Frank2104

Trying for flounder around IR Inlet

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Going out this weekend with my son on his pontoon boat. If using live minnows would a fish finder rig be appropriate? How much weight is needed if you're in a lot of current?

If you're using a ducktail how large of one?

Hope I'm not asking for too much detail. Thanks in advance.

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I'd skip the fishfinder when it comes to flounder.

 

A simple rig would consist of main line-barrel swivel-6 to 12" of leader-dropper loop-30" of leader-hook.  You can add some dressing like bucktail to the hook if you like.

 

A minnow and a strip of squid hooked on one end to give a nice flutter tail is a great flounder bait.  Use enough weight so you can keep the line perpendicular to the bottom and lift, drop, lift, drop as you drift.

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Around IRI?   The difference between one spot and another can be dramatic.   Even within a few hundred yards.   Some spots it's 1/4 ounce spec rig and others it's 2 ounce bucks. All within a mile or so.  

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18 hours ago, Frank2104 said:

Going out this weekend with my son on his pontoon boat. If using live minnows would a fish finder rig be appropriate? How much weight is needed if you're in a lot of current?

If you're using a ducktail how large of one?

Hope I'm not asking for too much detail. Thanks in advance.

I would not drift the inlet in a pontoon for Flounder. I would head back into the bay, and drift the channel edges coming off the flats.

 

How much weight? Enough to drag bottom. All depends on depth and current. Use as little as needed to keep contract while drifting.

Bucktail? Again, depends on depth and current. Large enough to bounce bottom while drifting.

 

Last, have you guys ever fished for Flounder before? It appears not, but would help to know in order to give some recommendations.

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All good suggestions above. I'd do a few things before you go if I were you. 

First, I'd go watch a few John Skinner vids on fluking, he demonstrates his philosophy on rigging, drifting, technique etc. It can help. He has a unique jigging technique that lends itself to bucktails and gulp, but you don't have to use it if you're going with minnows. You can see how he works his drift and what he looks for. 

Second, I'd look at the tide charts and see what current directions you'll be seeing when you get out there. 

Third, I would poke around the Navionics webapp for potential spots. As what was said before, channel edges are a good spot to look at. Having a list of a few spots before you go out helps. You can judge the depths you'll be dealing with. This also ties in with number 2 on which direction the drift will be. 

Hope that helps. 

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19 mins ago, JAL said:

I would not drift the inlet in a pontoon for Flounder. I would head back into the bay, and drift the channel edges coming off the flats.

 

How much weight? Enough to drag bottom. All depends on depth and current. Use as little as needed to keep contract while drifting.

Bucktail? Again, depends on depth and current. Large enough to bounce bottom while drifting.

 

Last, have you guys ever fished for Flounder before? It appears not, but would help to know in order to give some recommendations.

Haven't fished for flounder in many years and then only rare occasions. We didn't go into the inlet but drifted along edge of the channel just off South Shore Marina and then near Massey's Landing. I think main thing I was looking for was some idea of range of weights to use. I was trying to use a light jig head with Gulp but it was just toooo light for that area. The suggestion of bucktails up to 2 oz is helpful for example.

 

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Short drifts!   Don't waste time on empty water.  When you find one flounder there will be more.  Repeat the drift and work the area hard.  

 

Use your GPS and tracks to keep close to your original drift line.

 

Like was said above the main inlet is not as good as channel edges.  Outgoing high is usually the best as the warm water moves out of the shallows with the bait.  If you can get to a secluded area and the drift is not working dropping the anchor and casting spec rigs or bucktails tipped with your bait can be deadly 

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