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What got you interested in striped bass?

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Sousaville on YouTube when he first started posting videos was what got me into it. Then the videos just never kept coming. Bummer. Last year I ran into him and got to meet him though. Great guy. We both fished the Charlestown breachway and had it all to ourselves that night. Slayed fish that night. 

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Talking to Cooper Gilkes of Coops Bait and Tackle on Martha’s Vineyard.   I caught my first Striped Bass because of him.  Was also my first fish.  

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22 mins ago, t_man7 said:

Talking to Cooper Gilkes of Coops Bait and Tackle on Martha’s Vineyard.   I caught my first Striped Bass because of him.  Was also my first fish.  

Professional from the start. Awesome

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This is an easy one.  My father got me into Striped Bass and his father got him into it. 

 

The sickness is contagious.

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I was introduced to the salt by my neighbors fishing for fluke, I had stayed a bit later than usual and casted my bucktail into pitch black and hooked up with a bass. First time ever and it put up a hell of a fight, after that I was looking at every vid and interested by every bass fisherman every time I went!

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I fished off the Brooklyn piers a lot early 90s but rarely saw stripers. Then in 97 or 98 watched a guy pull a nice striper at Riis beach late one summer afternoon with a long rod and a spoon. Watched him fight that fish and I was like “I have to try that.” Work and life happened but recently rediscovered fishing and I knew exactly what I wanted to target. 

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1 hour ago, jps1010 said:

This is an easy one.  My father got me into Striped Bass and his father got him into it. 

 

The sickness is contagious.

Same here.  Basically grew up on my fathers and grandfathers boats.  Use to sleep overnights in the cabin but always come running out when the clicker was singing.  By the time i was 10, i was riding my bike to the nearby harbor for blues almost every morning. When i got my license, i really started to target bass from shore with the expanded range of the car.  Ohh, the good old days with no real responsibilities...  

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There was something about the mystique of it. That "in" group at the tackle shop. The guys hanging out in the lot BSing and waiting on the tide. Wanted to be part of that.

And now it's pretty much gone. Thank you beach replenishment and the ACOE :mad:

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They were the big game of Long Island Sound.

 

I grew up catching flounder, snappers, tomcod, and eels, with a few blackfish, smelt and porgies thrown in.  But there were those people who were coming to the dock as the sun was dropping below the horizon to just start their angling day.  Sometimes my father was among them, and in the morning he'd sometimes be home with fish that seemed unimaginable huge compared to what I was used to.

 

When I was six or seven, I caught a short while fishing for flounders, and it felt special.  The next year, it happened again.  By the time I was nine or so, my father would sometimes take me out after work, not late at night, but in last light of day.  My mother would pack a cold dinner, and we'd all ride in the boat as the sun disappeared, and catch a usually short striped bass or two.  I looked forward to the trips.

 

In another couple of years, bass became our primary target, and by the time I was in juinior high, it was all that I wanted to fish for.  Caught a couple of half-decent--I wouldn't say big, but pushing 20--fish by that point, and then it was about taking the boat out on my own, learning to use plugs and bucktails in addition to worms, etc.  Got caught up in the different techniques, including fly fishing, and became a hardcase before I got out of high school, and enjoyed some very good years before the collapse, when I was in college and law school, worked in a tackle shop, and didn't have to worry about spending much of my time on the water.

 

The fish still give me the same rush that they provided fifty years ago.

 

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Stripers were always the mystery fish when I was young.  I was big on fw growing up but went on a few rides with some DE bay cranberry.  They would pull big tide runner weakfish off their pots before they hauled them.  I got a decent striper that day and that was it!

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Well, You have trout on ultra light tackle for a few weeks in early April. You've gotta find something to fish for until the big Yellow-Eyed Demon Choppers show up. Spring time schoolies are a ball on ultra light tackle from mid April through May. There's no shortage of them, they're not very selective or smart and unlike their larger counterparts they fight you the whole way until you lift them out of the water. Come June you start finding larger fish intercepting the arriving bunker and shad at the mouths of estuaries and harbors as well as laying on the bottom in open water within rod range under the roving pods of bunker traveling up and down the shore that will soon be fuel for the savage Bluefis h blitzes that I spend 9 months waiting for every year. 

 

   That and It's nice to lay a fat bass in front of that "In-crowd" or "cool kids" mentioned in a previous post that you see sitting around a table drinking coffee and shooting the s**t in a corner of the tackle shop they've claimed for themselves on Saturday and Sunday mornings. Seems like every bait shop has a group of them lol!

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A striper fisherman moved next door and took me night fishing on the jetties in Longbranch back in the mid 70s. With a few years off here and there, I've been doing it ever since, usually at night and almost always off the rocks.

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