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Thomas and Thomas Exocett 350 grain fly rod

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So yesterday, I picked up a new T & T Exocett SS fly rod (thanks to a shop that accepted trade ins) in the 350 grain size...I'll initially be throwing an integrated sinking shooting head line in that very weight...but my question is, how flexible is that rod in terms of throwing lighter or heavier weights? It's more or less a curiosity more than it is a concern given that 300 and 350 grain lines seems to be what's in my wheel house (I have plenty of other rods to throw floating lines with)

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The fact is that all rods cast multiple line weights for the simple reason that the rod's capability is strictly subjective.

Herb

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I just fished the SS 350 for a week and really enjoyed it. Most of the time I was fishing a WF9I that has a 330 grain head but also fished with an OBS S6 that's a 375 grain and a Rio Striper line with a 300 grain head. They all fished great but I found as I went up in line weight the more it made sense to water load rather than lots of false casting... Which makes sense that's what the rod and some of those lines are designed for. 

 

But I found it to be a very fun and versatile rod to fish and I'd feel comfortable fishing fishing anything from 275-425, all with slightly different approaches. Would love to hear how it goes with the lines you fish... let us know. 

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Thanks a lot and will do - I have two 250 grain integrated lines, two 300 grain line, one 350 grain and one 400 grain (which I've been using on my 8 weight switch fly rod...sounds like I could possibly throw all but the 250 grain lines (which I had been weighing between the 250 and 350 grain versions of these rods, and it appears I made the right choice)...Supposedly you could also throw floating and int lines, especially if they have shorter heads

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No prob, keep me posted. And definitely can throw floating lines. I cast a 9wt Flats Pro floating line and it was great, just a slower, more open casting stroke than a fast action rod. 

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On 22/06/2021 at 6:42 PM, codyjorge said:

I just fished the SS 350 for a week and really enjoyed it. Most of the time I was fishing a WF9I that has a 330 grain head but also fished with an OBS S6 that's a 375 grain and a Rio Striper line with a 300 grain head. They all fished great but I found as I went up in line weight the more it made sense to water load rather than lots of false casting... Which makes sense that's what the rod and some of those lines are designed for. 

 

But I found it to be a very fun and versatile rod to fish and I'd feel comfortable fishing fishing anything from 275-425, all with slightly different approaches. Would love to hear how it goes with the lines you fish... let us know. 

codyjorge,

 

It is interesting that for you that you felt as you cast ever heavier lines that the weight of the fly line when water loading the rod was more effective and that this reduced false casting.

 

Water loading will cause the rod to bend even more due to the friction on the line. This additional loading is needed just to release the line from the water.

To get the sunken  line onto the surface for a water haul will need a roll cast. Often more than one depending on how deep the line has sunken and how much of the fly line.

We can’t just drag a sunken line out of the water and into a cast.

I think you will find if you make a good roll cast that you can pick it up out of the air and make a better forward cast with the same amount of line you will have on the surface making a water haul. Rod power is lost to the massive water drag on the line..  It is much harder work on the Caster to.
Typically we should not need to make more than two false casts to maximise our cast. Often and especially with heavy sinking lines one is sufficient. 
Honestly I don’t think for a second that a rod and line are designed with water hauling as a parameter. Try water hauling in heavily rippled water or surf.

A rod is simply a flexible stick and the fly line an elongated weight. 
Quite a few guys seem to think that rods that are capable of casting upwards of 300 grains are specifically for sinking lines. Why. No reason at all not to cast a floating fly line that weights upwards of 300 grains with a single hand rod.

We do it all the time with double Handers.
What we need to address more than gear is our actual cast. Honestly that’s the route to the solution to every casting situation out there.

 

Mike

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