CWitek said:

My uncle had a Polish housekeeper.  She developed cancer and went back to Poland, where she was still a citizen and could get her cancer treated for free.  The surgery was apparently successful.  Then she died of pneumonia in the hospital during recovery.

 

She had no pulmonary problems going in.

 

Still remember when I was in Namibia.  Some hospitals in Windhoek, the capital, were supposedly world class.  But where we were, near Omaruru, the patients lay on the floor (another hunter's wife was a nurse and wanted to tour the local facility; she was apparently horrifed by what she saw.

 

When I finally get too old to run offshore and have to settle for fishing quiet water, I plan to move back to my old home town in Connecticut, where the hospital has a piano bar, is affiliated with Yale/New Haven, and if you're admitted, you can pay a few extra bucks to get steak or lobster for dinner.

 

Didn't want to live there, but it's an nice place to go home to die.

 

Where you plan to die is something important to think about. Do you want to be in Panama when you are 85 and need constant care or back in the US? Maybe the best idea is to move abroad at retirement age but plan on coming back when elderly. Of course no one can predict their health. Some people are unhealthy at 65 and others are still fine at 90. 

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16 hours ago, levari said:

Are you on Medicare plus supplement or some low cost cheap insurance?

No, individual policy, best that I could get. Cost is up ~150% over the last few years, care is down by the same lol.

 

I know we have excellent medical professionals in this country but access is an issue. Plus, we all don't need that level of care. Yes, it's nice to know that it's there though.

 

Insurance companies drive care, not the docs. My first mri this year was out of pocket since I hadn't reached my deductible, but... insurance co still has to approve the request, and they take their sweet assed time doing so. Best is when I get the letter saying my treatment/testing has been approved but I'm responsible for all of it because deductible wasn't met. I don't have any issue with paying, it's the waiting that's the problem which delays care quite a bit. Mighty nice of them to approve my claim that really shouldn't need approval to begin with since it's out of pocket. Then there are prescription meds, you better get what's on their list, if not they won't pay for it unless the doc runs thru hoops to get it done. I

 

I have significant concerns about the future of this country in the coming years which will coincide with my retirement. I've brought up leaving with my wife more than a view times. I'm not saying that it's going to happen, only that perhaps it should be looked into at some point. As things move on I'll see what happens and adjust accordingly.

 

Levari - must be nice to live in Levari-land. Z-bass picks up on the first ring, every time; perfect medical care - everything is great in Levari-land!

 

 

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The great equalizer is time. Take a year of healthy living off anyone rich or poor and yes it's 365 days. Retire earlier with a little less $, and enjoy your life. If your funds far exceed what you anticipate your needs are, give it to the family members that can use it, now. Not when you croak. Have known more than one person that got seduced to stay at their job,for a great deal of $  and regretted their choice    because their, or one of their love ones , time ran out .I retired at 59 and that was ouch 16 years ago. I have never regretted my decision.  On a  lighter note, the Brits have  one of the highest tax rates in the world, and retire in Spain or Portugal. Malta is not a bad choice either.  

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1 hour ago, Drew C. said:

No, individual policy, best that I could get. Cost is up ~150% over the last few years, care is down by the same lol.

 

I know we have excellent medical professionals in this country but access is an issue. Plus, we all don't need that level of care. Yes, it's nice to know that it's there though.

 

Insurance companies drive care, not the docs. My first mri this year was out of pocket since I hadn't reached my deductible, but... insurance co still has to approve the request, and they take their sweet assed time doing so. Best is when I get the letter saying my treatment/testing has been approved but I'm responsible for all of it because deductible wasn't met. I don't have any issue with paying, it's the waiting that's the problem which delays care quite a bit. Mighty nice of them to approve my claim that really shouldn't need approval to begin with since it's out of pocket. Then there are prescription meds, you better get what's on their list, if not they won't pay for it unless the doc runs thru hoops to get it done. I

 

I have significant concerns about the future of this country in the coming years which will coincide with my retirement. I've brought up leaving with my wife more than a view times. I'm not saying that it's going to happen, only that perhaps it should be looked into at some point. As things move on I'll see what happens and adjust accordingly.

 

Levari - must be nice to live in Levari-land. Z-bass picks up on the first ring, every time; perfect medical care - everything is great in Levari-land!

 

 

Mr. Drew- The title of this thread is retirement in foreign country. I retired at 65 when Medicare kicked in and not before. If you wish to retire before 65 then you better be able to afford a reasonable insurance policy if you wish to have a better coverage.

 

In regard to prescription meds, the list of meds exists all over the world, not just in US.

 

The cost of insurance is driven by the high cost of our medical system. Part of the high cost of our medical system is driven by the high cost of out education system. So blaming just the insurance companies is ridiculous.

 

 

 

 

Edited by levari

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11 hours ago, snapper1 said:

Stay in the US. Then travel as much as you want, when you want, and where you want.

Sounds good..

10 hours ago, scoobydoo said:

Buy a condo and an rv... :)

Sounds good too...

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